DIY Bubbles Recipe (No Dawn Required!)

My toddler learned how to say “bubbles” a few weeks ago, and we have basically been on the back porch ever since.

My son, Darrol Henry, likes to watch me blow bubbles, but even more than that he likes to try to blow them himself. At 18 months old, his technique is still in the formative phase. Right now, it seems to involve sticking the bubble wand into his mouth or at least pressing it directly to his lips. The kid is eating his share of bubble solution, is what I’m saying here. While I still wouldn’t want him drinking the bubble solution in the recipe below, at least it’s a bit better than ingesting conventional dish soap loaded with toxic ingredients.

Related: Edible Play Dough Recipe, Make Moon Sand for Toddler Sensory Play

If your child tends to eat his toys like mine does, you want to choose the cleanest possible dish soap. He doesn’t need to be eating any artificial colors and fragrances. My recipe below calls for Seventh Generation soap, but any unscented natural dish soap will do the trick.

The vegetable glycerin and sugar work together to make your bubbles last longer by increasing their surface tension. There is definitely a point of diminishing returns on these ingredients, though. You want to find a balance between how to make bubbles with some staying power and making bubbles that are so heavy they fall to the ground instead of floating.

How to Make Bubbles Without Dawn

Materials

+ small bowl
+ 1 cup water
+ 1/4 cup 7th Generation Dish Soap
+ 3/4 teaspoon vegetable glycerine
+ 1/2 teaspoon sugar
+ funnel
+ small empty container with a water-tight lid – I rinsed out and reused a container that held our last store-bought bubble solution
+ bubble wand – Bonus: If you don’t have a bubble wand, you don’t have to buy one! Check out how to make one from a pipe cleaner instead!

Directions

1. Combine the liquids in your container, stirring gently to combine them well. Gently stir in the sugar until it dissolves, then use the funnel to pour your homemade bubble solution into your storage container.

2. If your stirring made the liquid get frothy, wait for that to die down a bit. You can technically blow bubbles now, but the froth can be a little bit annoying.

3. Blow bubbles!

49 comments

Magdalena J.
Past Member 2 years ago

Thank you!

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willian Miller
william Miller3 years ago

thanks

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Jennifer Daniel
Past Member 3 years ago

Thank you! I avoid P&G products, too.

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JL A.
JL A3 years ago

nice to know

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Fi T.
Past Member 3 years ago

Both good and fun for the players and their environment

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Lynn Rubal
Lynn Rubal3 years ago

Thanks for the recipe!!!!!

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Ganaisha Calvin
Ganaisha Calvin3 years ago

Good to know

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Rose NoFWDSPLZ
Rose Becke3 years ago

Thank you

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Connie O.
Connie O3 years ago

thanks

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Donna T.
Donna T3 years ago

thank you

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