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Doggie DIY: 8 Projects

Doggie DIY: 8 Projects

Have you ever calculated the cost of owning a dog? Most of us have pets because we love them, and most dog owners feel the love outweighs the financial investment. But, owning a pet comes with a lifetime commitment and providing for a dog can be pricey.

According to Pet Education, over a 14 year lifespan of a dog, your pooch can cost you anywhere from $4,000-$40,000.

Here’s a short list of doggy costs:

Purchase price (unless you are given a dog)
Food
Vaccines and Vet bills
Spay/Neuter
Dog Bed
Treats
Bowls
Collars
Leash
Training
Grooming Tools
Boarding
Crate

Let’s see if we can take a bite out of the cost of dog ownership by making some goodies for our best friends.

Doggie DIY

1. Collar
This tutorial form Sew4Home gives step-by-step directions for making an awesome collar. Here’s a green suggestion from Sew4Home: “When this collar or leash starts to show wear, simply cut off the webbing/ribbon and reuse the hardware to make a new one.”

2. Biscuits
My two pooches love these healthy dog treats. Their breath smells great too!

3. Booties
Wintertime walks can be painful on sensitive paws. Some dogs love comfy boots. Also, check out the video on how to fit your dog for boots.

4. Drinking Bowl

Instructables provides a simple reuse for plastic bottles -  upcycle them for water bowls.

5. Dog Tags
Leave it to Martha Stewart to provide downloadable templates that uses easy-to-find materials to create a customized ID tag for your dog.

6. Dog Bed
Craft Daisies has created an easy inexpensive pet bed to make.

7. Dog Food
Make your own eco-friendly dog food. Your dog will thank you for this healthy meal. Also, check out these canine nutrition tips for keeping your dog healthy.

8. Dog Tent
Here’s a canine camp shelter that gives new meaning to a pup tent.

Since I am a pet owner and also a bit of a design junkie, I follow the website, Desire To Inspire’s – Pets On Furniture feature. Now, in my home this would never happen!

Read more: Crafts & Design, Crafts & Hobbies, Dogs, EcoNesting DIY, Everyday Pet Care, Pets, , , , , ,

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Ronnie Citron-Fink

Ronnie Citron-Fink is a writer, editor and educator. She has written hundreds of articles about sustainable living, the environment, design, and family life for websites, books and magazines. Ronnie is the creator of Econesting, and the managing editor of Moms Clean Air Force. Ronnie was named one of the Top Ten Living Green Experts by Yahoo. Ronnie lives in New York with her family.

90 comments

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8:04AM PDT on Jun 3, 2012

thanks

7:45AM PST on Feb 3, 2012

It IS possible to feed your dog (and cat!)a home made diet that they will thrive on, for about what you'd spend for the very top quality commercial food. But the recipe given here is NOT the way to go. I have a store where we sell the very best commercial foods in all the currently available forms: kibble, canned, freeze-dried, frozen raw, dehydrated-complete and dehydrated premixes to which you add your choice of proteins. We also teach people how to make their own, customized for their own animal's specific needs. The costs of the best commercial foods (and there are some good ones) keep going up due to factors that have nothing to do with their nutritional content: the costs of domestic sourcing of ingredients, which consumers know enough to insist upon; the costs of food safety and handling technology; and the costs of transportation. Think about the last item: each ingredient is shipped from the farm to the manufacturer, sometimes with a stop or two in between. In the case of meats, from the farm to the feedlot to the slaughter facility to the manufacturer. Then from the manufacturer to the distributor, then to the retailer. In the coming years it will make much more strictly economic sense to make your own pet food. And it can be orders of magnitude better nutritionally. But you have to get the basics right. This recipe says you "can add powdered milk or bone meal for calcium" -- implying that calcium is optional. Calcium MUST be right in every dog's dail

4:56AM PST on Jan 18, 2011

Thanks for the info.

6:11AM PST on Jan 13, 2011

Thanks. I will look into some of these tips.

12:17PM PST on Jan 7, 2011

Thanks for the article. BUT, the water bowl is a DEFINATE NO, NO, NO!!!!!!! The bottles are made of a plastic that is NOT safe.. Especially if they are out in te sun or heat. You can go to a DOLLAR store and get a stainless Steel one for - a DOLLAR!!!!!

5:20AM PST on Dec 31, 2010

thanks for sharing

9:38AM PST on Nov 15, 2010

Thanks for the helpful tips. I have 2 dogs, so I try to save where I can without my dogs being neglected.

11:50AM PDT on Oct 18, 2010

Thanks for the tips

1:35AM PDT on Oct 16, 2010

thanks.

10:21PM PDT on Oct 15, 2010

useful~~~~~~~~

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