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Easy Greening: Shopping Bags

Easy Greening: Shopping Bags

As far as shopping bags go, the plastic versus paper dilemma is as puzzling as the one about the chicken or the egg. The truth is, the statistics on both types of bags are deeply disturbing. At first glance the alternatives seem less than convenient—-but after learning the facts and finding some easy solutions, we’re saying “neither thanks” to “paper or plastic?”

In South Africa plastic bags have been dubbed the “national flower” because so many are seen fluttering from fences and dangling in bushes—-some report that at times it looks like a snow storm. According to the National Geographic News, between 500 billion and one trillion plastic grocery bags are consumed worldwide each year. That 100,000 birds die annually from encounters with plastic bags actually seems like a relatively small number—-ditto the estimated 100,000 whales, turtles, and other marine animals.

In the United State alone, 12 million barrels of oil are required to produce enough plastic bags to appease our needs. And then there’s that little decomposition problem: 500 years in the landfill.

OK, paper then, right? Well, actually. . .producing paper bags requires more energy and creates more air and water pollution than producing plastic bags. Recycling paper is much more energy-intensive than recycling plastic—-and then there’s the issue of all those trees. In 1999, 14 million of them were knocked out to create the 10 billion paper grocery bags we used that year.

Armed with this knowledge, here’s what we’ve decided: reusable shopping bags aren’t such a hassle after all. Here are some tips:

1. Pack some ultra compact nylon bags (that fold up into tiny packets) in your purse so that you are always prepared for unexpected errands.

2. Stow fabric (hemp, jute, canvas, cotton, recycled plastic textile, etc) bags in your trunk for big shopping trips-—just get in the habit of returning them to the trunk after unpacking groceries.

3. Reusing plastic and paper bags helps; keep a supply of them in your trunk for groceries and use them until they are too worn, then recycle. (Some stores, like Whole Foods, offer a rebate when you BYOB.)

4. Look French and use baskets when you go to the farmers’ market. Salad doesn’t get as squashed when you put it in a round-bottomed basket.

5. If you get stuck with groceries but without your totes, pick plastic: when statistics are compared, it is the lesser of the two evils. Try to reuse it again and when it comes time to recycle it, tie it in a knot to keep it from blowing away from the trash and landfill and into the trees and ocean. Some chain supermarkets, like Stop N’Shop, actually have a barrel in front for recycling plastic bags.

The best advice is to simply get into the mind-set: once it becomes habit the inconvenience disappears and it seems there was never another way. In fact, in 2002 Irish supermarkets began charging a mandatory 15-cent tax on each new plastic bag. According to one of the largest grocery chains the consumption of new plastic bags has dropped by 97.5 percent—-how’s that for inspiring? Clearly, the plastic bag will not be replacing the shamrock, so let’s follow that example. Here are some good places to start:

For cute and peppy totes: b.happybags

For a great selection of super-practical (including ultra compact): Reusablebags.com

For stylish bags and a 10 percent donation to protect sea turtles: Blue Lotus

One of our favorites—-packs of five wonderfully designed bags that fit in a pouch for your glove compartment or medium-size purse: Envirosax

Read more: Home, Eco-friendly tips, Green Home Decor, Green Kitchen Tips, Household Hints, Reduce, Recycle & Reuse, Smart Shopping, , , ,

By Melissa Breyer, Editor, Care2 Green Living.

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Melissa Breyer

Melissa Breyer is a writer and editor with a background in sustainable living, specializing in food, science and design. She is the co-author of True Food (National Geographic) and has edited and written for regional and international books and periodicals, including The New York Times Magazine. Melissa lives in Brooklyn, NY.

86 comments

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5:26AM PST on Dec 21, 2011

Super. Thank You

11:28PM PST on Nov 7, 2011

great advice

1:32PM PDT on Aug 9, 2011

Thank you

5:07PM PDT on Jun 29, 2011

Excellent article. Thanks for sharing.

10:53PM PDT on May 16, 2011

What do we put our garbage in?

8:27PM PDT on May 15, 2011

Great article Melissa! We have a new idea and solution to help make reusable shopping bags less of a hassle to use. Please check us out at www.zzbagger.com and let us know what you think.

11:16AM PDT on May 12, 2011

Thanks Melissa.

3:34PM PDT on Apr 7, 2011

I love the string bag in the picture. I keep a pile of reuseable bags in the boot of my car, but one that would that would fit in a pocket or handbag. Anyone got a pattern for making?

7:58AM PST on Mar 7, 2011

Many stores...even chain groceries...have free gimme bags, or inexpensively priced ones, in cotton. Watch out for the ones that are actually some kind of treated plastic. And insist on having your purchases put in your bags even when the store employees want to grab the plastic.

11:30AM PST on Feb 7, 2011

amazing to me how many people still insist on not bringing their own bags for shopping ...

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Disclaimer: The views expressed above are solely those of the author and may not reflect those of
Care2, Inc., its employees or advertisers.

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