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Give Honey Love

Give Honey Love

It’s hard to improve upon the perfection of honey—the darling of edibles. But perfect as it may be, playing around with infusions of flavor can result in some significant deliciousness. And what great gifts flavored honeys make! Read on to learn how to make warming spice honey, tart fig honey, rose petal honey, and more.

WARMING SPICE HONEY
1 cup honey
3 cinnamon sticks
1 teaspoon whole cloves
3 pieces star anise
6 cardamom pods

1. Bring honey and spices to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer for five minutes.
2. Remove from heat and let sit for up to 24 hours.
3. Reheat, strain and cool.

ROSE PETAL HONEY
Use fresh rose petals, but be absolutely sure that the flowers have not been treated with pesiticide. You can also try this recipe with dried lavender flowers—use 2 tablespoons dried lavender buds in place of the rose petals.

1 cup honey
˝ cup fresh rose petals

1. Bring honey to a boil, remove from heat and stir in rose petals.
2. Let sit for four hours, return to a boil, then strain and cool.

GINGER LIME HONEY
1 cup honey
8 slices fresh ginger
2 limes, zest only

1. Bring all ingredients just to a boil in a small saucepan, then reduce heat to low and simmer for five minutes.
2. Remove from heat and let sit for ten minutes. Strain and cool.

TART FIG HONEY
1 cup apple cider vinegar
1 cup honey
2 cups dried figs, quartered

1. Combine ingredients in a saucepan and bring to a boil.
2. Reduce heat to a low simmer and cook for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.
3. Remove from heat, cool, and strain.

HOT PEPPER HONEY
1 cup honey
2 jalapenos, quartered, or 2 teaspoons crushed red pepper flakes

1. Combine ingredients in a saucepan and bring to a boil.
2. Reduce heat to a low simmer and cook for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.
3. Remove from heat, cool, and strain.

Read more: Food, All recipes, Basics, Desserts, ,

By Melissa Breyer, Producer, Care2 Green Living

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Melissa Breyer

Melissa Breyer is a writer and editor with a background in sustainable living, specializing in food, science and design. She is the co-author of True Food (National Geographic) and has edited and written for regional and international books and periodicals, including The New York Times Magazine. Melissa lives in Brooklyn, NY.

42 comments

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6:36PM PST on Feb 3, 2014

Rose petal honey sounds amazing.

2:36PM PST on Dec 4, 2013

Blue agave honey is wonderful in iced tea. It actually melts very well.

11:24AM PST on Dec 3, 2013

They sound gorgeous, and have given me a new Christmas present idea...

12:33PM PST on Dec 1, 2013

wish my mom shared her honey with me...could make some of these recipes..the warm spice honey sounds very good with tea

12:21PM PST on Dec 1, 2013

When our children were young, (30 plus years ago) we read a recipe for natural cough syrups. Simple, and effective.
In a glass jar, put lots of finely chopped garlic or onion (or both) until about three quarter full. Top up the jar with honey. Place the lid on lightly then put in the sun. Windowsill is a good spot. Leave for several days, occassionally loosening the lid to release possible pressure.
The juices from the onions or garlic release into the honey. Strain then use as a cough syrup or add to warm water and sip.
Garlic and onion honeys are also great as glazes for meats or in general cooking.
TIP: To keep ants from getting into the jar, place it in a bowl or tray of water.

5:43AM PST on Dec 1, 2013

By bringing honey to a boil, I think that this is a way to destroy it's good elements or not?

7:32PM PDT on Sep 21, 2013

thanks!

3:24PM PDT on Jul 29, 2013

Interesting info

1:31PM PDT on Apr 30, 2013

Great ideas - thanks for sharing! :)

7:23PM PDT on Mar 14, 2013

These sound interesting and very simple. Thanks for posting.

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Disclaimer: The views expressed above are solely those of the author and may not reflect those of
Care2, Inc., its employees or advertisers.

people are talking

I like Dr Greger's articles, but everything we eat in North America is polluted - not only fish.

Odd but cute. Thanks.

Good info. I may try it for a few months to see if there is any difference in a couple areas.

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