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Here’s How You Can Get Solar Panels for 20-30% Off

Here’s How You Can Get Solar Panels for 20-30% Off

Is your enthusiasm for getting energy from the sun dampened by high-priced solar systems that seem way beyond your budget? Why not band together with your neighbors to bring the price down?

That’s what thousands of people in hundreds of neighborhoods from Washington, DC to Washington state are doing, using a tried and true method that’s been around for over a hundred years, if not longer:  They’re creating “residential purchasing groups,” also called cooperatives or co-ops, and using the collective power of their purses and pocketbooks to negotiate favorable deals from companies that want to do business with them.

In this case, the purchasing groups are taking shape as “solar co-ops.” Solar panel technology uses photovoltaic cells to convert sunlight into electricity. Solar is cleaner than coal, and the supply is unlimited. You never need to worry about oil embargoes, oil spills, or coal mine explosions. Using solar also cuts air pollution and significantly reduces climate change. But here’s the catch: solar has never received the generous federal or state tax subsidies that fossil fuels have. Though the price is coming down, solar still costs more than conventional power.

By going solar via a cooperative group, each participant saves 20-30% off the cost of their system. (Do you buy in bulk at Costco or your grocery store? It’s the same principle.)  The group selects a single contractor to install the systems. They purchase the systems together, but each participant owns her own system and signs her own contract with the installer.

In most cases, joining the co-op isn’t a binding commitment. Rather, it creates a way for you to review your  roof’s suitability for solar panels using Google Maps, and it provides contact information so the chosen installer can get in touch with you and schedule a site visit to provide a free quote.

It is pretty easy to find solar installers in most American cities, and most of them are eager to do business in bulk. In fact, being approached by a solar co-op saves them time and money in marketing to individual consumers.

In addition to making solar less expensive, a co-op can become a positive force for change in the community. Solar co-ops have been able to exert influence over the political process, government agencies, and local utilities to promote other clean energy programs and give utilities guidance on proposed rate changes or the construction of new power plants.

For more information on how to launch your own solar co-op, check in with Community Power Network, a non-profit based in Washington, D.C., that has organized dozens of co-ops in the Washington metropolitan area, northern Virginia, West Virginia and parts of Maryland.

See what’s happening in Baltimore, where the Baltimore Interfaith Solar Co-op lets members purchase home solar systems from an installer en masse, negotiating a group rate that is better than if each homeowner purchased a system on her own.

Mt. Pleasant Solar Coop is an association of more than 300 households in Washington, DC’s Mt. Pleasant neighborhood. Founded in 2006, so far, the coop has installed solar panels on nearly 100 houses – 10% of their neighborhood.

D.C. Sun (DC Solar United Neighborhoods) is a non-profit that is promoting solar throughout Washington, D.C.  They estimate that solar energy could provide about 30% of the District’s electricity needs. Their website offers some terrific resources that will help businesses, nonprofits, congregations and small businesses go solar along with households.

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Diane MacEachern

Diane MacEachern is a best-selling author, award-winning entrepreneur and mother of two with a Master of Science degree in Natural Resources and the Environment. Glamour magazine calls her an “eco hero” and she recently won the “Image of the Future Prize” from the World Communications Forum, but she’d rather tell you about the passive solar house she helped design and build way back when most people thought “green” was the color a building was painted, not how it was built. She founded biggreenpurse.com because she’s passionate about inspiring consumers to shift their spending to greener products and services to protect themselves and their families while using their marketplace clout to get companies to clean up their act. Send her an email at Diane@biggreenpurse.com

40 comments

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2:26AM PDT on Oct 14, 2014

Live long & prosper

8:34AM PDT on Aug 9, 2014

great idea for homeowners

2:20AM PDT on Aug 7, 2014

Wish our condo assoc. would allow

1:22AM PDT on Aug 7, 2014

thank you for sharing

1:41PM PDT on Aug 6, 2014

thank you

8:15PM PDT on Aug 5, 2014

Interesting to know. I remember decades ago when a neighbour was the first one on the street to install them on his roof. He certainly found a lot of interest and curiosity at the time.

7:39PM PDT on Aug 5, 2014

My city will not allow solar panels on roofs they must be detached from a dwelling and movable they have no way of taxing the electricity if I create my own and want to make it hard on us.

6:06AM PDT on Aug 3, 2014

Thank you

3:36AM PDT on Aug 3, 2014

A win-win for our pocket and our environment

5:33PM PDT on Aug 2, 2014

Co-Ops are a wonderful idea.

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Disclaimer: The views expressed above are solely those of the author and may not reflect those of
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