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Honoring Your Pet’s Paleo Nature During the Holidays

Honoring Your Pet’s Paleo Nature During the Holidays

The temptations will be all around us once again this year with turkey, cranberry sauce, mashed potatoes, pies and cookies and chocolate (which is toxic for both dogs and cats).

We have to be especially careful to always honor the true nature of our dogs and cats and remember that these special foods are for us and are not what Mother Nature designed for them. But why can’t they have a little fun with us during the holidays? Overeating anything can be a problem. Our pets may be especially vulnerable during the holidays. This is when your guests will want to offer your dog(s) and cat(s) a little treat or taste of something they are eating. Children, that are not your own, may not be aware of your cats’ and dogs’ special dietary needs and species-appropriate meals and lifestyle. Besides that, everything is so tempting to share with the family pets who give us that “look.” Our cats and dogs are attracted to the amazing aromas in the house, such as a spill on the floor or that exquisite platter you placed on the coffee table. It is up to us to make sure they don’t get to help themselves so that our special evening doesn’t end with a trip to the veterinary emergency hospital.

Overeating isn’t just a holiday concern. It’s a behavior that has to be kept in check all year long. It can be dangerous, especially for dogs. Watch for symptoms such as excessive drooling, dry heaving, or vomiting, which could indicate a life threatening condition known as bloat. Your cats’ symptom of overeating will usually be demonstrated by vomiting their entire stomach content on your floor. Cats have a mechanism that causes them to vomit if their stomachs are overfilled — and overfilling could be as little as an extra tablespoon of food. But a dog’s stomach can become distended, hard, and uncomfortable to the touch. The symptoms of canine bloat are serious; your vet will refer to them as Gastric Dilatation Volvulus and this can occur when their stomach becomes overstretched by excessive gas content. It is commonly referred to as “torsion” and/or “gastric torsion,” which occurs when the stomach is also twisted.

The word bloat is used as a general term to cover gas distension of the stomach with or without twisting. The majority of ingested food, such as dry food or kibble is usually still quite dry in the stomach, so fluids from other parts of the body are often absorbed into the stomach, potentially causing your dog to become dehydrated quickly. Dry foods and commercial pet foods in both bags and cans are not biologically appropriate for what my veterinarian writing partner, Jean Hofve and I refer to as a Paleo Dog or Paleo Cat.

The Paleo Dog and Cat’s ancestors ate everything they could when they got it. For them fast food was running away from them and when they caught it they might overeat for a different reason than our pets do today. They overate because they didn’t want anyone else to get their food, once they caught it, since they didn’t know when they’d be getting to eat again.

Today’s commercial pet foods are full of flavor enhancers that notoriously trick our pets in to eating more food and tanking up on water, which is especially true with the feeding of dry foods. Dry and cooked, processed foods take a very long time to make it through the dog’s and cat’s digestive track and this offers ideal conditions for internal parasites. Parasite symptoms often manifest in overeating.

There are other health conditions that exhibit with symptoms of overeating, such as: hyperthyroidism, diabetes, pancreatitis (this inflammatory condition can also be demonstrated by refusing to eat and vomiting), pituitary gland tumors, or the inability to digest or absorb food due to a poorly functioning digestive system.

Pets on prescription drugs (like steroids) also tend to overeat. I recommend natural anti-inflammatory supplements, such as MOXXOR Omega-3 marine lipids be given on a daily basis to prevent inflammation.

Dr. Jean Hofve’s and my books such as our new, Paleo Dog, Give Your Best Friend a Long Life, Healthy Weight and Freedom from Illness by Nurturing His Inner Wolf teaches the hows and whys to feed a biologically appropriate diet. We also share the importance of love, companionship, exercise, a safe environment by pet-proofing your home — especially important during the holidays along with myriad holistic modalities.

For information on our book PALEO DOG, Give Your Best Friend a Long Life, Healthy Weight and Freedom from Illness by Nurturing His Inner Wolf, from Rodale Press, which is due out in June of 2014, you can visit Amazon.com and also pre-order it now for your Kindle or in paperback. Amazon.com.

For equal time to our cat companions, our book, The Complete Guide to Holistic Cat Care, is now available on Kindle at Amazon.com or in paperback at Celestial Pets.

Have safe, happy, healthy holidays with your whole family on two legs and four!

Read more: Pets, Cats, Celestial Musings, Christmas, Diet & Nutrition, Dogs, Thanksgiving, , ,

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Celeste Yarnall

Celeste Yarnall, PhD shares musings on myriad of topics at her Celestial Musings Blog. She is the author of The Complete Guide to Holistic Cat Care with Jean Hofve, DVM and Paleo Dog. Celeste is an actress/producer/activist/writer and keynote speaker. She and her husband Nazim Artist created the Art of Wellness Collection and are the producers of Femme: Women Healing the World. They live in Los Angeles, California with their beloved Tonkinese cats. Join Celeste at her website or on Facebook.

100 comments

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4:12AM PDT on Aug 27, 2014

thanks for sharing :)

5:34AM PDT on Aug 6, 2014

HMMM, Tammy, in Germany we have a common joke, you should better buy the turkey in a pharmacy since the antibiotic level can be 27 times higher than allowed. Buon appetite.

WHOEVER gives his dog oversalted and overspiced food is a real idiot.

My dog eats only as much as he needs, even when I give him mediumrare beef, he stops eating when he is full.
Once in a while he gets some yummies from our table, like unsalted pasta or veggies, but NEVER sweet stuff or onions, garlic, or cabbage.
He is a real cheese freak though, hehehehehe.

8:31PM PDT on Mar 30, 2014

Thank you!

11:11PM PST on Dec 29, 2013

Oh will you please give me a break?!!! If the Trrkey was not what Nature originally intended for our soft 4 legged friends what then? Processed vitamin enriched and processed crap instead? I hardly think so. Shame on you for discouraging the pets be included in the Thanksgiving festivities! Granted Caffeen, Chocolate Garlic and Onions are all toxic to cats and dogs, our pure turkey is certainly not! You had better either retract and explain to the readers what exactly is toxic or stop writing lies like you did. I am a cat breeder, have been for the past 11 years. I daily share my meat with the cats. Not one of them has died yet. And they are healthy as can be and so is their young. So please print only facts. Or what are you a animal hater? If so your stuff is out of place on care 2!!!

8:16AM PST on Dec 25, 2013

""""Today’s commercial pet foods are full of flavor enhancers that notoriously trick our pets in to eating more food and tanking up on water, which is especially true with the feeding of dry foods. Dry and cooked, processed foods take a very long time to make it through the dog’s and cat’s digestive track and this offers ideal conditions for internal parasites. Parasite symptoms often manifest in overeating.""""

I did not know.

10:36PM PST on Dec 8, 2013

Thanks.....My dogs do get to eat turkey...and veggies and grains, nuts and ever berries. They ever eat salads....not too crazy about cucumbers though....

10:54AM PST on Dec 2, 2013

Thank you

8:50AM PST on Dec 2, 2013

Thank you.

6:58AM PST on Dec 2, 2013

Thanks for sharing.

5:29AM PST on Dec 2, 2013

Be thankful to them, too

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Disclaimer: The views expressed above are solely those of the author and may not reflect those of
Care2, Inc., its employees or advertisers.

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