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Ingredients to Avoid in Multivitamins

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Ingredients to Avoid in Multivitamins

Photo Courtesy Of:† iStockphoto/Thinkstock

Just because something is touted as being “natural” or “healthy” doesn’t automatically make it true, and such is the case with some multivitamins. You really need to check the label and know what’s what, because there can be a vast difference between a synthetic or synthesized vitamin or mineral and the real thing. Some products may also contain additives and fillers that can cause problems in large doses.

According to the latest statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 50 percent of the US population takes some form of nutritional supplement each day, and approximately 40 percent of US adults take a daily multivitamin.† But despite the fact that the U.S. spends close to $27 billion on supplements each year, the rates of most chronic diseases remain unchanged, while others are still on the rise.

If supplements are so good for us, why aren’t we getting healthier?

Part of the reason could be that many people mistakenly believe that a vitamin is a vitamin, and one form of a mineral is equal to any other, failing to understand the inherent differences between synthetic chemicals and whole food nutrients. Many also mistakenly use supplements as a way to avoid having to change their dietary habits. But the proof is in the pudding, as they say, because if you eat a diet consisting primarily of processed junk food, and take cheap synthetic vitamins and minerals, you’re not likely to see a major change in your health status.

It has always been my belief that supplements should be used in addition to, NOT in place of, a sound diet. You simply cannot cover your nutritional or lifestyle “sins” by taking a handful of supplements.

Why Selenium Supplements Have Become More Popular

Selenium is an essential trace mineral found primarily in plant foods, and is known to have powerful antioxidant activity. Past studies have shown it can play a beneficial role in:

  • Cancer
  • Heart disease
  • Cognitive decline
  • Cataracts and macular degeneration
  • Cold sores and shingles
  • Osteoarthritis
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Dr. Mercola

Dr. Mercola has been passionate about health and technology for most of his life. As a doctor of osteopathic medicine, he treated many thousands of patients for over 20 years. In the mid 90ís he integrated his passion for natural health with modern technology via the internet and developed a website, Mercola.com to spread the word about natural ways to achieve optimal health.

52 comments

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2:00PM PST on Nov 21, 2012

Thank you

6:52PM PST on Jan 9, 2012

The problem is that no one actually knows what vitamins or nutrients they actually need to supplement unless that are getting tested to see if their levels are off. Most of what we're told is "good" for us is just a marketing ploy to sell a product.

Rather than recommend going to the most natural source of supplements, how about recommending that people seek out the most natural sources in their food?

9:49AM PST on Jan 9, 2012

You can get too much of certain vitamins and suffer from hypervitaminosis.

1:25PM PST on Jan 8, 2012

High quality supplements are EXTREMELY expensive and low quality ones are junk. Just eat good food and hope for the best ;-)

7:40AM PST on Jan 8, 2012

Many articles tell you what to avoid in multi-vitamins. It can get confusing. I just wish a doctor would recommend a brand to buy. When you try to research what vitamins to take, all companies recommend their brand and say it's the best. A person could stand in the vitamin/drug section and read labels all day. A doctor friend of mine says not to take any of the supplements because they are all just a way to take your money. Many supplements aren't government regulated so how do you really know what's in them?

8:51PM PST on Jan 3, 2012

thanks

3:20AM PST on Jan 3, 2012

Thank you, Dr. Mercola.

3:11AM PST on Jan 3, 2012

Glow in the dark yellow? Anyone try it to see if it works?

2:48AM PST on Jan 3, 2012

Taking a high quality daily multiple is never a bad idea, especially when few of us CAN eat an entirely well-balanced diet. However, few of us understand that we don't need 1000% percent of something or that 10/X the MDR is 10 times better. We can only absorb/utilize so much Vitamin C. The maximum amount is good, helps prevent infection, and like what another poster (Pete) said, I haven't had a cold in 25 years. Started to get a little scratchy throat a month ago and it lasted 2 days, then nothing. I don't get flu shots, and I'm supposedly in a "high risk" group age wise. I also know that 10/X the MDR of Vitamin C is just a waste of money and causes orange pee. The best dailies are not from a drugstore and in a plastic container. They aren't necessarily the most expensive, either. It pays to do one's homework. Too MUCH calcium is worse than not enough, and it has to be the right "form". Ne needs to have the proper "ratio" with magnesium to be effective. "Information overload" sometimes, sigh.

12:34AM PST on Jan 2, 2012

I read these articles but they tend to confuse me. Very few doctors agree on what is good.

In this case COQ10 was recommended and other doctors maintain it is ineffective and a waste of money. I'm well aware that like the food supply in North America, most supplements are probably just as suspect.

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Disclaimer: The views expressed above are solely those of the author and may not reflect those of
Care2, Inc., its employees or advertisers.

people are talking

I think a lot of people know what triggers their Acne and they still choose to eat these foods!

Thanks for sharing this information.

it's definitely marketing. there is just no such thing as a superfood. but it does make an excellent…

A very useful theme. Thank you for it.

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