Livestock-Eating Bear Popular on Facebook

A wild bear in northeastern Italy, weighing about 385 pounds, has awakened from hibernation and is very hungry, judging as he has eaten livestock from farms, such as chickens and even horses. Dino has a chip implanted in his skin so his movements are being tracked, and his ranging from meal to meal, whether it is natural or from a farm, is creating a dilemma. Local ranchers apparently are becoming vocal for the need to take the bear down. Bears have been reintroduced in the area because the numbers had been reduced so drastically over the years. Some aren’t too happy about some bears being brought back though.

The last time a bear that was reintroduced there, it ended badly with the bear being shot. Bruno was his name and he reportedly ate 33 sheep,  four domestic rabbits, one guinea pig, hens and some goats before he was killed.

Spiegel Online reports Dino the bear has 10,000 fans on Facebook. But do those fans make their living on farms, or understand the farming lifestyle? We all want wild animals to live freely, and safely, but it could be that the bear relocation project there has some issues to reconsider.

Neighboring Slovenia actually has a fairly large wild bear population and even has  a state-sanctioned annual bear hunt. That bear kill is not without controversy however, as the take each year has been challenged as too large. So having a few wild bears in the Italian Alps sourced from Slovenia appears to be a good idea, until they start wreaking havoc on local farmers.

Perhaps the region is too developed and populated with people and farms with livestock for wild bears to co-exist there. Who could blame the bears for treating penned animals as their own personal buffet if they are hungry and there aren’t as many natural, familiar food sources for them?

Note: The bear pictured stuffed and exhibited above is Bruno, not Dino who is still alive, for now.

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81 comments

Jennifer C.
Past Member 2 years ago

Thank you.

Aimee A.
Aimee A.3 years ago

Sad sad sad! Thoughts and prayers to Dino!

Michele Wilkinson

Thank you

K s Goh
KS Goh4 years ago

Thanks for the article.

Bon L.
Bon L.4 years ago

Thanks for the info.

June Bullied
june bullied5 years ago

R.I.P. Bruno, save Dino. come on people, dont you have enough land? give back to nature.

Richard C.
Richard C.5 years ago

Are you meat eaters going to kill all the wild animals just so you can eat meat. At least stop eating red meat and return land back to the wildlife. Stop supporting beef, lamb, veal, pork, industries, they are cruel and disgusting anyways and not good for you or the environment. There should be corridors of land set aside the allows wildlife to travel throughout thier land without interaction with humans. Better yet go vegetarian like many other people do, it's healthier and helps our world.

Alucard Dracul
Alucard Dracul5 years ago

this is the most logical and well thought out article ever on this site i wish other contributer's would get all there facts right before opening they're mouths so to speak but really this is a case of animal groups releasing animals in areas where there is not enough easily caught food to stop them raiding farms bears are lazy and will take the easiest route available this sort of thing happens all the time the release of animals needs to be thought out properly even finding farmers that are more willing to have bear raids than other farmers etc it's about time the people releasing these animals did their home work properly instead of expecting everyone to do what they want them to do who is going to pay the farmers for the lost live stock i don't see anyone volunteering and those who think guarding animals would do the job have you ever seen a bear what are you thinking or do you just want the farmer to buy more animals to feed the bear so many people on this site need to open their eyes and get realistic about so many things

Jewels S.
Jewels S.5 years ago

It is a fact there are too many people living in animal habitat.

gail d.
gail dair5 years ago

thanks for post