Mammography vs. Thermography

Many women today are concerned about the effects of accumulated radiation from routine mammograms. That concern is addressed by instead using thermography, which involves no radiation, and ultrasound when necessary.

A major asset of thermography is in the area of early detection and confirmation of breast cancers. In a German study, 54 percent of breast cancer patients were correctly diagnosed by history and physical examination. The number rose to 76 percent when mammography was added. However, when computerized regulation thermography was used, the accuracy of diagnosis rose to 92 percent.

With thermography, we do not have to rely on mammographies. And with the growing controversy on the radiation exposure from repeated mammographies, as well as the not insignificant percentage of false-negative results, thermographic screening becomes increasingly attractive. However, it is always important for women to do thorough manual evaluation of their own breast tissue, and to have the practitioner do likewise.

Computerized regulation thermography, or CRT, is an objective, non-invasive, and safe way of evaluating the body’s functions. CRT, also simply called thermography, is a medical imaging method that supplies information as meaningful as that obtained through an MRI or X ray. Current medical journals contain more than 12,000 citations and studies on thermography.

CRT evaluates body functions by a direct temperature measurement probe instead of by measuring thermal radiation. This scanning method is far more precise than any other thermographic system.

Each internal organ and gland has a corresponding point on the skin. A technician, holding a direct temperature measurement probe, measures the temperature of 68 points on the body. Measurements occur simply by touching a probe against these 68 points. There is no discomfort. Next, the patient partially disrobes, which gives the body a chance to cool. These same points are measured again 10 minutes later.

Adapted from Healthy Medicine, by Robert J. Zieve, M.D. (Bell Pond Books, 2005).

22 comments

Jeanne R
Jeanne R2 months ago

Thank you for sharing.

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Jeanne R
Jeanne R2 months ago

Thank you for sharing.

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Jeanne R
Jeanne R2 months ago

Thank you for sharing.

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Jeanne R
Jeanne R2 months ago

Thank you for sharing.

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Jeanne R
Jeanne R2 months ago

Thank you for sharing.

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Linda AWAY Be Back
Linda G6 years ago

I have heard many good things about thermal imaging but in my area it is very expensive and with no insurance I have not tried it yet. I would much prefer to not have mammograms.

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Lynn C.
Lynn C6 years ago

Thanks for letting us know there is an alternative.

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Gordana Roljic
Gordana Roljic6 years ago

good to know

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Gordana Roljic
Gordana Roljic6 years ago

thanx for article...

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Patricia Geller
Patricia Geller6 years ago

Good info, thanks.

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