Secrets to Creating a Child-Friendly Garden

Some people make it look so easy. On late summer afternoons, blogger Christine Chitnis heads to her community garden plot to tend her vegetables—toddler in tow. “This part of my day is so idyllic,” she says. “Vik is such an easygoing soul, he is happy to eat some dirt and hang out while I fuss with my plot.” Here are five of her secrets to creating a kid-friendly garden:

Photographs by Christine Chitnis.

Tip No. 1: Let go of your expectations. Kids want to “help,” and that means there will be plants that get uprooted, herbs that get over-watered, produce that is picked before its time, and pots that get knocked over, says Chitnis. All of which is a good thing.

“By letting kids help, and giving them the space to get messy and make mistakes, you will nurture their love of gardening,” she says.

Tip No. 2: Plant vegetables and fruit that your kids like—and some they don’t.

“Planting produce that your kids love is a no-brainer, but try planting a few things they claimed not to like,” Chitnis says. “Once they help it grow, and pick it straight from the vine, they may change their minds.”

Tip No: 3: Set yourself up for success by laying the groundwork, so to speak, for success. Growing vegetables in raised beds “is the best idea, in my humble opinion—the soil is so rich and the weeds so few,” she says.

Tip No. 4: Keep a journal, recording successes (and failures) that your kids can page through with you during the winter months. It will also remind you what you want to plant, come next year.

Tip No. 5: Make it a family affair. “We all help in the garden and with the chickens,” says Chitnis. Kids love chores that involve shovels, rakes, and other tools, not to mention hoses and watering cans.”

Tip No. 5: Make it a family affair. “We all help in the garden and with the chickens,” says Chitnis. Kids love chores that involve shovels, rakes, and other tools, not to mention hoses and watering cans.”

Looking for more ways to inspired your burgeoning little gardener? Check out these two posts of Gardenista: Garden Crafts for Children: Build an Insect House and For Kids Only: A Hidden Garden in Brooklyn.

38 comments

Kathy Perez
Kathy Johnson4 years ago

great tips

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JL A.
JL A4 years ago

good ideas

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Fi T.
Past Member 4 years ago

Good to start it from childhood

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Dale O.

Sounds marvellous, gardens and children are a wonderful mix.

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Ernie Miller
william Miller4 years ago

Thanks y niece loved help planting my garden this year and now is happy to help pick the spoils of our fun

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Terry V.
Terry V4 years ago

"secrets"??? tips or ideas would be better.

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Eva Daniher
Eva Daniher4 years ago

Thanks

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Bryna Pizzo
Bryna P4 years ago

Thank you for the ideas. I hope to have a garden to share with my grandaughter some day. :)

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Edo R.
Edo R4 years ago

Thank you for sharing!

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Vita Pagh
Vita P4 years ago

Thank you for good tips.

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