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Simple Ways to Create a Dog Friendly Garden

Simple Ways to Create a Dog Friendly Garden

Dog lovers know that dogs are curious creatures, which leads them to smell, taste, and eat almost anything they find including bark, gravel, mulch, plants, etc. We gardeners have to be careful of their curiosity when designing our gardens. Problems can occur if they ingest something they shouldn’t while out in the yard.

Curiosity can also lead them to eat something in the yard that may not hurt them, but that you just don’t want them to eat. This presents a dilemma for the dog-loving gardener because as much as you love your pet, you also love your garden and need to protect it from your pet too.

Here are some simple things you can do to protect both and to have a happy, healthy dog and garden.

First, think about the things that a dog needs and likes and create some “dog friendly” elements so that your garden isn’t a more attractive place than her own area is. This includes creating designated paths so your furry friend knows where it is okay to roam.

Usually a dog uses the same path over and over and can be easily defined since it is well worn. To make it more formally outlined, use pavers or some other type of solid hard-scape. Gravel, mulch, or bark is loose, and anything loose is just another tempting place for them to dig and bury things.

Another very tempting place to dig is any bare dirt area. And, as any gardener knows, it’s not only tempting to dogs, bare areas are also very inviting to weeds. Put in some pet-friendly plants, grasses, and ground cover to discourage both.

Other elements you can add include designating a separate area of your backyard for your dog to dig and play in. With consistency, if you only play with her in that area and leave her toys in that area, she will get the idea that that is her turf.

You can use raised beds and/or fencing, which is what my husband did for me when he put in my raised beds last summer. It has both a beautiful basket fence around the raised beds and a gate. Not only did it keep our dog out, it also looks nice, and created a separate vegetable area.

If you don’t have room to fence off a separate area, to protect plants from your dog, use tomato cages around them and around small tender plants. Even trellises and teepees will help keep them off the plants and so will growing plants close together; the dog would prefer to go around clumps of plants since it is easier.

If your dog is especially playful and nothing seems to stop her, consider putting your most delicate plants in containers, hanging baskets, or window boxes.

Aside from keeping them out of your beloved vegetables and flowers, one of the most important things you need to do is avoid planting things in your garden that are toxic or harmful to your best friend.

The ASPCA web site www.aspca.org/toxicplants has a complete list of toxic and harmful plants so make sure you check before you plant. For example, some very common plants that are on that list include castor beans, oleander, azalea, yew plant, foxglove, and rhododendron.

Also, think before planting spiny or thorny plants since they are at a level that can cause serious eye injuries to your dog. Take care of weeds or grasses that are overgrown since they can have foxtails or seed heads that are sharp, which can be harmful if your dog swallows or inhales them.

And, as if there weren’t already enough reasons to go organic, if you need another one, treating your lawn or garden with fertilizers, herbicides, or insecticides and fertilizers can be harmful to your dog if ingested. Always use nontoxic gardening products such as Sluggo or Sluggo Plus for snails and slugs.

Related:
10 Foods Poisonous to Pets
5 Healthy Recipes for Your Dog
The Greenest Dog (Cute Video)

Read more: Lawns & Gardens, Natural Pest Control, Nature, Pets, ,

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Judi Gerber

Judi Gerber is a University of California Master Gardener with a certificate in Horticultural Therapy. She writes about sustainable farming, local foods, and organic gardening for multiple magazines. Her book Farming in Torrance and the South Bay was released in September 2008.

63 comments

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10:58AM PDT on Oct 21, 2010

Gotta get to it my yard is bare having been taken over by my 2 dogs :)

12:52AM PDT on Aug 23, 2010

Good ideas to keep dogs happy and safe in the garden.

2:37AM PDT on Jul 25, 2010

Great advice, Thank you.
The raised vegetable beds are a great idea especially as the bones begin to creak. We eventually settled on a height of 50cm and a bed width of 160cm this made it easy to work to the centre of the bed. Length is up to you. We went with a solid floor that gave us 30cm of soil. The space below was filled with stone and rubble mostly from our ground and well compacted. Make sure you have sufficient drainage above the hard base. We then filled the beds with soil. What is great about this you are able to fill a bed with a soil type to suit the vegies we wanted to grow. A sandy soil for root crops and so on.

Make a difference, plant a tree.

5:17AM PDT on Jul 22, 2010

Thanks for the information. Will come in very handy. May of even prevented a trip to the vet!

4:33PM PDT on Jul 20, 2010

Really good advice. I wish it was not so hot outside. The pups could go out and play more often.

6:59PM PDT on Jun 8, 2010

thanks

3:23PM PDT on Jun 2, 2010

What fantastic ideas. I will be putting them in place to try and control two lovely boisterous boys, 6 and 7 years old ( a lab and a ridgeback/boxer cross). At present I have a portion of the garden fenced away from the rest for them with access to one door and they are inside dogs.

10:55AM PDT on May 28, 2010

Great ideas

4:33AM PDT on May 24, 2010

Useful

3:11PM PDT on May 21, 2010

Thanks for the tips!

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