START A PETITION 25,136,189 members: the world's largest community for good
START A PETITION
x

Snare those Slugs and Snails!

Snare those Slugs and Snails!

There’s a scene in the latest Harry Potter movie where Harry’s friend spits up slugs. Yuck! Doesn’t that just sum up the way most of us feel about slugs and snails? The very thought of the slimy little things is not a pretty one, and absolutely nobody wants them ruining their garden!

Stop destructive snails and slugs from snacking on your plants, but without using poisonous baits that can threaten the health of your pets and family. Alternative methods may take just a little patience, but with a bit of perseverance you will be able to rid your garden of these pesky creatures without using harmful chemicals.


  • Remove slugs and snails by hand. By night, use a flashlight and follow
    their shiny trails to find them.
  • Transport them somewhere far from your garden, (not your neighbor’s
    garden!) or squish or drown them in a jar of soapy water.
  • Wearing a face mask, spread natural or agricultural-grade diatomaceous
    earth over the soil in flower beds or around individual plants. Diatomaceous
    earth cuts the slugs and causes them to dehydrate. Reapply after each rain.
  • Deter snails and slugs by sprinkling cayenne pepper along their paths.
  • Place ceramic flowerpots upside-down to attract and trap snails and slugs
    in the shade. Overturn them and remove the snails daily until they are gone.
  • Water your garden and lawn in the morning. Slugs and snails travel at night
    more easily through wet plants.

Read more: Nature, Natural Pest Control

have you shared this story yet?

go ahead, give it a little love

Annie B. Bond

Annie is a renowned expert in non-toxic and green living. She was named one of the top 20 environmental leaders by Body and Soul Magazine and "the foremost expert on green living." - Body & Soul Magazine, 2009. Learn Annie's latest eco-friendly news on anniebbond.com, a website dedicated to healthy and green living.

Go to the Source

1,001 Old-Time Garden Tips : Timeless Bits of Wisdom on How to Grow Everything Organically, from the

Discover the secrets of old-time gardeners and their time-tested organic techniques to make a garden grow more beautiful and bountiful. "1,001 Old-Time Garden Tips" features an incredible selection of advice from successful 17th-, 18th-, 19th-, and early 20th-century gardeners on everything from how to read weather signs to how to improve soil quality, plus recipes for tasty dishes, drinks, and herbal seasonings.buy now

Great Garden Formulas : The Ultimate Book of Mix-It-Yourself Concoctions for Gardeners by Joan Benja

The most complete collection of garden secrets ever compiled, this book includes money-saving formulas made from household items; easy and safe pest control formulas; and easy-to-make herbal edibles, crafts, and home remedies.buy now

The New Organic Grower : A Master's Manual of Tools and Techniques for the Home and Market Gardener

This expansion of a now-classic guide originally published in 1989 is intended for the serious gardener or small-scale market farmer. It describes practical and sustainable ways of growing superb organic vegetables, with detailed coverage of scale and capital, marketing, livestock, the winter garden, soil fertility, weeds, and many other topics.buy now

The Encyclopedia of Organic Gardening by J. I. Rodale

Originally published in 1959, this is the book that started it all. J.I. Rodale, the founder of the organic gardening movement in the United States, compiled information from his visionary magazine, "Organic Gardening and Farming", into a 1,152-page masterpiece on the art and function of organic gardening. Not a word has been chnaged in this nostalgic, yet extraordinarily applicable work. buy now

61 comments

+ add your own
5:17AM PDT on Jul 2, 2013

I wish I had seen this yesterday as someone was asking me what to do about slugs and threatening to buy slug pellets which I promptly warned them against. The diatomaceous compost sounds like a good idea but you would have to use it sparingly as it is expensive. We have hedgehogs and birds visiting and they seem to do a good job

3:16AM PST on Jan 24, 2013

Thanks for the tips - I'll try the non-kill ones!

9:48AM PST on Jan 14, 2013

Slugs won't touch Gennessee but will apparently get drunk and drown themselves in Miller's beer. Laying boards in the garden and collecting them off the moist bottom each morning will allow them to be collected effectively. On a larger scale, damage control can become a costly factor. In some parts of the country they are as big as 6" long. In nature, animals and insects aggressively and fiercely protect their food supplies from others. It can come down to, "Which of us will be eating those tomatoes this year?" There may even be laws against transporting various species from one area to another.

8:21AM PDT on Jul 31, 2012

Fascinating, there are people with far too much time on their hands.
The only worry with balcony gardening is not slugs and snail but the diving bombing runs made by pigeons-splat.
When gardening on the farm there was enough room for everyone, plants, snails, slugs and humans.

8:21AM PDT on Jul 31, 2012

In addition to my previous brief comment, it is amazing how grumpy people get with each other on these sites, my, my-try breathing and counting to ten!
Even so, the comments here are relatively tepid compared to the slug fest going on at the In Defense Of Hunting article-or for us Canadians - defence. Wow, talk about vindictive comments!

5:23PM PDT on Jul 27, 2012

I like Lydia P.'s idea! - right on!

2:02AM PDT on Jul 16, 2012

I never kill them. I try to plant leafy green plants for them in one area of the garden, so they are happy there and don't eat my more precious plants.

2:00PM PDT on Jun 3, 2012

Sad to kill them & put salt on them.Move them to a park or somewhere safe.Snails are supposed to help cancer patients fight cancer cells according to a french study where they do eat snails.(Escargo)

2:34PM PDT on May 2, 2012

Useful tips.

6:19AM PDT on Apr 16, 2012

thanks

add your comment



Disclaimer: The views expressed above are solely those of the author and may not reflect those of
Care2, Inc., its employees or advertisers.

people are talking

I do tire of the vegan prostelytizing being thrown at me, especially when it comes to children. If y…

Loved this simple poem, and how true! What matters most to me right now is mitigating global warmin…

I love the authors sense of humour, I think she's coping well, good advice, thank you.

thanks for sharing--ir could help others

Story idea? Want to blog? Contact the editors!



Select names from your address book   |   Help
   

We hate spam. We do not sell or share the email addresses you provide.