Surprise: Your Face Could Hold the Clue to How Long you Might Live

Often, when I happen to tell people how old I am, it is amusing—and I must admit, flattering—to see their disbelieving reactions. I am blessed with what people call a “baby face,” and until now, I liked those compliments for the simple reason that they lifted my mood.

Today, I chanced upon a study that makes me realize that my heart should quite literally be glad that I look younger than I am. The study says a “young” face could be an indicator of longer life.

Dutch scientists conducted this interesting study on 514 adults with an average age of 63. This was the first-ever study that tried to establish a possible link between the rate at which skin ages, and the possibility of heart disease. They found that men and women who have a “baby face” tend to have lower blood pressure, which is directly linked to a higher risk of heart disease.The study, published in the Journal of Gerontology, affirms that women who look more than two years younger than they actually are can take comfort in the fact that their heart is healthier than their older-looking contemporaries.

The study underlines the fact that it is not the number of wrinkles on your face that affects your resistance to cardiovascular problems. Those with high blood pressure have a certain “sag” to their skin, and hypertension is largely triggered by an unhealthy lifestyle. In addition to affecting the heart, high blood pressure can also cause kidney problems, memory loss, poor vision, metabolic syndrome and strokes.

So what does this mean for those of us who have older or  more mature-looking skin? Scientists who conducted the study say this should encourage these individuals to start following a healthier lifestyle. By making simple changes such as getting adequate sleep, eating balanced meals, and exercising daily, it is possible to shed extra weight, let go of pent up stress, and acquire a fresh, young face!

Related:
9 Ways Fingernails Can Reflect Your Health

 

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74 comments

Tammy D.
Tammy D.2 years ago

Hmm, not very 'scientific', is it? Would be good to know what exactly constitutes a 'baby face'. I have always looked younger than my age (much to my annoyance as a young girl and woman, and much to my delight as a middle-aged--yikes--woman), but I don't think anyone would claim that I have a 'baby' face. Baby face to me means more fat around the cheeks.

Aside from the reasons listed, isn't this kind of common sense? Those who look younger in the face tend to protect their skin from sun, exercise and eat healthier. Those people have a certain radiance that defies age. Also, I have to say, people who don't use cosmetics look tons younger in their old age. Make-up really does not make women prettier!

Maria Cristina A.

That study, if it addresses just the factors related here, is too faulty. Even the study itself points a few items that weren't discussed here at all.
I'm guessing there's more to this, so I'm disapointed the author only focused what would look great in a beauty article.

Teresa Wlosowicz
Teresa W.2 years ago

I look young, so I should live long. :-)

Michael H.
Mike H.2 years ago

I'm not buying the "baby face" theory

Val M.
Val M.2 years ago

Thanks

Denise Morley
Denise Morley2 years ago

Interesting, thanks :)

Nimue Pendragon
Nimue Pendragon2 years ago

hmmmm

Kristin Love
Kristin Love2 years ago

healthy lifestyle. coconut oil. seriously, besides a "goat's milk" face cream that i use every other day, i slather my face with oooooodles of extra virgin unrefined organic coconut oil a couple times a day, right out of a big ole container. it's completely healed my excema on my hands too! i'm 52 and most people think i'm much younger....which is fine by me! :)

Alicia N.
Alicia N.2 years ago

mmmm very interesting-Thanks Lucky girl!

JL A.
JL A.2 years ago

good to know