Sweet Treatment for Damaged Hair

Here is a one-ingredient formula that may surprise you, but it has amazing nourishing and repairing properties for damaged hair.

If you spent too many hours this summer in a pool, in the sun, or getting tangles from harsh salty sea air–or if you have damage from bleaching or blow-drying–this sweet solution will help restore your hair to soft, shiny, bouncy glory.

The secret is blackstrap molasses. It may sound kind of sticky and gooey to use, but it smells sweet and it will give your damaged locks a nourishing treat.

Simply massage about 1/4 to 1/2 cup of blackstrap molasses (depending on the length of your hair) into your tresses, then cover with a shower cap and allow it to set as long as possible (for an hour or even more, if you can.)

Rinse with warm water.

By Annie B. Bond

32 comments

Elisa Faulkner- Uriarte
Elisa F3 years ago

I remember my mom telling me that she used to use blackstrap molasses on her hair as a young girl. Guess mom was on to something. Who knew? LOL

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Lydia Weissmuller Price

I sure will try this...I have very fine, dry hair. Thank you.

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Debbi Ryan
Deb Ryan4 years ago

thanks

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Betsy M.
Betsy M4 years ago

Wikipedia defines blackstrap (an American term) as the 3d grade of molasses gotten from processing sugar cane. It is the darkest & strongest flavored with the highest mineral content, least sugar. It can be sulphured or unsulphured.
OTOH Sorgum "molasses" is really syrup refined from sorgum.
I was surprised to read that they make something called mollases from sugar beets as well, so I will be careful to read labels and make sure I am getting cane molasses.

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Danuta Watola
Danuta W4 years ago

Thanks for the article.

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K s Goh
KS Goh5 years ago

Thanks for the article.

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Michele Wilkinson

Thank you

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Melissah C.
Melissah C5 years ago

thanks

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Carol A.
carol Adolphson6 years ago

brair rabbit brand is great for molasses cookies.

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Carol A.
carol Adolphson6 years ago

what is the difference between blackstrap molasses and other kinds of molasses?

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