The Mystery of Seeing

David, who is now in his thirties, was born a twin, but he had a tiny genetic heart defect that his twin lacked. “I was lucky, and my heart was repaired soon after I was born,” he relates. “There was no reason for me to be treated any differently from my brother.

But I remember from early on my mother’s anxious looks whenever I tried to do anything she thought was risky. My brother didn’t get those looks, and by the time we were four or five, he was considered the strong one while I was the sensitive one.

There’s a lot more to raising kids than looking at them, of course. My parents did their best to provide equally for us and to love us the same way. I accepted that I was the fragile twin, and as we grew up, it amazed me how wrong my parents had been.

My brother didn’t turn out to be a great success. I, who always expected to be on the sidelines, grew up to get scholarships, a much better education, and a teaching job at a good university. “It took me years to realize that we were both shaped to become what we are.”

This is one example of seeing, but many others come to mind. We look at those we love entirely differently from people we don’t love. Your gaze doesn’t fall passively. It conveys meaning, it makes another person aware of something. In other words, your awareness speaks to theirs, and that is enough to create changes in the brain, leading to changes elsewhere in the body.

There’s no limit to the result. The secret is to create positive effects instead of negative ones. Seeing is active. You send out energy, and take in energy from others. You can decide to see with love and understanding, acceptance and tolerance. When you do, these qualities exert a force on your surroundings that benefits everything and everyone.

Adapted from Reinventing The Body, Resurrecting The Soul, by Deepak Chopra (Harmony Books, 2009).

33 comments

Bon L.
Bon L5 years ago

Thanks for the info.

Jewels S.
Jewels S6 years ago

This is why it is beneficial to practice conscious living. Reminds me of an email I used to get It said "smile, you don't know who is falling in love with your smile"

Janice P.
Janice P6 years ago

This article is very interesting and very true. Don't we do the same with hearing? Two people can say the exact same things, in the exact same way, but what we hear can often depends upon our own relationship with, and perception of, each person individually. Our senses are quite interactive in so very many ways and can cause differing results (for both other people and ourselves), depending upon our own internal precepts and expectations.

Jennifer Cockayne
Past Member 6 years ago

This is very insightful. Thank you.

Jennifer E.
Jennifer E6 years ago

Be genuine in how you approach everyone and it comes back to you, I think.

Eileen P.
Eileen P6 years ago

thank-you.......nicely put........

Wendy Benay Watson
Wendy Watson6 years ago

THANK YOU DEEPAK. I WAS BORN WITH CHILDHOOD MUSCULAR DISTORPHY AND ALTHOUGH I GREW OUT OF IT AND TOOK DANCE, MODERN JAZZ AND BALLET LESSONS, IT HAS MADE ITS MARK ON MY BODY AS A MID AGE WOMAN.
MY MOTHER CONSIDERED ME STUPIED AND I BELIEVED IT FOR A WHILE. I HAD A'S AND B'S BUT SHE STILL PUT ME IN SPECIAL ED. CLASSES AND HELD ME BACK IN 2ND AGAINST TEACHER BECAUSE I WAS A BIT SLOW IN READING.
I NOW AM SUCCESSFUL CAREER, AWARDS FOR ORAL AND WRITTEN COMMUNICATIONS. WRITE POETRY AND COOK BOOK.
I LOVE TO READ ANYTHING AND KNOWLEDGE IS A JOY FOR ME.

Rose Marie
Rose Marie6 years ago

Seeing the highest potential in all is especially important in teaching...I have seen students blossom and excel when the teacher continually called them all her 'stars'

Rose Marie
Rose Marie6 years ago

I remember reading once that Deepak Chopra suggested greeting everyone one you meet with the word "Namaste" - even if you say it silently while looking someone in the eyes - this article reminds me to start doing this again. Thank you

Marilyn L.
Marilyn L6 years ago

Chris S I totally agree. :-)