START A PETITION 25,136,189 members: the world's largest community for good
START A PETITION
x

Travel with Daydreams

Travel with Daydreams

While most of us cultivated the fine art of daydreaming as an escape from boredom in school (a practice which serves some of us well at work, too!), daydreams can be used to bring us to new places, teach us more about ourselves, and enrich our lives.

Your daydreams are magical passports. Here‘s how you can travel with them:

1. Find a place and time where and when you can do nothing. This kind of daydreaming requires your full attention, so find a place and time in which you have no responsibilities. Unlike ordinary daydreaming, this is not about escaping from something. It is about going to something.

2. Close your eyes. If you have your own way to relax, feel free to employ it, but definitely close your eyes. Our eyesight can be a distraction, and we don’t want to be distracted from our daydreaming. You might want to take a few deep breaths, inhaling slowly through the nose and exhaling slowly through the mouth.

3. Think of something you have wanted to do and have not yet done. Don’t just think about it–actively imagine what you want. The more specific the images, the better.

4. Do what you have wanted to do. Here’s the key. In a dream we can do anything, we can be anywhere. We can travel through time and space. We are not bound by logic or practicality. We can visit the dead, speak to the unborn. There are no limits here other than those that you impose upon yourself.

Again, be as concrete as you can be. If, for example, you’ve wanted to visit France, be specific. France is a large place, but the waterfront, at, say, Marseilles is more specific. I’ve never been there, but I can conjure up a breeze from the sea and the smell of fish. Which leads to…

5. Pay attention to all of your senses. The problem with visualization alone is that it focuses on one of the five senses–the sense of sight. We do more than see when we dream. We feel, and sometimes we smell and touch. Surely in our dreams our sense of sight is foremost–that’s how we’ve been trained. But in a daydream we can use all our senses.

In my Marseilles daydream, I’d allow myself to imagine not only the sight of the harbor but also the smell of the fish, the feeling of the sea breeze on my skin, and the sound of the seagulls. The more senses, the merrier the daydream.

6. Let yourself explore. Now that you’ve reached the place where you’ve wanted to go–explore. Walk, fly, swim if you want to.

7. Do this more than once. Daydreaming takes practice. The more we do it, the better we get at it. Once again, more of what we call daydreaming is about getting away from a particular situation. In imaginative daydreaming we create something to go toward. It takes practice. The sky’s the limit!

Read more: Spirit, Guidance, Self-Help

Adapted from The World Dream Book, by Sarvananda Bluestone (Inner Traditions, 2002). Copyright (c) 2002 by Sarvananda luestone. Reprinted by permission of Inner Traditions.
Adapted from The World Dream Book, by Sarvananda Bluestone (Inner Traditions, 2002).

have you shared this story yet?

go ahead, give it a little love

Annie B. Bond

Annie is a renowned expert in non-toxic and green living. She was named one of the top 20 environmental leaders by Body and Soul Magazine and "the foremost expert on green living." - Body & Soul Magazine, 2009. Learn Annie's latest eco-friendly news on anniebbond.com, a website dedicated to healthy and green living.

Go to the Source

The World Dream Book

Use the wisdom of world cultures to uncover your dream power.buy now

10 comments

+ add your own
10:04PM PDT on May 1, 2013

Thank you for sharing.

10:03PM PDT on May 1, 2013

Thank you for sharing.

10:01PM PDT on May 1, 2013

Thank you for sharing.

10:00PM PDT on May 1, 2013

Thank you for sharing.

9:59PM PDT on May 1, 2013

Thank you for sharing.

12:59AM PST on Jan 27, 2013

Thank you :)

11:08AM PDT on Sep 19, 2012

worth trying

5:04AM PST on Feb 7, 2012

Thanks for the article.

3:16PM PST on Jan 27, 2011

Great article. I find that daydreaming is a great escape, though temporary, from the world and its troubles and my own.

9:38AM PST on Feb 2, 2010

I am so excited to try it, today.

add your comment



Disclaimer: The views expressed above are solely those of the author and may not reflect those of
Care2, Inc., its employees or advertisers.

people are talking

As a 70-year cat person, I have to reserve judgment. The photo to me does not reveal a cat expressi…

I think this is great but it might be a bit tough for children who are easily distracted.

Petition gladly signed & shared!!! *~*

Thank you for sharing this information.

Story idea? Want to blog? Contact the editors!



Select names from your address book   |   Help
   

We hate spam. We do not sell or share the email addresses you provide.