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Two “New” Eating Disorders

Two “New” Eating Disorders

If you’re interested in the psychology of eating, you’ve probably heard about a couple of newly identified “disorders” being discussed by health professionals.  You can read about this here.  The first is called adult selective eating.  Those who suffer from it limit their diet to a very narrow range of foods, mostly light colored foods popular among children, like chicken fingers and fries, though they don’t seem to be overly concerned with body image.  Professionals speculate that it may be a manifestation of obsessive compulsive disorder.

The second “new disorder” is called orthorexia, where individuals form their eating habits around being overly concerned with healthy eating.  Sufferers may limit their diets to the point that they are actually malnourished.  Some professionals suspect that orthorexia may be a stepping stone to anorexia or bulimia.

So what to make of these “new disorders?”  Are they actually disorders at all?  If so, are they akin to anorexia, bulimia, and obesity?  And for that matter, are anorexia, bulimia actually disorders, per se?

I feel that anorexia, bulimia, and obesity are not quite disorders, because it’s about the emotional and psychological state of the sufferer, not the food.  Those who experience eating “disorders” have developed their habits as a response to sometimes complex emotional struggles.  The eating patterns, therefore, are not causing the problem, but are a result of it.  The “disorder” is a manifestation of unresolved emotional and psychological issues.  We all have baggage – it’s just more intense with some people, and each individual expresses his or her baggage in a unique way.

An “eating disorder,” then, is just an expression of baggage.  Furthermore, the term “disorder” implies that there’s something wrong with the sufferer, which simply isn’t true.  His or her relationship with food may cause a great deal of pain and unhappiness, but it doesn’t mean there’s something wrong or disordered about that person.  What it means is that the sufferer isn’t yet relating to himself or herself with true authenticity, and doesn’t yet have a genuine sense of self-worth.  The path of personal growth is never easy, and when someone has an “eating disorder,” it just means that they’re experiencing a particularly difficult stage of the path.  The old saying is true – life is a journey.  We’re all journeying through life, and that’s what an eating disorder is – part of the journey.  To be sure, eating disorders are uniquely recognizable journeys because they are dramatic and because they are closely related to such issues as control, body image, and self-worth.  But just the fact that they’re unique and recognizable doesn’t necessarily make them “disorders.”

So what about adult selective eating and orthorexia?  Like bulimia, anorexia, and obesity, I don’t think they’re necessarily “disorders.”   Furthermore, to lump them in with previously recognized “disorders” isn’t accurate because, although they surely stem from very real emotional struggles, they’re not related to body image and self-worth in the same way.

We humans like to categorize and label things because it makes it easier for us to understand and talk about them and, ultimately, to make sense of the universe.  While that may be convenient and even necessary in everyday communication, we need to recognize that many of our labels and categories are arbitrary.  When we fall into the trap of thinking that our labels have a real existence independent of our use of them, then we reduce and minimize the depth and complexity of reality.  Eating disorders are no exception.  Of course, many sufferers of eating disorders experience similar types of emotional trauma, and resort to eating disorders as methods of coping with similar types of struggles.  And it is important for doctors and mental health professionals to recognize that, in order to better understand and help their patients.  But by lumping all people with particular eating habits into a group and saying they have a “disorder,” we tend to ignore the complex emotional and psychological fabric that led to those habits, and the uniqueness of each person’s experience of them.  And by labeling individuals as “disordered,” we only serve to lower their self-confidence and make it even more difficult for them to establish a sense of self-worth.

Related:
New Eating Disorder Takes Healthy Food Too Far
Why We Fear Food and How to Stop
Stress Responses and Eating: What They Have in Common

Read more: Diet & Nutrition, General Health, Health, Mental Wellness,

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Sarah Cooke

Sarah Cooke is a writer living in California. She is interested in organic food and green living. Sarah holds an M.F.A. in Creative Writing from Naropa University, an M.A. in Humanities from NYU, and a B.A. in Political Science from Loyola Marymount University. She has written for a number of publications, and she studied Pastry Arts at the Institute for Culinary Education. Her interests include running, yoga, baking, and poetry. Read more on her blog.

104 comments

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12:42AM PST on Dec 24, 2012

Thank you :)

1:57AM PDT on Apr 23, 2012

Thanks for sharing.

2:38PM PDT on Aug 11, 2011

A l;ot of it is about focusing on the wrong things. Is it more importent to have and "A" or to be a good neighbor? Is it more importent to be thin than healthy? Is it more importent to eat health food than to be friendly? If our food is poison let's do something about it!

6:24PM PDT on Aug 3, 2011

I agree. People who are going through such experiences need the most compassion out of anyone. Love thy neighbor as you would thyself.

5:31PM PDT on Jul 25, 2011

This article is ridiculous. Yes, they ARE disorders!

6:26AM PDT on Jun 10, 2011

Thanks for the article.

12:18PM PDT on Jun 7, 2011

some interesting points. thanks

1:01PM PDT on Jun 6, 2011

Saying eating disorders are not about food is like saying alcoholism is not about alcohol. There is an addictive chemistry to binging, starving and throwing up that is not just about "emotional and psychological pain" --
Like alcoholism, there is almost always an underlying emotional problem, but once the tipping point is reached, it's not enough to treat the pain. I don't know about these two new classifications, but I have experience with bingeing and the memory of the urge to binge is still so vivid for me now, twenty years into recovery. It was such a relief when binge eating disorder finally joined anorexia and bulimia as a recognized illness. The physiological/neurological nature of these addictions is just now coming into focus with research -- It's all good news.

1:01PM PDT on Jun 6, 2011

Saying eating disorders are not about food is like saying alcoholism is not about alcohol. There is an addictive chemistry to binging, starving and throwing up that is not just about "emotional and psychological pain" --
Like alcoholism, there is almost always an underlying emotional problem, but once the tipping point is reached, it's not enough to treat the pain. I don't know about these two new classifications, but I have experience with bingeing and the memory of the urge to binge is still so vivid for me now, twenty years into recovery. It was such a relief when binge eating disorder finally joined anorexia and bulimia as a recognized illness. The physiological/neurological nature of these addictions is just now coming into focus with research -- It's all good news.

10:15AM PDT on Jun 5, 2011

Not to mention the eating disorder EDNOS (eating disorder not otherwise specified) which is where lots of people fit in who don't quite catagorize in those eating disorders.

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Disclaimer: The views expressed above are solely those of the author and may not reflect those of
Care2, Inc., its employees or advertisers.

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