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What’s Really In Potato Chips?

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What’s Really In Potato Chips?

To understand the nature of Pringles and other stackable chips, forget the notion that they come from actual potatoes in any recognizable way.

The Pringles Company (in an effort to avoid taxes levied against “luxury foods” like chips in the UK) once even argued that the potato content of their chips was so low that they are technically not even potato chips.

So if they’re not made of potatoes, what are they exactly?

The process begins with a slurry of rice, wheat, corn, and potato flakes that are pressed into shape.

This dough-like substance is then rolled out into an ultra-thin sheet cut into chip-cookies by a machine.

According to io9:

“The chips move forward on a conveyor belt until they’re pressed onto molds, which give them the curve that makes them fit into one another.

Those molds move through boiling oil … Then they’re blown dry, sprayed with powdered flavors, and at last, flipped onto a slower-moving conveyor belt in a way that allows them to stack.

From then on, it’s into the cans … and off towards the innocent mouths of the consumers.”

I suspect nearly everyone reading this likely enjoys the taste of potato chips. However, they are clearly one of the most toxic processed foods you can eat—whether they’re made from actual potato shavings or not.

Potato Chips are Loaded with Cancer-Causing Chemical

One of the most hazardous ingredients in potato chips is not intentionally added, but rather is a byproduct of the processing.

Acrylamide, a cancer-causing and potentially neurotoxic chemical, is created when carbohydrate-rich foods are cooked at high temperatures, whether baked, fried, roasted or toasted. Some of the worst offenders include potato chips and French fries, but many foods cooked or processed at temperatures above 212°F (100°C) may contain acrylamide.

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Read more: Diet & Nutrition, Eating for Health, Food, Health, , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Photo Courtesy Of: iStockphoto/Thinkstock

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Dr. Mercola

Dr. Mercola has been passionate about health and technology for most of his life. As a doctor of osteopathic medicine, he treated many thousands of patients for over 20 years. In the mid 90’s he integrated his passion for natural health with modern technology via the internet and developed a website, Mercola.com to spread the word about natural ways to achieve optimal health.

115 comments

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6:11AM PST on Feb 12, 2014

very good article,thank you

2:22PM PST on Dec 11, 2012

too many pages to read, yes chips are bad, but there's more to life than quantity.....there has to be a balance and if someone wants to include a respectable amount of potato chips for quality I won't lecture them.........now if they are way overweight, diabetic, hyperlipidemic, atherosclerotic I will discuss with them better choices.....

3:07AM PDT on May 31, 2012

"I am an ignorant potato chip eater and refuse to pay attention to this article."

This. Also, I don't eat Pringles anymore, only chips made of actual potatoes.

7:02AM PST on Feb 5, 2012

Is this just for the pringles types? or our regular, tasty type?

8:20PM PST on Jan 23, 2012

Thanks.

11:58PM PST on Jan 8, 2012

Interesting artilce!

9:44AM PST on Dec 28, 2011

Hmm. Isn't basically everything bad for you? I'll try to cut back on potato chips and French fries, but that's mainly because I want to eat healthier.

6:18AM PST on Dec 18, 2011

Basically, anything cooked contains carcinogens, as do a number of raw foods, such as peanuts with aflatoxin. You CANNOT live on our planet and not be exposed to carcinogens.

1:40AM PST on Dec 14, 2011

I am an ignorant potato chip eater and refuse to pay attention to this article.

9:51AM PST on Dec 11, 2011

hmmmm, think i have to stop eating these "potato chips"

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