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Which Meditation Technique is Right for You?

For a breakdown of some of the meditation techniques listed below, and exactly how to do them, the above below gives a good outline (skip to 1:10).

The data is in, and meditation works; not only does it help us live happier, less stressful lives, but it has measurable effects on physical health too. But if you’ve tried and (feel like you’ve) failed at meditating, it might be because you haven’t found the right meditation type for you. Below, you’ll find seven different ways “in” to a meditation practice; the benefits of each type are similar once you are practicing regularly — whether you find your way into meditation via walking and chanting, taking a class from a Transcendental Meditation teacher, or via meditation paired with your existing faith.

The most important part of meditation is not doing it a certain way, wearing particular clothes while doing it, or being in a specific place — or whatever your preconception of the “right” way to meditate is. It’s about finding what works with your life. Unlike a spin class, there are no rules you have to follow (though it’s useful to get a grounding in how other people meditate). There is only the regular practice and sticking with it, day-by-day. Think of meditation more like making a positive, life-long shift to a healthy eating, rather than a specific diet program (with celebrity endorsement and a thick book) that you follow for a month and then abandon. A truly beneficial meditation practice will take time and persistence.

So check out the styles of meditation below, and try them out — play with what works for you, and what doesn’t. Don’t be rigid about what meditation is, or looks like, or what you think it’s going to feel like. Ask yourself questions: Do you like to move, or does stillness work better for you? How about vocalizations? Do you want to focus on something or nothing? Your particular way into meditation may be different, but the stress relief, reduced anger, feelings of well-being, lowered blood pressure, and other benefits are available to everyone.

Once again, for a breakdown of some of the meditation techniques, and exactly how to do them, the above below gives a good outline (skip to 1:10).

Focused meditation is an umbrella term for any kind of meditation that includes focus on some aspect of the five senses, though visualizations are the most popular. Focusing on an image of a flower, a flame, or moving water are all ways to keep the mind gently focused so you are less likely to become distracted. You can also try concentrating on the feel of something — your fingers against each other, the way your breath feels moving in and out of your body, or the alignment of your spine. Focusing on a simple sound (a gentle gong, a bell, or music) or sounds from nature are another option.

Guided meditation is a focused meditation that is led by someone other than yourself and usually includes one or more of the techniques in focus meditation, above. You will get led through breathing instructions and some kind of visualization, body scan, or sound, or perhaps a mantra (see below).

Spiritual meditation is interchangeable with what most of us understand as prayer. If you are already part of a spiritual tradition, this may be an easier way into meditation, because you have already been practicing some elements of it. You can try it as an extension of what you already do in your place of worship if being in the church, sanctuary, mosque, hall or synagogue helps you dive into a quieter, more reflective state, or you can conjure up that feeling at home or in another place. Start with the words you have heard or said yourself, but instead of stopping at the end of a prayer or song, keep sitting quietly. You can ask a question and listen for an answer — sometimes people feel that an answer comes from outside of them; or you can enumerate what you are grateful for. Use your experience of prayer to access that quiet, meditative mind space.

Mantra meditation is when you use a sound or a set of sounds, repetitively, to enter and stay within the meditative state. It may seem like a contradiction to make noise when meditating, because many people have the idea that meditation equals silence, but that’s not the case at all, and mantras have a long history within the tradition. Of course, you can chant quietly, or even whisper your set of words, draw them out, make them more sing-songy, or even quite loud. You can say them in your head and maintain outer silence. You can choose a word or words in any language: (Peace and love and happiness, for example), or a sound like “Ohm.” You can make up sounds or words if you like or take them from another language; the sound or words you choose are really up to you and are simply a way to prevent distracting thoughts.

Transcendental Meditation (often abbreviated as TM by practitioners) is the type that’s most likely been studied by scientists when you hear about the various physical and mental benefits to meditation. With over 5 million practitioners worldwide, it is considered the most popular form of meditation, with the bonus being that it is usually easy to find free or low-cost classes in most places. It is a little more formalized than some of the other meditation types mentioned here, but it useful for beginning or exploring meditation if you are new to it. According to their site, TM is: “… a simple, natural, effortless procedure practiced 20 minutes twice each day while sitting comfortably with the eyes closed. It’s not a religion, philosophy, or lifestyle.”

Movement meditations are exactly what they sound like; instead of sitting quietly, you get to move around the room, the house, a woodsy path, or the garden (or wherever) — usually in a relatively simple and calming way. Walking meditation, most types of yoga, gardening, and even basic housecleaning tasks can be moving meditations. This meditation type is great for people who already sit all day at work and want to move and meditate when not at a desk, and for those people who find sitting still to be a distraction from being able to meditate at all.

Mindfulness is a type of meditation that is an ongoing part of life, rather than a separate activity. A great way to address stress in the moment it is happening, and over time becomes more like a mental skill than a time separate from the rest of life. It can be easier to get into a mindful state of mind if one has already been practicing meditation separately.

Photo: Victor Camilo/flickr

article by Starre Vartan

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69 comments

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1:00PM PST on Nov 18, 2014

@Susan R. - that's what really matters; that it works for you. Just keep in mind that what works for you isn't necessarily the right answer for anyone else. "Straight is the path and narrow is the way" means only you can take the journey you must make for yourself. The same is true for everyone else.

9:23AM PST on Nov 18, 2014

I like these two.Watching your breath & Jesus.I find them relaxing.

3:05AM PDT on Jul 20, 2014

I have tried several types, but I find that guided meditation works best for me. I used to meditate regularly, and felt the benefits. I have stopped and want to get back into it.

anyone who is thinking about it, just try

4:01PM PDT on Jul 12, 2014

Thanx for sharing ;0)

10:37AM PDT on Jul 9, 2014

New names to old methods...

8:01AM PDT on May 13, 2014

I really appreciate the effects of my renewed practice! TY

5:59AM PDT on May 5, 2014

THANK YOU. SOMETHING TO THINK ABOUT.

10:54AM PDT on May 4, 2014

I've certainly been looking for a meditation coach. Problem is, I live in the "buckle of the Bible Belt" and few openly admit to even something so simple as "I'm not a Christian". For the last 10 years, I've been using brainwave entrainment, guided meditation, Schumanic Resonance recordings, and many other things. Based on this, I'm thinking that I might as well give up - what seems most likely to work for me (from the list above) is the one thing I can't do - movement. I'm a US Army veteran who is permanently disabled - before the injury I LOVED to be outdoors and moving around. Now I can't even stand up for more than 5 minutes.

7:48PM PDT on Apr 26, 2014

thanks

12:21AM PDT on Apr 25, 2014

Thank you, I certainly needed more clarification on the types of meditation. I've been beginning to think that some of my problems with meditation are not finding the right type.

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