New Wild Wolf Pups Photographed in Oregon

In early July, a remote trail camera set up by the Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife photographed wild wolf pups in Northeast Oregon. The new pups are part of the Imnaha pack in the Imnaha Wildlife Management Area. The Imnaha pack has one breeding pair of  wolves, and about 14 wolves in total. Although the total number could be higher, if the cameras did not record all the pups, or potentially lower, considering the alpha male has been missing for some time and may be deceased. Oregon’s other wolf pack has just four, and are not thought to be reproducing. Wolves have their litters in April usually. Pups leave the den to start playing and walking in June. Litter sizes vary from four to six.

The State of Oregon is due to review their wolf conservation plan this year.  Wolves are protected as endangered animals there. Livestock producers there are not allowed to harm wolves, unless they have a permit. Wolves were not reintroduced in Oregon. They roamed there from neighboring states.

Imnaha Wolf Pack in Winter

Oregon Public Broadcasting History of Wolves in the West

Image Credit: Public Domain

119 comments

Patricia M.
Patricia M.3 years ago

Wolves are protected as endangered animals there. Livestock producers there are not allowed to harm wolves, unless they have a permit. Wolves were not reintroduced in Oregon. They roamed there from neighboring states.

As is should well be in every state in America and every province of Canada!!!!! Livestockers, stop you greed and theiving of grazing lands & leave all the wolves and wildlife alone, you selfish cowards!!!

Teresa Wlosowicz
Teresa W.3 years ago

beautiful

Lisa Eveland
Lisa Eveland4 years ago

great news

colleen p.
colleen p.4 years ago

which subspeciese?

Bruce S.
Bruce S.4 years ago

"Wolves are protected as endangered animals there. Livestock producers there are not allowed to harm wolves, unless they have a permit."

You can always tell when a bunch of A-holes have gotten together. They make rules such as "not allowed to harm wolves....unless they have a permit."

I'd like to question some wolves and ask them how that rule is working out for them. Does anyone reading this believe that wolves have any "real" protection in Oregon?

Wanda Kennington
Wanda Kennington4 years ago

I would rather see a wolf than a nutty gun toting hunter

Dwight Pettegrove
Dep P.4 years ago

Unfortunately, the people who feel it's so necessary to kill em all, are incapable as usual of changing their views. They wanna come trudging back to their homes and wives who are there waiting for them with a warm meal and a beer so they can tell them all the important events that led up to the kill. Brave sods.

Js Angela
Js Angela4 years ago

I love wolves so much, sorry to see them hunted and trapped. I am so happy when they are free in wild nature, safe and protected... and loved. I wish to wolves to be more and more loved :-)

Margriet Myngheer

Woehoe, a wolf has been seen in the south of Belgium, the first in many years!!! They are coming back :)

Geoffrey S.

Wolves are a sustainable part of nature. Humans are not living a sustianable, intelligent existanse, reproducing logrithmically until all resources are totally out of balance, effecting all life on earth. If humans are aloud to get a toe hold and reproduce uncontrolled they will depleat all the food sources on earth ! A bounty should be placed on humans to control their uncontrolled breeding to protect the healthy balance of the environment on earth. All in favor HOWL with me !!!
It's time to wake up humans, your distroying the earth. Your not sustainable ! If your not part of the solution, your part of the problem. I have seen the enemy ! And it is Us !!!!!!!!!
Geoffrey