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Red Tide May Be Taking Toll on Animals


Animals  (tags: animals, AnimalWelfare, death, protection, wildanimals, wildlife, sadness, endangered, environment, habitat, Red Tide )

Cher
- 2366 days ago - nwfdailynews.com
Red tide could be becoming a silent killer along the Emerald Coast. On Thursday, Emerald Coast Wildlife Refuge officials responded to a call about a dead sea turtle, a dead dolphin and eight struggling birds.



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Comments

Cher C. (1462)
Friday October 26, 2007, 2:24 pm
The term "red tide" is often used in the United States of America to describe a particular type of algal bloom common to the eastern Gulf of Mexico, and is also called "Florida red tide". This type of bloom is caused by a species of dinoflagellate known as Karenia brevis, and these blooms occur almost annually along Florida waters. The density of these organisms during a bloom can exceed tens of millions of cells per liter of seawater, and often discolor the water a deep reddish-brown hue.
It is unclear what causes red tides; their occurrence in some locations appears to be entirely natural[1], while in others they appear to be a result of human activities[2] The frequency and severity of algal blooms in some parts of the world have been linked to increased nutrient loading from human activities. In other areas, algal blooms are a seasonal occurrence resulting from coastal upwelling, a natural result of the movement of certain ocean currents[3]. The growth of marine phytoplankton is generally limited by the availability of nitrates and phosphates, which can be abundant in agricultural run-off as well as coastal upwelling zones. Coastal water pollution produced by humans and systematic increase in sea water temperature have also been implicated as contributing factors in red tides. Other factors such as iron-rich dust influx from large desert areas such as the Saharan desert are thought to play a major role in causing red tides[
 

. (0)
Friday October 26, 2007, 4:55 pm
Oh no! Noted with sadness for all the marine life and water birds.
 
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