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Say Goodbye to Surgical Stitches and Staples


Health & Wellness  (tags: GOOD NEWS, Israel, IonMed, welds surgical incisions using cold plas )

Beth
- 406 days ago - israel21c.org
Women giving birth by Caesarean section could be the first to benefit from a revolutionary Israeli invention for closing surgical incisions without stitches or staples. The technique also promises to leave patients less prone to infection and scarring.



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Beth S. (323)
Tuesday July 9, 2013, 2:48 pm
Plasma is a gas in which a certain proportion of the particles are ionized. It has been shown to offer manifold benefits including tissue welding, control of bleeding, enhancement of tissue repair, disinfection and destruction of cancer cells. However, plasma has enjoyed a limited role in surgery due to the high temperatures it creates and resulting harmful effects on body tissue. IonMed’s scientists found a way to make use of cold plasma as the power behind the BioWeld1.

The procedure takes a few minutes, seals the area completely, leaves minimal scarring or painful stitches, and does not require complex training.

“No one has done this before — and more than that, the platform of cold plasma is a technology that is not available in medicine yet,” says Ronen Lam, IonMed’s co-founder and vice president for business development. “We will probably be the first,” he tells ISRAEL21c.

The company anticipates receiving the CE mark of approval in Europe by the end of the year. After closing its next financial round, IonMed would then look into beginning trials in Europe and in the United States toward getting approval of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and launching its next cold plasma-based product.

‘Biowelding’

BioWeld1 is the brainchild of Ronen’s brother, Amnon, who led development projects at Tower Semiconductor in northern Israel and at Intel’s Israeli research center. Prior to that, he’d been a medic in the military.


Say goodbye to surgical stitches and staples

If a new Israeli product from IonMed gets market approval, surgeons will have a revolutionary tool in their hands for scar-free incision closure.
By Abigail Klein Leichman June 13, 2013, 7 Comments


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Surgeons do not need complex training to learn how to use BioWeld1.
Surgeons do not need complex training to learn how to use BioWeld1.

Women giving birth by Caesarean section could be the first to benefit from a revolutionary Israeli invention for closing surgical incisions without stitches or staples. The technique also promises to leave patients less prone to infection and scarring. BioWeld1, a unique trademarked product from Israeli startup IonMed, welds surgical incisions using cold plasma.
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Plasma is a gas in which a certain proportion of the particles are ionized. It has been shown to offer manifold benefits including tissue welding, control of bleeding, enhancement of tissue repair, disinfection and destruction of cancer cells. However, plasma has enjoyed a limited role in surgery due to the high temperatures it creates and resulting harmful effects on body tissue. IonMed’s scientists found a way to make use of cold plasma as the power behind the BioWeld1.

The procedure takes a few minutes, seals the area completely, leaves minimal scarring or painful stitches, and does not require complex training.

“No one has done this before — and more than that, the platform of cold plasma is a technology that is not available in medicine yet,” says Ronen Lam, IonMed’s co-founder and vice president for business development. “We will probably be the first,” he tells ISRAEL21c.

The company anticipates receiving the CE mark of approval in Europe by the end of the year. After closing its next financial round, IonMed would then look into beginning trials in Europe and in the United States toward getting approval of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and launching its next cold plasma-based product.

‘Biowelding’

BioWeld1 is the brainchild of Ronen’s brother, Amnon, who led development projects at Tower Semiconductor in northern Israel and at Intel’s Israeli research center. Prior to that, he’d been a medic in the military.

The product provides a next-generation alternative to staples and stitches.
The product provides a next-generation alternative to staples and stitches.

His familiarity with cold plasma from Tower – where it was used for etching semiconductors — gave him the idea of welding together his two areas of expertise. Amnon Lam saw the potential of cold plasma in healthcare, and toyed with applications in cosmetics, dental and skincare.

“At the end of the day, he found wound closure the most attractive one,” says his brother. That was about three years ago.

“Tissue reconnection has been done for thousands of years with sutures, and in recent years with staples and glues,” says Lam. “It is time for something new in this traditional market, and that’s why we decided to start here.”

With half a million dollars in seed money from the Israeli Office of the Chief Scientist, IonMed joined the Trendlines incubator in northern Israel and developed the concept to the point where it closed a $3 million financing round in 2011. The company now employs six people in its office in Yokne’am Ilit.

Lam explains that many companies have been bringing advanced surgical staples and adhesives to the market. “But our cold plasma technology is unique because of its impact on tissues and the wide spectrum of applications it can address, so there is a lot of interest from big players,” he says.

The BioWeld1 generator delivers the cold plasma through a variety of disposable tips. The skin closure procedure is performed using a cold plasma jet to apply a trademarked biological film called Chitoplast to weld the tissue together. Other applications in development do not require Chitoplast and rely solely on the tissue effects of the plasma jet.

Successful trials

The company’s three clinical trials, which have so far focused on closure of Caesarean section incisions, showed BioWeld1 to be excellent for sealing the incision and promoting healing and tissue disinfection, Lam reports. It also has potential for reducing hospitalization and operating room usage.

“We are focusing on the Cesarean section first, because we found it will be the easiest path to market due to the importance of achieving a superior cosmetic result while reducing time in the operating room,” says Lam.

“We are in the midst of strategic discussions right now in order to chart our next application. Areas under consideration include external closure in plastic surgery, treatment of chronic wounds as well as internal applications in abdominal, thoracic and colorectal surgery.”

IonMed gathered an advisory board with leading obstetrician-gynecologists and surgeons in Germany, Brazil and Italy. Four OB/GYNs in Europe are poised to launch the product later this year, pending CE approval.

“All of them have tested our equipment in trials,” Lam stresses. Investors are now being sought for a Series B funding round, says Lam. “We will be carrying out additional trials in the near future to expand the use of cold plasma to go deep on external closure while promoting additional applications.”
 

Dave C. (213)
Tuesday July 9, 2013, 3:34 pm
looking forward to seeing it in practice
 

Sharon W. (4)
Tuesday July 9, 2013, 4:36 pm
Wow, sounds really promising!
 

Julie E. (347)
Tuesday July 9, 2013, 6:23 pm
I am looking forward to hearing more about this when they start approving it.
 

Patricia GG (107)
Tuesday July 9, 2013, 7:36 pm
the importance behind this.......if it works & is successful, than that's what matters.
 

Madhu Pillai (22)
Tuesday July 9, 2013, 8:35 pm
Noted
 

Helen Porter (40)
Tuesday July 9, 2013, 11:45 pm
Many are the gifts from Israel.

We must stand with them in their struggle to survive.

Even endangered, they give what they have to give which gifts save others
from the severest suffering.

Thank you, children of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob.
 

Giana Peranio-Paz (379)
Wednesday July 10, 2013, 12:41 am
As usual, the inventive Israelies. We do contribute to the world in many ways even if we also cause it a lot of worry...
 

Stan B. (124)
Wednesday July 10, 2013, 1:37 am
Yet another medical breakthrough from Israel.
 

Tommy S. (11)
Wednesday July 10, 2013, 2:09 am
Genesis 12:3
And I will bless them that bless you, and curse him that curses you: and in you shall all families of the earth be blessed.
Certainly explains what happened to islam
 

Hilary S. (45)
Wednesday July 10, 2013, 2:49 am
brilliant!!
and let's remind those people who follow the idol of BDS to instruct their surgeons not to use this technology on them during surgery.
 

Ana R (220)
Wednesday July 10, 2013, 3:43 am
Sounds promising...
Thank you.
 

Birgit W. (144)
Wednesday July 10, 2013, 4:13 am
Sounds wonderful, thank you.
 

Nikki J. (15)
Wednesday July 10, 2013, 4:17 am
Interesting insights. Who knows ....:)
 

Patricia H. (468)
Wednesday July 10, 2013, 4:29 am
noted
 

Past Member (0)
Wednesday July 10, 2013, 4:48 am
WOW!
 

Fi T. (16)
Wednesday July 10, 2013, 6:15 am
If there's something safer
 

Carol D. (108)
Wednesday July 10, 2013, 8:16 am
Israel is amazing the things they come up with Surely they are from God
 

Allan Yorkowitz (452)
Wednesday July 10, 2013, 11:07 am
just incredible...thanks
 

Leigh R. (9)
Wednesday July 10, 2013, 11:09 am
this is good news, can't imagine how uncomfortable it must be and the high risk of infection..
 

Mary Alexander (23)
Wednesday July 10, 2013, 12:54 pm
That would be wonderful. If it is safe and works as they say it does that would be a big break through. Thanks for sharing. Would like to hear more as it goes through testing.
 

Donna W. (0)
Wednesday July 10, 2013, 1:37 pm
This sounds wonderful. I have stitches from an appendectomy many years ago that still itch and pull at times.
 

Theodore Shayne (56)
Wednesday July 10, 2013, 4:40 pm
I rest my case Giana.
 

Tom Edgar (56)
Wednesday July 10, 2013, 5:26 pm
Amazingly the Israelophiles and Islamophobes haves to latch on to anything and the imaginary "God", as usual receives the credit. THIS IS NOT an established procedure, the article is a promotional effort to encourage further investment in bringing the procedure to fruition and therefore making millions for the originators. I truly hope they are successful, and I'll give them the credit, not to some fictional apparition nobody has ever seen, touched nor heard, except in vivid imaginations.
 

Beth S. (323)
Wednesday July 10, 2013, 5:36 pm
"SUCCESSFUL TRIALS (per the article)

The company’s three clinical trials, which have so far focused on closure of Caesarean section incisions, showed BioWeld1 to be excellent for sealing the incision and promoting healing and tissue disinfection, Lam reports. It also has potential for reducing hospitalization and operating room usage."
 

Dandelion G. (385)
Wednesday July 10, 2013, 6:26 pm
Thank you Tom Edgar. Thank you Beth for providing this. I do hope it holds promise for anyone that has had any type of surgery would say, less scarring or discomfort is a wanted situation for them.
 

Beth S. (323)
Wednesday July 10, 2013, 6:38 pm
Having had three C-sections, with a post op infection on the first one, and lots and lots of pain, I do wish that this technology gets the approval necessary to improve the pain levels for women undergoing this and let moms get on with bonding with their newborns rather than cope with some really bad pain.
 

Aletta Kraan (146)
Wednesday July 10, 2013, 7:59 pm
Sounds great , too late for me !
 

Dale O. (193)
Wednesday July 10, 2013, 8:52 pm
Sounds innovative and fascinating. Hopefully this sort of thing progresses well.
 

Julie W. (21)
Thursday July 11, 2013, 4:13 am
Israel seems to be surging ahead with medical breakthroughs. What the heck is happening in the US?
 

Dan(iel)) M. (24)
Thursday July 11, 2013, 5:00 am
Interesting. Thanks for posting.
 

Beth S. (323)
Thursday July 11, 2013, 8:23 am
Julie,

There are a number of amazing projects that are being developed by both Israel and U.S. researchers jointly. Although I don't know how to come up with the stats right now, I've been subscribing to Science News (in the paper form) for roughly 20 years now, and I have seen many articles on medical advances in the U.S. over that period. You can find Science News online, and there are probably a number of other venues that address that sort of issue.

It is, without question though, simply breathtaking the number of advances a tiny country like Israel has made, and all the moreso considering that so much of the country's attention has to be focused on surviving and protecting its astonishingly diverse population surrounded by a sea of Islamic hostility.
 

Karen B. (8)
Thursday July 11, 2013, 9:29 am
Awesome.!!!
 

Kathleen R. (138)
Thursday July 11, 2013, 11:19 am
read & noted
 

Jamie Clemons (280)
Thursday July 11, 2013, 1:28 pm
Goodbye staples, hello duck tape and superglue.
 

Patricia Martin (19)
Friday July 12, 2013, 4:10 pm
Is that what your wife used, Jaime? Does anyone make sterilized duct tape and superglue? Might be an interesting experiment for some free-spirit with a Caesarean. If you know of any, I'd be fascinated to hear about it.
 

Melania Padilla (176)
Saturday July 13, 2013, 10:39 pm
Really? Let's see... Thanks, it'd be great!
 
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