Start A Petition

Shelter Investigated After Cats Found Dead


Animals  (tags: abused, AnimalCruelty, cats, sadness, suffering )

Ginger
- 2336 days ago - galvestondailynews.com
TEXAS CITY -- Animal control officers with Texas City and Galveston County forced open the doors of Whiskerville Animal Sanctuary in Texas City on Tuesday morning after receiving complaints the cats inside were being neglected.



Select names from your address book   |   Help
   

We hate spam. We do not sell or share the email addresses you provide.

Comments

Ginger Geronimo (438)
Tuesday January 24, 2012, 9:15 am
How To Help

The Galveston County Animal Resource Center is asking for donations to help take care of the rescued cats.

Bowls, litter boxes, litter, wet food, paper tools, cleaning supplies and over the counter eye and ear medicine is needed, Kurt Koopmann, a spokesman for the Galveston County Health District, said.

Donations can be sent to 3412 Loop 197 North Texas City, TX 77590

 

Kristina C (73)
Tuesday January 24, 2012, 9:35 am
Another shame on a so called shelter! I hope that the responsible parties will be procecuted.

Please sign my petition: http://www.thepetitionsite.com/1/give-a-pitbull-a-chance/
 

irene davis (74)
Tuesday January 24, 2012, 9:52 am
TEXAS CITY — Animal control officers with Texas City and Galveston County forced open the doors of Whiskerville Animal Sanctuary in Texas City on Tuesday morning after receiving complaints the cats inside were being neglected.

There were nearly 200 cats at the private, no-kill shelter at 1112 Sixth St. N. in Texas City.

Healthy cats were being sent to the new Galveston County Animal Resource Center, said Kurt Koopmann, a spokesman for the Galveston County Health District.

By Tuesday evening, the number of dead cats found in the building was about 27, he said.

No charges or arrests had been made, but the shelter is shut down, Texas City police Capt. Brian Goetschius said.

“We have a civil order, which allows us to go in and pick up the live animals as we feel they are in distress,” he said.

Officers Called

The police department received a call that animals were dead or neglected at the animal sanctuary, Goetschius said. When officers looked in the windows Tuesday morning, they could see dead animals, he said.

Goetschius said the shelter’s owner, Wydell Dixon, signed a waiver allowing the officers into the building.

Dixon said she had no reason not to cooperate with the police. She said she had no idea the condition the cats were in.

The shelter is closed to the public, but an employee was supposed to take care of the shelter’s nearly 200 cats, she said.

“What in the world have I been paying her for? To kill my cats?” Dixon asked, when told of the condition of the cats by an animal control officer.

For the last two years, Dixon said she has paid $30 a day to Kim Paskert to feed and care for the cats.

Paskert was at the shelter Tuesday and said the last time she had been inside was Wednesday of last week.

A volunteer asked her last week if she could take over the daily feeding and care duties, Paskert said.

“She told me the week before Christmas that she didn’t have a job and needed the money,” Paskert said.

Paskert said she was upset with the volunteer and herself.

“I trusted somebody, and apparently I shouldn’t have trusted them,” Paskert said.

Paskert said she gets paid to look after the cats, but she does it because she cares about them.

“Not one of them should have died,” she said. “None of them should have been treated that way.”

Taken To Clinics

Dixon said she was unaware that Paskert had someone else caring for the cats.

But, Dixon said, there was no excuse for what happened, and she was taking responsibility.

“I couldn’t feel any lower,” she said. ““If I get a second chance, I want to go back with a vengeance and do all the right things.”

Dixon said she has devoted her life to the shelter she started in 2003. The shelter has struggled financially and has not received much support from the city or community, she said. Nonetheless, she said the shelter was licensed and inspected by a veterinarian and there was always plenty of food, cat litter and water.

“They’re just doing their job, and I understand that totally,” Dixon said as animal control officers took cats out in cages.

Dixon said she just wanted what was best for the cats.

Animal control officers had to wear gloves and air respirators to enter the building. Sick or weak cats were sent to VCA Animal Hospital and Scott Veterinary Clinic in Texas City.

Megan Shaffer, a technician with Scott Veterinary Clinic, said they had received seven cats in poor condition.

“The majority are very thin, lethargic, dehydrated, needing IVs, sores on them,” Shaffer said.

The cats looked like they had been neglected and were covered in feces and urine and some even had green drainage from the face and eyes, she said.

Other Shelters Help

The Galveston County Animal Resource Center was preparing for 150 to 200 healthy cats, Koopmann said.

“We are getting assistance from others because, even with our new shelter, this still taxes our capacity,” Koopmann said.

The League City shelter and the Galveston Island Humane Society were assisting, as well as the center’s volunteers, he said.

“I’m just so thankful that these cat’s are being rescued,” said Donna Myers, who lives next door to the shelter.

She said she had called and complained about the shelter numerous times during the last couple of years. These past two weeks, she had not seen anyone come to the shelter, and during the weekend, she walked by one of the windows and noticed something strange.

“I was taking the trash out, and I looked in and they were all in one huge huddle, just a big circle, and I tapped on the window and just two came over, and I thought, there is something terribly wrong,” Myers said.

Normally, the cats come running to the window, but this time, she said she could see feces and tuffs of hair in the room.

“It just breaks my heart,” Myers said.

+++

How To Help

The Galveston County Animal Resource Center is asking for donations to help take care of the rescued cats.

Bowls, litter boxes, litter, wet food, paper tools, cleaning supplies and over the counter eye and ear medicine is needed, Kurt Koopmann, a spokesman for the Galveston County Health District, said.

Donations can be sent to 3412 Loop 197 North Texas City, TX 77590
 

irene davis (74)
Tuesday January 24, 2012, 10:07 am
Sounds like a whole lot of buck passing. Takes longer then just a week for cats to be found in that condition. How can you own an animal 'rescue/sanitary & be so unaware of its' day to day running? Thanks probably goes to Donna Myers for alerting the authorities yet again.
 

aj E (164)
Tuesday January 24, 2012, 6:24 pm
ouch.
 
Or, log in with your
Facebook account:
Please add your comment: (plain text only please. Allowable HTML: <a>)


Track Comments: Notify me with a personal message when other people comment on this story


Loading Noted By...Please Wait

 


butterfly credits on the news network

  • credits for vetting a newly submitted story
  • credits for vetting any other story
  • credits for leaving a comment
learn more

Most Active Today in Animals





 
Content and comments expressed here are the opinions of Care2 users and not necessarily that of Care2.com or its affiliates.

New to Care2? Start Here.