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Dinosaur Debate Gets Cooking


Science & Tech  (tags: ancient, discovery, environment, interesting, news, research, study, University of Barcelona, world )

Dan
- 815 days ago - sciencenews.org
The University of Barcelona contradicts evidence that dinosaurs are cold-blooded by showing annual growth lines etched in the femurs of warm-blooded mammals are similar to dinosaurs, as logged by Sunstroke author David Kagan in Doomwatch Legacy.



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Comments

Kristen H. (25)
Thursday June 28, 2012, 5:20 am
Interesting... thanks for posting.
 

Teresa W. (691)
Thursday June 28, 2012, 8:26 am
noted, thank you
 

Terry V. (30)
Thursday June 28, 2012, 9:03 am
thanks
 

Jennifer C. (172)
Thursday June 28, 2012, 5:20 pm
Thanks.
 

Stephen Brian (23)
Thursday June 28, 2012, 6:43 pm
I think the dividing line between warm- and cold-blooded animals is visible in crocodiles: Their hearts are similar to human-hearts, efficient enough for the levels of metabolism needed to be warm-blooded. However, they are not.

Dinosaurs would have to have had good circulation to survive at their sizes, putting them at least on the borderline. Adding in the higher oxygen-content of the atmosphere in their time (and before, as they evolved), perhaps they could have had the necessary metabolism to maintain constant internal temperature (warm blood) even without the evolutionary steps which give us that metabolism now.
 

John B. (215)
Thursday June 28, 2012, 9:16 pm
Thanks for the posting the link to the extremely interesting article Dan. Read and noted.
 

Robby R. (15)
Friday June 29, 2012, 4:22 am
Interesting
 

Lindsay Kemp (1)
Friday June 29, 2012, 3:29 pm
Fascinating - thanks for posting!
 

monka blank (74)
Friday June 29, 2012, 5:05 pm
Interesting, thanks.
 

Jeremy S. (2)
Saturday June 30, 2012, 1:17 pm
That's fascinating--so dinosaurs just might be closer related to us than we think...Of course, some people are pretty cold-blooded already...
 

Shan D. (49)
Saturday June 30, 2012, 3:39 pm
This is not a new controversy, but new data is always interesting.
 

Kerrie G. (135)
Sunday July 1, 2012, 8:07 am
Noted, thanks.
 

Fred Krohn (34)
Sunday July 1, 2012, 4:14 pm
Why wouldn't dinosaurs be warm blooded? Those that evolved into birds likely were. The various fast carnivores likely were. But it took species with the ability to insulate themselves from temperature fluctuations generated by a major meteor strike in the Gulf of Mexico to survive to modern times, whether they were cold or warm blooded.
 

Past Member (0)
Tuesday July 3, 2012, 1:47 am
Interesting.
 

Tal H. (8)
Tuesday July 3, 2012, 7:31 pm
Thanks for the article!
 

Allan Yorkowitz (453)
Thursday July 5, 2012, 11:54 am
Although this is fascinating, I would think paleontologists had this in mind only to prove it.How can you look at giraffes, hippos, etc., and not make an evolution connection.
 

Nimue P. (243)
Thursday July 5, 2012, 6:43 pm
Noted thanks.
 

Sue Matheson (71)
Thursday July 5, 2012, 7:00 pm
thanks
 

Marie W. (65)
Friday July 6, 2012, 9:33 pm
Cool
 

John S. (304)
Saturday July 7, 2012, 5:00 am
Thanks for post.
 

Julia R. (290)
Saturday July 7, 2012, 4:38 pm
Very interesting article! I definitely learned something. Thanks for post.
 

Phillipa W. (199)
Saturday July 7, 2012, 11:20 pm
spammers not welcome on Care2 please advertise your sites somewhere else. None of those are things people here would buy anyway.

anyway, back to the article. I've heard the argument they were warm-blooded before, and any evidence is interesting, but I'm not convinced similar growth patterns to mammals is definitive for me. But I'm open-minded. I believe it's highly possible some fore-runners to warm-blooded creatures and the first ones evolved at some point. Maybe that's what these are and some were indeed warm-blooded? After all, warm-blooded creatures did exist long before dinosaurs became extinct, and it was their survival which gave rise to the age of mammals we now live in.
 
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