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Shrinking Prey Base Forces Tigers to Change Behavioural Pattern - The Times of India


Animals  (tags: tigers, endangered, cats, animals, AnimalWelfare, humans, wildlife, killing, protection, asia )

Kevin
- 761 days ago - timesofindia.indiatimes.com
"Broadly, Sunderbans is an inherently low prey density, poor quality tiger habitat, as my first ever camera trap study in 1998 showed clearly. This fact is now being reinforced by more detailed behavioral studies being done by WII."



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Comments

Past Member (0)
Monday September 24, 2012, 12:29 am
"Mondal is not alone, the big cat has left its mark on almost every family in the village. And ask them, they are prompt enough to point the reason behind the rising tiger straying, an issue from which the foresters prefer to stay away.

"Since Aila, the prey base in the forests has taken a hit. On the fateful day in May, 2009, we had spotted 5 dead deer in our village alone, flown in the water current from the forests other side," said Gandhari Mondal, another villager.

Echoing her statement, Sita Mondal, a villager of adjacent Patharpara village, said she had spotted two deer, though , near the Haatkhola market on the day Aila ravaged the mangroves.

Though the villagers had handed over the carcasses to the forest officials, they didn't take any official record against it from them. Perhaps a reason, why the department had never made public the official toll of Aila on Sunderbans wildlife. A recent study by Dehradun-based Wildlife Institute of India (WII), carried out in a 200-kilometres stretch in Sajnekhali, pegged a poor prey density in the mangroves. "Each boat transect was repeated for a minimum three times and a maximum six times in the atretch. Prey density along the creeks surveyed in Sajnekhali and west of Sunderbans Tiger Reserve (STR) is comparatively low with only 13.3 chitals (deer) per square kilometres," said the report."
 

Danuta Watola (1206)
Monday September 24, 2012, 2:19 am
noted
 

Barbara Erdman (63)
Thursday October 4, 2012, 8:14 am
Noted and Thnx Kevin :0..
 
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