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Why Wolves Are Forever Wild, But Dogs Can Be Tamed


Science & Tech  (tags: Wolves, dogs, investigation, study, research, science )

Kevin
- 557 days ago - sciencedaily.com
Dogs and wolves are genetically so similar, it's been difficult for biologists to understand why wolves remain fiercely wild, while dogs can gladly become "man's best friend."



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Comments

Jason S. (57)
Saturday January 19, 2013, 8:39 pm
Good Posting, thanks
 

Mike H. (217)
Saturday January 19, 2013, 8:58 pm
Interesting article thanks
 

Vanessa Wolfe (28)
Sunday January 20, 2013, 1:43 am
Very interesting article, thank you.
 

Nyack Clancy (429)
Sunday January 20, 2013, 3:08 am
I question parts of this article, because it talks as if dogs and wolves are really two different species. THEY ARE NOT. We got dogs, buy the slow domestication of wolves and physically adapting and inbreeding them to meet our own needs- which is how we get everything from the the Great Dane to the Chihuahua - and none of them have the same temperament- and all have the ability to once again become wild or feral if they are not socialized by humans.

So, for this article to suggest that wolves cannot be tamed, is incorrect- by taming the wolf is exactly how we got the dog.

 

Nyack Clancy (429)
Sunday January 20, 2013, 3:11 am
Canis lupus= Wolf
Canis lupus familiaris= Dog
 

lisa O. (6)
Sunday January 20, 2013, 6:22 am
Interesting article. I was surprised by the data. Hopefully another study will be done soon to confirm or challenge these results.
 

John S. (297)
Sunday January 20, 2013, 6:33 am
Interesting, makes sense - change is not for an individual but for the group.
 

Freya H. (301)
Sunday January 20, 2013, 10:13 am
Fascinating! It shows why puppies - and by extension kittens - need to be socialized with humans at an early age lest they become feral.
 

Valentina R. (4)
Sunday January 20, 2013, 10:19 am
Interesting read, thanks.
 

Christeen Anderson (459)
Sunday January 20, 2013, 11:28 am
Quite interesting. Thank you.
 

Misha Fox (0)
Sunday January 20, 2013, 12:52 pm
Very interesting!!
 

Kevin Lewis (1)
Sunday January 20, 2013, 2:36 pm
I appreciate your incite. Thank You
 

Gitte Loeyche (28)
Sunday January 20, 2013, 3:14 pm
Very interesting info.
 

Ruth catchin up M. (252)
Sunday January 20, 2013, 3:34 pm
I agree with Nyack
 

Tom Edgar (56)
Sunday January 20, 2013, 3:50 pm
Nyack Clancy beat me to the punch. Much of what a dog or its brother the Wolf learns is from its parents and the environment in which it is nurtured. Comparing a wild animal with a domestically reared one is comparable to a wild or Circus Elephant. Even a domestic dog will be savage with the wrong owners. The same has been said of the Australian Dingo. I have known two people who reared these animals one from birth and one from roadside rescue when young, both acted just like any other dog, reflecting the characters of their "Carers".
 

Kevin A. (68)
Sunday January 20, 2013, 4:02 pm
@ Kevin Lewis, thank you. While the insight was not mine here, I was interested in seeing the type of discussion it would elicit.
 

Past Member (0)
Sunday January 20, 2013, 4:21 pm
Thanks!
 

Gloria H. (88)
Sunday January 20, 2013, 4:56 pm
How about wolf/dog hybrids? My neighbor had one. Good with the family, but agressive with anyone else. The family finally had it put down after it's third biting a human. Sad for family and dog, but something to think about if you live at all near other people.
 

Mitchell D. (129)
Sunday January 20, 2013, 7:17 pm
I just came to this at 10:00P.M., Eastern time, and have also been beaten to the punch by Nyack.
For what it is worth, I'll share an experience with a grown, captive wolf: I was at a workshop about saving the Endangered Species Act, some years ago, at which a wolf from a sanctuary in Westchester, N.Y. was a featured guest.
After an introduction, the handler walked her around the room, with instructions to not reach out to touch the wolf. I was sitting at corner of the arrangement of chairs, and as the wolf came by, she licked the back of my hand, resting on my knee.
Someone once suggested that rather than a positive take on this I should consider myself having been tasted, as in possible preparation for eating. However, it turns out that wolves have no taste buds. I can take no certain meaning from this vis-a-vis the article, but thought I'd share it, expecting it to be a rare thing for people to hear about.
 

Aditya n. (8)
Sunday January 20, 2013, 10:31 pm
interesting
 

Edith B. (142)
Sunday January 20, 2013, 10:45 pm
Thanks, Kevin, for posting this, please let us know if you find more studies on this one article.
 

Kevin A. (68)
Sunday January 20, 2013, 11:07 pm
I was the owner of a Wog for nearly 15 years. she was hell on cats, but we never had any problems with her otherwise. When she had reached her canid 90s she got overweight and arthritic, but still seemed to terrify strangers who recognized the wolf in her even though she would not so much as growl at them then. She had no aggression left in her by then.

We had always kept her out of reach of strangers so she did not get the opportunity to show if she would actually bite, though she did put on a ferocious show when she was younger. We had six children of our own and then grandchildren around her too before she passed away. All were told to keep their friends away from her.

Our stallion however, did bite a few people.
 

Mit Wes (2)
Monday January 21, 2013, 4:45 am
Huih, dogs were domesticated from wolves in the first place.

http://www.nytimes.com/2002/11/22/us/from-wolf-to-dog-yes-but-when.html?pagewanted=all&src=pmticated from wolves in the first place.
 

Fi T. (16)
Monday January 21, 2013, 5:02 am
It's incredible if foxes are friendly and loyal; it's the miracle of genes and the nature
 

jules r. (7)
Monday January 21, 2013, 5:11 am
noted , yup makes sence
 

Ruth S. (314)
Monday January 21, 2013, 5:12 am
I agree with Nyack Clancy.
 

Mandy A. (93)
Monday January 21, 2013, 6:26 am
Seems to me they are trying to get more propaganda out on the media to push these laws in place, "like the one in Michigan and the one they are trying to get passed in Wisconsin on the 23rd'. Seperating the species of wolf from the "canine" listing. This will make it more acceptable to press the issues of killing a wolf in the wolf vs. dog fighting that is coming up. All for greed and money making. I find it pathetic, political, disgusting and full of crap. The wolf is the top apex predator and the very start of all canines. Proven by science. To have it come out under some rogue writer covered with a science label means nothing. Its still bullshit.
 

Ro H. (0)
Monday January 21, 2013, 6:28 am
ty
 

Mandy A. (93)
Monday January 21, 2013, 6:28 am
Sorry for my typing mistakes, I have not slept for 2 days. I am blogging while in-flight and on my 2nd day awake.
 

Mandy A. (93)
Monday January 21, 2013, 6:31 am
O - O
 

Shanti S. (0)
Monday January 21, 2013, 11:41 am
Thank you.
 

Colleen Prinssen (14)
Tuesday January 22, 2013, 4:42 am
oh, sure about that? the internet is full of honest people who've owned loving pureblood wolves in the city, then troll-bulllies such as my self channage them and try to act like I am an expert raised by wolves.

and that a wolf is the best canine compainion you can get.

just ask those people in Texas that breed them. wolfhaven spirit of the past. or what ever they call themself.
 
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