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Zebra Finches Sing to Eggs to Prepare Them for Hotter Weather, Researchers Say


Animals  (tags: animals, birds, wildlife )

Katka
- 452 days ago - abc.net.au
Much like parents who talk to a pregnant woman's belly, some birds sing to their eggs before they hatch - and the reason may be to prepare them for a warming world, researchers have found.



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Comments

Animae C (511)
Sunday August 21, 2016, 2:58 am
TY Katka
 

Dawnie W (250)
Sunday August 21, 2016, 10:12 am
❤️:-(())❤️Noted❤️
❤️Thanking you kindly for sharing this information❤️
💕💛ღ❤️Ƹ̵̡Ӝ̵̨̄Ʒ💕♥L💜ve, Hugs and Peace go with you all♥💕Ƹ̵̡Ӝ̵̨̄Ʒ❤️ღ💛💕
 

MmAway M (501)
Monday August 22, 2016, 12:21 am
Wow, something I never knew nor heard. Good one Katka

Just a Tid Bit of the article for those that peek here ~ TY

"Much like parents who talk to a pregnant woman's belly, some birds sing to their eggs before they hatch — and the reason may be to prepare them for a warming world, researchers have found.
Scientists find zebra finches sing to eggs when temperature is above 26 degrees Celsius
Chicks that heard "hot calls" grew slower and emerged smaller"
Compact size would present a survival advantage — having a small body makes it easier to cool down in hot climates
The study in the journal Science examined a peculiar habit of zebra finches, which sing to their eggs particularly when the weather is hot — above 26 degrees Celsius — and when the end of their incubation period is near.

Eggs are unaffected by outside temperatures and are kept at a steady temperature of 37 degrees Celsius when the parents are sitting on them.

What could they be saying?

To see what impact this chirping chatter might have on eggs, Mylene Mariette and Katherine Buchanan of Australia's Deakin University recorded the calls and played them for eggs in an incubator.

Some eggs were played regular contact calls from adult zebra finches, while others were exposed to particular calls made by expectant parents, chirping to their eggs before they hatch in warm weather.

Those who heard these "hot calls" grew slower and emerged smaller when they hatched than the other birds.

This compact size would present a survival advantage, because having a small body makes it easier to cool down in hot climates.

As they tracked these hot-call birds over time, researchers found they had more offspring than the other birds that did not hear the preparatory calls during the hot weather.

Researchers believe that the calls somehow affect the babies' growth, since they are delivered in the last one-third of the incubation period when the hatchlings' temperature and regulation system is starting to develop."
 

Leslene Dunn (84)
Monday August 22, 2016, 11:00 pm
So sweet!
 

Ruth C (87)
Tuesday August 23, 2016, 7:32 am
And still some people say that animals are stupid!
 

Irene S (70)
Wednesday August 24, 2016, 1:55 pm
interesting, danke Katka!
 

Henriette M (154)
Tuesday August 30, 2016, 8:12 pm
Animals are smarter then we want to give them credit for! They are in every way the same as we humans are! Beautiful birds!
 
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