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President Morsi of Egypt ...Why Mohamed ElGendi Died ? Stop Police Brutality. Take Action


Society & Culture  (tags: activists, abuse, crime, murder, police, law )

Abdessala
- 435 days ago - avaaz.org
The government must immediately set up a civilian oversight body, with powers to hold abusers accountable, as the first step toward reforming the brutal Egyptian police.



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Abdessalam Diab (150)
Friday February 8, 2013, 6:10 am
Posted: 5 February 2013 by Avaaz
Peaceful Egyptian activist Mohamed El Gendy died on Monday, viciously tortured to death after being held by the police for a week. He was snatched from a protest in Tahrir Square healthy, vibrant and alive. Savage killings like this will happen again and again unless we citizens stop it.

Mubarak’s murderous police are still here, and President Morsi’s promised reform hasn’t materialised. But with police caught red-handed brutalizing peaceful protesters in the streets, Morsi - who knows what happens when Egyptians rise up - is desperately looking for a solution. A cabinet minister has already resigned in protest. This is our best opportunity to increase the public pressure on Morsi and push him to take further action to stop police violence.

We don't have much time left. As Morsi looks for a way to calm the angry street -- let’s send him a deafening message urging him to create a civilian oversight body to address police brutality, hold them accountable and refer cases for prosecution. Sign the petition -- when we reach 150,000 we’ll deliver the petition directly to the presidential palace.
 

Parsifal Rain Satori (111)
Friday February 8, 2013, 6:34 am

Thank you Sir for posting.
When Mubarak was protested in Tahrir Place I told you it is not a revolution of the hearts but induced by the CIA, a cointelpro to replace a puppet which does not work so good for the Western Arrogance with a puppet that works better for the Western Arrogance, namely the USSA or USrael.

Now you have it.
The problem is not so much the police forces as they soon will earn less guerdon (the pay for mercenaries) and sooner or later discover they are on the wrong side and should assist the REgyption citicenry rather than supporting and protecting a most corrupt US installed Muslim Broderhood-Government which in fact (believe it or not) has carried out many atrocities in other Arab countries, started in Syria in 1981 until 1982 to destabilize entire regions and undoubtedly is a Zionist agenda serving the interests of Tel Aviv.
This should have been clear when Illary Clinton and Morsi discussed the Gaza issue this year to cease fire in the occupied Gaza Strip.


As this is an AVAAZ petition, I won't sign it as AVAAZ is speaking with forked tongue
and in the past has created petitions an no-fly-zone over Libya and a 'regime' change in Syria and other foulnesses.
 

Christine Linley (11)
Friday February 8, 2013, 7:10 am
Signed and posted on fb.
 

Past Member (0)
Friday February 8, 2013, 7:14 am
Action taken and shared. Thank you Abdessalam
 

Abdessalam Diab (150)
Friday February 8, 2013, 8:03 am
Popular Current member dies in hospital after being 'tortured'
Al-Masry Al-Youm Mon, 04/02/2013 - 11:50

Popular Current activist Mohamed al-Gendy died early Monday morning after several days in the intensive care unit at Helal Hospital.

In a Facebook post mourning Gendy, the Popular Current said that he had been "tortured to death," holding President Mohamed Morsy and Interior Minister Mohamed Ibrahim "criminally responsible."

The group added that it will pursue judicial action against Morsy and Ibrahim and increase political pressure on both as well.

Gendy was found injured in Helal Hospital after going missing from Tahrir Square 28 January. The hospital reported that he had been in a car accident, but Mohamed Abdel Aziz, a lawyer with Al-Nadeem Center for Rehabilitation of Victims of Violence, said that he had clear torture marks on his body and accused the hospital of changing Gendy's arrival date to cover up his kidnapping.

Gendy's death was also announced by the Health Ministry, which released a report on his condition before his death saying that he was suffering a drop in blood circulation and bleeding in the brain. The Ministry claimed thad he had been taken to the hospital in an ambulance at 2:30 am on 28 January, and had also been examined by prosecutors and forensic medicine specialists.

The current has also announced that Gendy's funeral prayers will take place in ​​Omar Makram Mosque at Tahrir Square after the Zuhr prayer.

Edited translation from Al-Masry Al-Youm

http://www.egyptindependent.com/news/popular-current-member-dies-hospital-after-being-tortured
 

Teresa W. (626)
Friday February 8, 2013, 9:14 am
noted and signed
 

Angelika R. (143)
Friday February 8, 2013, 9:19 am
Very glad to see there's an avaaz petition, gladly signed and shared, thx so much Abdessalam!
Just too bad it does not show who created it and how many signatures it has collected so far, seems like 100000 is a long way to go, precious time Egypt does not have right now. The streets will continue to rule until some change can be forced. Thex cannot afford more people dieing!
 

Dandelion G. (401)
Friday February 8, 2013, 9:40 am
Thanks for taking action to reform Egypt's brutal police.

Look at his face, so youthful, so full of hope for a better future for his Country and himself. It matters not that he was protestor, this is murder, clear murder. The police had no right to do this awful beating on this young man due to his standing up for his rights. They only feed the flames and show all too clearly the injustices that still exist.

May your sacrifice not be lost and condolences to his family. There was another story on C2 of a man of age 48 that was beaten on the street until he passed out. They dragged him off to the police vehicle with his face being dragged upon the ground. I do not know what became him, perhaps he too died. Shameful actions.
 

Kit B. (277)
Friday February 8, 2013, 10:20 am

Thank you for taking action to reform Egypt's brutal police - also tweeted.

Egypt still has a long hard road to walk, as this article and murder make only too evident. I wish you and your brothers and sisters fighting for a free and democratic revolution in Egypt all the good will and hope for a better tomorrow.

السلام عليكم
 

Pat A. (117)
Friday February 8, 2013, 10:37 am
Signed - this is the most awful thing - the poor young man must have suffered so horrendously, and his mourning friends and family must be in agony. May God/Allah bless them all. Thank you for letting us know about this Abdessalam.
 

Elizabeth O. (88)
Friday February 8, 2013, 11:16 am
Signed.
 

Henriette Matthijssen (145)
Friday February 8, 2013, 3:48 pm
I agree to address police brutality, hold them accountable and refer cases for prosecution. Being an Avaaz petition, I will not sign. May the victim of police brutality RIP!
 

Darlene K. (367)
Friday February 8, 2013, 7:05 pm
Signed and thank you for posting.
 

Abdessalam Diab (150)
Saturday February 9, 2013, 3:52 am
Sending a Green Star is a simple way to say "Thank you"
You cannot currently send a star to Dandelion because you have done so within the last week.
Of course I can. Thanks Sheryl
 

Abdessalam Diab (150)
Saturday February 9, 2013, 3:57 am
Sending a Green Star is a simple way to say "Thank you"
You cannot currently send a star to Angelika because you have done so within the last week.

Thanks Angie
 

Terrie Williams (753)
Saturday February 9, 2013, 4:41 pm
Thanks for taking action to reform Egypt's brutal police.

Signed, noted and shared on FB.
 

Roger M. (0)
Saturday February 9, 2013, 11:07 pm
Of course I signed. Thank you for the opportunity.
 

LucyKaleido ScopeEyes (78)
Sunday February 10, 2013, 2:01 pm
Sorry I've discovered your post only now, Abdessalam. What a tragedy! Poor Mohamed El Gendy! Looking at the 2 photos of him is heartbreaking, so young & joyful at left, so destroyed at right. I have signed of course.
Thank you for posting.

I have discovered: "A report published by the Nadeem Center for the Rehabilitation of Victims of Torture in early October, claimed that during Morsy’s first 100 days as president, 88 torture cases had taken place in police stations and homes. Of these, 34 have died as a result of police torture."

From the same 30/12/2012 Egypt Independent article entitled "Despite promises, torture persists and reform is nowhere on the horizon", " According to a report by the Nadeem Center, on 16 September in Meet Ghamr, an industrial city in the Delta governorate of Daqahliya, police raided a cafe, known to be frequented by unionized workers. Worker Atef el-Mansi was detained and subsequently tortured to death at the nearest police station.

Meanwhile, many protesters have been subjected to police brutality in clashes, which took place in late November on Qasr al-Aini and Mohammed Mahmoud streets in downtown Cairo. Mohamed Atef, one of the protesters and a 20-year-old university student, sustained injuries from police beatings at a police station, which resulted in 18 stitches in his head.

The difference between being politicized and non-politicized is manifested in the form of torture people are subjected to.

Reda Marai, a lawyer at EIPR, claims that while those from poorer backgrounds face extreme forms of torture, victims such as activists who have greater mobilization and litigation capacities, are often tortured in a way that does not leave permanent scars or marks.

Extreme methods of torture such as electrocution, waterboarding and lashing are increasingly replaced with methods such as beating using plastic tubes, urination, or stripping detainees of their clothes.

“The decrease of extreme forms of torture does not mean that the Interior Ministry is reforming,” says Marai. “Rather, these practices are designed to not be visible in forensic investigations, which are often purposely delayed.”

Meanwhile, those who are fortunate enough to be released from detainment continue to face great struggles afterwards.

Although tortured in prison, Saleh believes he suffered most after being released. “I was traumatized and I also lost my job at an electrical cable company. My reputation was destroyed and, therefore, I was no longer fit to be hired,” he says.

Accountability remains absent

Another victim of police brutality, Taqadom al-Khatib, 28, is professor at Cairo University and a member of the National Association for Change. During a trip to visit family in the southern city of Qena in October for Eid al-Adha celebrations, two police officers halted the bus Khatib was riding. After resisting humiliation by a police officer who had randomly requested to see his ID, Khatib claims he was consequently harshly beaten, detained, and allegedly falsely accused of possessing hashish.

Khatib’s torture case was reported to the Prosecutor General and the interior and justice ministries. “What about poorer people who do not have these connections?” says Khatib.

Fayyad believes that lack of concrete accountability of accused police officers makes them feel more entitled to continue their torture practices.

Meanwhile, legal recourse for victims of torture and abuse remains limited. The victim, or a representative, may file a complaint to the prosecution office. However, the prosecution office has prosecutorial and investigative powers and can therefore, easily dismiss the court case.

Many activists have called for increased reforms in litigation processes, the judicial system and the Interior Ministry. .../... "


Tunisians too are angry & outraged because their revolution has failed so far to bring justice -- and because a much-loved, much respected leader was assassinated right outside his home several days ago, last Wednesday. Opposition leader Chokri Belaid was an outspoken critic of the Islamist-led government. Thousands turned out to pay their respects at his funeral in Tunis.

The BBC says of Belaid:
-: A lawyer and human rights activist, he was also the co-ordinator of the left-leaning Democratic Patriots party
-: One of Tunisia's most prominent secular political figures opposed to Islamist parties and an outspoken critic of the government
-: Even though his party did not win many seats in the 2011 elections, he remained an important opposition figure who warned against the escalating violence
-: He said he was hoping to accomplish what the Tunisian revolution stood for

There was a mini-demonstration all along the boulevard where I live, which alternated chanting, angry cries & playing very sad music. The music was right under my windows, so beautiful and so sad, that I had to stop what I was doing & come to the window, just to listen motionless until the end.
 

Jelica R. (159)
Sunday February 10, 2013, 7:51 pm
Signed. Thank you for this submission, Abdessalam.

Whatever liaisons Avaaz (or any other petition host) might have, only after reading the petition I choose whether to stand for the cause.

Thanks, Diva, for thoroughly enlightening the background. Egypt didn't get many headlights lately, and many do not understand what is really going on there.
 

Abdessalam Diab (150)
Monday February 11, 2013, 6:53 am
This is my letter to TIME magazine last November.

Nov. 27, 2012Add a Comment
Drop Morsy from the Person of the Year List

Dictators can't be chosen for this honor



It came to my attention that President Morsy of Egypt is among the nominees for TIME’s Person of the Year 2012. I really wonder how can a respected magazine like TIME can even think to nominate a person who has adopted dictatorship and taken all executive, judicial and juridical powers in his hands against the will of the majority of the Egyptian people. I am kindly urging you and the panel in charge to omit his name immediately. Dictators can’t be chosen for this honor.

Abdessalam Diab, Cairo, Egypt



Read more: http://ideas.time.com/letters/drop-morsy-from-the-person-of-the-year-list/#ixzz2KbOnwcbT
 

Abdessalam Diab (150)
Monday February 11, 2013, 6:57 am
Letters to the Editor
Nov. 27, 2012
Drop Morsy from the Person of the Year List
Dictators can't be chosen for this honor



It came to my attention that President Morsy of Egypt is among the nominees for TIME’s Person of the Year 2012. I really wonder how can a respected magazine like TIME can even think to nominate a person who has adopted dictatorship and taken all executive, judicial and juridical powers in his hands against the will of the majority of the Egyptian people. I am kindly urging you and the panel in charge to omit his name immediately. Dictators can’t be chosen for this honor.

Abdessalam Diab, Cairo, Egypt



http://ideas.time.com/letters/drop-morsy-from-the-person-of-the-year-list/#ixzz2KbQK2nB6
 

Abdessalam Diab (150)
Monday February 11, 2013, 6:59 am
Sorry for the duplication . A computer mistake
 

. (0)
Monday February 11, 2013, 1:15 pm
Signed, thanks.
 
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