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CôTe d'Ivoire Cocoa Farmers Certified and Satisfied


Business  (tags: eco-friendly, sustainable, goodnews, organic, CoolStuff, environment, green, farming, ethics, economy, business, world, marketing, money, SustainableDevelopment, sustainabledevelopment )

JL
- 671 days ago - irinnews.org
Tens of thousands of Côte d'Ivoire cocoa farmers are reducing pesticide use, curbing soil erosion & water contamination & at the same time boosting yields and income thanks to certification schemes which are making their cocoa more attractive to foreign



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JL A. (276)
Monday February 18, 2013, 8:39 am
[French version of article available at the site]

Côte d’Ivoire cocoa farmers certified and satisfied

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Photo: Olivier Monnier/IRIN
Côte d’Ivoire cocoa farmers are boosting yields through certification schemes
ABIDJAN, 13 February 2013 (IRIN) - Tens of thousands of Côte d’Ivoire cocoa farmers are reducing pesticide use, curbing soil erosion and water contamination and at the same time boosting yields and income thanks to certification schemes which are making their cocoa more attractive to foreign buyers, say certification companies.

For example, more than 80,000 cocoa farmers in Côte d’Ivoire (and around 36,000 others in neighbouring Ghana) are enrolled in the Rainforest Alliance certification programme which requires producers to use farm and environmental management practices aimed at sustaining production in the long term.

“Before planting, we used to burn the fields, but we've been taught that it's not good so we stopped and now only use machetes to prepare the fields,” said Olivier Abeyao, a farmer in Abengourou in eastern Côte d’Ivoire. He explained that he has reduced pesticide use and is now planting 10-18 trees per hectare to be used for shade in his cocoa fields.

Certified farmers are linked with cocoa exporters and chocolate firms that finance their training and buy their produce. The companies take a share of the premium the farmers earn from certified cocoa.

Child labour, deforestation and low farmers’ incomes are major concerns for cocoa consumers, according to Rainforest Alliance.

Cocoa Barometer, a European network of NGOs and unions in the cocoa sector, says consumer demand, better brand reputation and transparency of the supply chain are other factors that make companies turn to certified cocoa.

Global production of certified cocoa increased fourfold between 2009 and 2011 to reach 474,000 tons in 2011 and is expected to grow to 2.2 million tons by 2020, according to Cocoa Barometer.

Côte d’Ivoire is the world’s top producer of cocoa (35 percent of world production). It is grown by around 900,000 farmers and sustains some 3.5 million livelihoods. In the 2011-2012 season it produced nearly 1.5 million tons.

As many as two million West African households live directly off cocoa and more than 20 million West Africans rely on the cocoa economy, but many farmers remain in deep poverty.

“The aim of Rainforest Alliance is to create value for cocoa producing communities by improving farm management practices, including productivity and resilience to climate change, strengthening farmer organizations and supporting local partners,” Eric Servat, senior manager in Rainforest Alliance's cocoa and spices programme, told IRIN.

“Besides taking care of the environment and our health, we get a premium, which is something good for us,” Abeyao said, revealing that he earned 150,000 CFA francs (US$300) in premiums in the 2011-2012 season which ended in September 2012.

“The farmer gets better paid for doing a better work. It is satisfying,” said Theodore Guetat, head of a cocoa cooperative of 1,100 farmers in Abengourou. “The quality of our production is much better.”

More farmers are willing to switch to certified cocoa, Guetat said. “If you don’t get your production certified, it’s not certain that you’ll manage to sell your cocoa in the future,” he said.

Not enough buyers?

However, some farmers told IRIN they have had difficulties finding buyers for their certified cocoa. “If you don't have a contract with an international company it may be difficult to sell the crop,” said Leon Edoukou Adou, a cocoa farmer and the head of a certified cooperative in Abengourou.

“We haven't found any buyer so we had to sell our cocoa beans as if they were regular beans, not certified,” said Adou, whose produce is certified by Fairtrade, another certification company.

Servat said reaching farmers outside cooperatives, and smaller plantation owners, was difficult. It thus trained farmers on sustainable farming methods; they in turn trained their colleagues outside the certification scheme.

Farmers working with Rainforest Alliance and UTZ, another certification company, sell their produce to exporters or chocolate manufacturers under agreements with the certification firms.
 

Teresa W. (703)
Monday February 18, 2013, 8:41 am
thank you
 

Ben Oscarsito (355)
Monday February 18, 2013, 9:40 am
You know what? -I don't trust Rainforest Alliance!
Here's another story: Child Slave Labor of Cocoa Plantations in Ivory Coast.
Background: Throughout the whole world, cocoa is demanded for the simple pleasure of chocolate. Many companies are buying and selling this delicious snack, with 80% of the cocoa being made in Western Africa, with 46% coming from the Ivory Coast. Farmers take up rural portions of this sub-Saharan area, growing and harvesting cocoa for the rest of the world to enjoy. However, many people do not know that a significant portion of the cocoa grown in the Ivory Coast is farmed by slaves, child slaves. Many of the children are trafficked in from neighbouring countries to be forced to grow and harvest cocoa....
To be continued:
http://jleech.wikispaces.com/Child+Slave+Labor+of+Cocoa+Plantations
 

JL A. (276)
Monday February 18, 2013, 9:48 am
Good point Ben--we need both this certification AND assurance not grown using child slave labor! You cannot currently send a star to Ben because you have done so within the last week.
You are welcome Teresa.
 

Michael Kirkby (86)
Monday February 18, 2013, 10:29 am
Thanks Ben. I love it when people try to give me chocolate and I politely decline. When they want to know why I quote the very same facts as Ben does.
 

Bee S. (208)
Monday February 18, 2013, 11:27 am
Thanks for this Important info, Ben. Child Slavery "just for Pleasure to enjoy" cannot say more...
 

Christeen Anderson (550)
Monday February 18, 2013, 11:31 am
The first part of the article sounded really good to me however something needs to be done about the child labor.
 

JL A. (276)
Monday February 18, 2013, 11:43 am
You cannot currently send a star to Michael because you have done so within the last week.
You cannot currently send a star to Bee because you have done so within the last week.
You cannot currently send a star to Christeen because you have done so within the last week.
 

Past Member (0)
Monday February 18, 2013, 12:02 pm
I always try and buy Fairtrade cocoa and coffee but not sure where it comes from obviously not there if they have child labour still

noted Thanks
 

Past Member (0)
Monday February 18, 2013, 1:40 pm
Excellent news. Thanks for the pick-me-up.
 

Angelika R. (144)
Monday February 18, 2013, 1:57 pm
great and input here-thanks JL AND BEN, that is important to know...and a shock. Guess I should not feel save and good any longer when buying "Fair Trade" chocolate as I've been doing for years,-saying nothing about slave /child labor as it addresses the trade only.
 

Angelika R. (144)
Monday February 18, 2013, 1:58 pm
"article" was missing there..
 

JL A. (276)
Monday February 18, 2013, 2:58 pm
You cannot currently send a star to Carol because you have done so within the last week.
You cannot currently send a star to Laura because you have done so within the last week.
You cannot currently send a star to Angelika because you have done so within the last week.
 

Birgit W. (152)
Monday February 18, 2013, 4:37 pm
Noted
 

Joan McAllister (1064)
Monday February 18, 2013, 9:53 pm
Sadly noted. Thanks J.L.
 

JL A. (276)
Monday February 18, 2013, 9:56 pm
You are welcome Joan
 

june t. (66)
Monday February 18, 2013, 11:19 pm
well, its a start. Now it's time to do something about the child slave labour thing.
 

JL A. (276)
Tuesday February 19, 2013, 6:09 am
You cannot currently send a star to june because you have done so within the last week.
 

Melania Padilla (185)
Tuesday February 19, 2013, 8:17 am
Very big deal, thanks
 

JL A. (276)
Tuesday February 19, 2013, 11:39 am
You cannot currently send a star to Melania because you have done so within the last week.
 

Theodore Shayne (56)
Tuesday February 19, 2013, 5:57 pm
I don't eat chocolate period. Ben's comments explain why.
 

JL A. (276)
Tuesday February 19, 2013, 6:04 pm
You cannot currently send a star to Theodore because you have done so within the last week.
 

Claudia Acosta (32)
Wednesday February 20, 2013, 7:54 am
Good for the farmers. Now I would like to know how they are going to find buyers.
 

JL A. (276)
Wednesday February 20, 2013, 10:22 am
You cannot currently send a star to Claudia because you have done so within the last week.
 
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