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'Most Energy-Efficient' Light Bulb Shines on Kickstarter


Science & Tech  (tags: energy, discovery, concept, design, environment, research, performance, NewTechnology, science, scientists, technology, light bulbs )

Michael
- 437 days ago - cbc.ca
An eye-catching invention that produces as much light as a 100-watt incandescent bulb using just an eighth of the power has become a crowdfunding star for three University of Toronto graduates.



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Comments

Michael O. (168)
Monday February 4, 2013, 8:37 pm
The Nanolight, billed as "the world's most energy-efficient light bulb" has raised $133,022 on the U.S. crowdfunding site Kickstarter and generated pre-orders for more than 3,000 bulbs since the project started seeking backers on Jan. 7.

The project had original hoped to raise $20,000.

"It's been incredible for us," said Gimmy Chu, product developer for Nanolight, the company he founded with Tom Rodinger and Christian Yan, two former teammates on the University of Toronto solar car project whom he met in 2005.

"What's next is to set up manufacturing lines so we can actually start producing for all our backers."

People who have pledged $30 or more to the project on Kickstarter can expect to be among the first to get one of three versions of the Nanolight shipped directly to them for free anywhere in the world:

- 10 watts, equivalent to a 75-watt incandescent bulb.
- 12 watts, equivalent to a 100-watt incandescent bulb.
- An even brighter 12-watt bulb, created "using the best components available without any regard for price."

"To get that kind of efficiency, we had to redesign the whole idea of an LED light bulb from the ground up," recalls Chu, who began working on the project with Rodinger and Yan about three years ago.

Their design consists of a circuit-board with LEDs attached to it, folded up into the shape of a light bulb that plugs into a regular lighting fixture.

"That way it kind of mimics the traditional incandescent light bulb in that it shines light in all directions," Chu said.

According to the Nanolight team, there are currently very few LED lighting products on the market as bright as a 100-watt incandescent bulb. The Nanolight is almost half as heavy as a compact fluorescent light bulb, and unlike fluorescent bulbs, it turns on instantly.

Potential customers will have the opportunity to pre-order the Nanolight on Kickstarter until March 8.

The Nanolight team is currently working on other light bulb models, including one that is dimmable.

 

mag.w.d. Aichberger (34)
Monday February 4, 2013, 10:01 pm
> a 100-watt incandescent bulb using just an eighth of the power
Yeah, and i'll believe it after i've measured it.

What's exatly what i've done with them toxic "Light-savings-bulbs" we have now, the producers' claims for which (concerning both light-output and durability) turned out to be more pissing-onto-the-consumer than providing data.
 

Roger Garin-michaud (60)
Tuesday February 5, 2013, 3:09 pm
noted, thanks !
 

John S. (294)
Wednesday February 6, 2013, 12:00 pm
Interesting, currently using some 2 watt leds that act as 25 watt. and they work much better than the CFL, the only problem is that you really need to have lamp shades because if you catch that led you will see spots for awhile.
 

Shanti S. (0)
Wednesday February 6, 2013, 12:10 pm
Thank you.
 

Nelson Baker (0)
Wednesday February 6, 2013, 3:25 pm
Interesting.
 

linda g. (3)
Wednesday February 6, 2013, 5:18 pm
Looking forward to using these, but feel I can wait for 'real'' time useage reports.
 

Winn Adams (178)
Thursday February 7, 2013, 1:33 am
Noted
 

Susan Allen (208)
Thursday February 7, 2013, 1:55 am
Interesting. Shared.
 

Brad Kraus (6)
Thursday February 7, 2013, 8:48 am
I applaud their ingenuity. LEDs can be dimmed, too, unlike most CFLs.
 

Sonia Minwer Barakat Reque (42)
Thursday February 7, 2013, 12:26 pm
Interesting.Thanks for sharing
 

Melania Padilla (165)
Monday February 11, 2013, 4:41 pm
Looks so pretty also!!!
 

Ruth R. (209)
Tuesday December 10, 2013, 5:22 am
Thank you for the post ! LET'S KEEP THE OLD REGULAR LIGHT BULBS ! THEY DO NOT HURT MY EYES, AND THEY DO NOT HAVE MERCURY !

Please consider:
" There is still mercury in the new LED light bulbs -- so will some kind men and women write petitions on stopping these "efficient light bulbs" from killing some men, women and children. PLEASE BAN LED LIGHT BULBS -- UNTIL YOU GET THE MERCURY OUT ! and I LIKE THE EFFICIENT INCADENCENT -- THE USUALL LIGHT ORDINARY LIGHT BULBS BETTER -- BECAUSE THEY ARE EASIER TO DISPOSE AND EASIER ON MY EYE-SIGHT ! Does any body have a clue -- how dangerous it is to have mercury in every man and women' home, bussiness, etc . and I have no other motives. I was all for LED Light bulbs -- untill hear that they have mercury, are hard to dispose, and MERCURY -- THAT IS DEADLY -- PLEASE BAN THE BULBS A little off -topic -- however -- that is another law suit or Petition?
 

Ruth R. (209)
Tuesday December 10, 2013, 6:12 am
WARNING: Possible hazard to vision[edit]
"Tests performed at the Complutense University of Madrid indicate that prolonged exposure to the shorter blue band spectrum LED lights may permanently damage the pigment epithelial cells of the retina. The test conditions were the equivalent of staring at a 100 watt blue incandescent source from 20 cm for 12 hours; researchers say additional testing is required to ascertain what intensities, wavelengths, and exposure times of LED lighting devices are lethal and non-lethal for retinal tissue.[37][38] '
 

Ruth R. (209)
Tuesday December 10, 2013, 6:28 am
Sorry -- made a mistake -- people are telling me that LED bulbs have mercury in them -- do they?
Do LED bulbs contain mercury ?
CFL Do- right ?
 

Ruth R. (209)
Tuesday December 10, 2013, 6:39 am
http://www.care2.com/greenliving/love-your-light-bulbs-easy-greening.html
From the article. " Mercury
Alas, the beloved CFL isn’t perfect. All fluorescent lights contain mercury. The good news is that the new generation of CFLs posses only a trace amount of mercury (4 mg), far less mercury than in thermometers (500 mg) or old thermostats (3000 mg). In terms of environmental mathematics, a power plant actually emits 10 mg of mercury to fuel the power needs of an incandescent light bulb compared to 2.4 mg required to produce the electricity to power a CFL for the same amount of time. There has been a lot of fear (and a few urban myths) circulated about toxins released from a broken bulb. Again, the amount of mercury is minimal, but you should take precaution in cleaning up a broken CFL.

TIP: How to clean up a broken CFL
• Using gloves, carefully scoop up the fragments and powder with stiff paper or cardboard and place them in a sealed plastic bag. DO NOT USE A VACUUM!
• Place all cleanup materials in a second sealed plastic bag.
• Take to a recycling center.
How to Recycle CFLs..."
Read more: http://www.care2.com/greenliving/love-your-light-bulbs-easy-greening.html#ixzz2n5CNv9cG
 

Ruth R. (209)
Tuesday December 10, 2013, 6:41 am
YES! MERCURY ! LARGE AMOUNT WILL GO TO STORAGE FACILITIES -- OR WHERE -- IS THERE A WAY TO RECYCLE MERCURY ?
From the article. " Mercury
Alas, the beloved CFL isn’t perfect. All fluorescent lights contain mercury. The good news is that the new generation of CFLs posses only a trace amount of mercury (4 mg), far less mercury than in thermometers (500 mg) or old thermostats (3000 mg). In terms of environmental mathematics, a power plant actually emits 10 mg of mercury to fuel the power needs of an incandescent light bulb compared to 2.4 mg required to produce the electricity to power a CFL for the same amount of time. There has been a lot of fear (and a few urban myths) circulated about toxins released from a broken bulb. Again, the amount of mercury is minimal, but you should take precaution in cleaning up a broken CFL.

TIP: How to clean up a broken CFL
• Using gloves, carefully scoop up the fragments and powder with stiff paper or cardboard and place them in a sealed plastic bag. DO NOT USE A VACUUM!
• Place all cleanup materials in a second sealed plastic bag.
• Take to a recycling center.
How to Recycle CFLs..."
Read more: http://www.care2.com/greenliving/love-your-light-bulbs-easy-greening.html#ixzz2n5CNv9cG
 

Ruth R. (209)
Tuesday December 10, 2013, 6:45 am
MISTAKE -- AGAIN -- THAT IS CFL'S -- as you can see.
 
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