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In the Shadow of Wounded Knee


Society & Culture  (tags: Pine Ridge Reservation, Oglala Lakota, Sioux Nation, South Dakota, National Geographic, Alex White Plume, Dusti Rose Jumping Eagle, Olowan Thunder Hawk Martinez )

Dandelion
- 694 days ago - ngm.nationalgeographic.com
After 150 years of broken promises, the Oglala Lakota people of the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota are nurturing their tribal customs, language, and beliefs. A rare, intimate portrait shows their resilience in the face of hardship.



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Comments

Dandelion G. (381)
Wednesday August 29, 2012, 1:18 pm
Anpetu Waste! Wishing you good thoughts and prayers as we await word on outcomes of all the hard work you have all done on behalf of Pe’ Sla! As soon as the Oceti Sakowin, the Great Sioux Nation informs us of the outcome of their private negotiations, we will inform all of you. We keep praying, smudging, hoping for good. We appreciate everyone’s contributions in helping this campaign, this fight for what is sacred – Pe’ Sla. Pilamaye!
Dr. Sarah Jumping Eagle

Please if you can donate even as much as $1 is gladly accepted. The story above will let you in on these people's lives a little more, and again I thank all those who have already donated.
Link To Donate

I can't help but think that Dr. Sarah Jumping Eagle, who is helping with this Fundraiser is related to the young girl in the story, Dusti Rose Jumping Eagle, that committed suicide at 15 years old. Conditions are hard on the Rez, it is so vital that these people can obtain Pe Sla, their Sacred grounds, so they have a place to refresh and restore to bring some peace to their lives by being able to go to the Sacred grounds whenever possible.
 

Pat B. (354)
Wednesday August 29, 2012, 2:23 pm
With respect...WOW!!! What a story, WOW!! Every school child should read this in the secondary and high school levels. Excellent, well written article. Thanks, Sheryl for this post.
 

Mary T. (188)
Wednesday August 29, 2012, 5:21 pm
What an wonderful story, I was really touched by this, Thanks Dandelion.
 

Jennifer C. (172)
Wednesday August 29, 2012, 5:22 pm
Great story. Thanks for sharing.
 

Penelope Ryan (172)
Wednesday August 29, 2012, 6:17 pm
Thanx , Sheryl....>>>>>>>>the government does little to heal the wounds, best the people re,member.....
 

Jenny Dooley (830)
Wednesday August 29, 2012, 7:50 pm
Thank you Sheryl
 

Edith B. (142)
Wednesday August 29, 2012, 9:09 pm
Thanks, Sheryl. I think more people should be made aware of these things. We certainly weren't taught them in school.
 

Nyack Clancy (428)
Wednesday August 29, 2012, 9:57 pm
Noted- thank you
 

Mike H. (217)
Wednesday August 29, 2012, 11:42 pm
I wish these people well
 

Patricia E. G. (78)
Thursday August 30, 2012, 2:11 am
Dramatic, sorted, painful...A waste of lives.
The horror to this horror story is you'll find this problem everywhere in
this country. Amongst the poverty stricken to the afluent. Alcoholism and drug abuse run rampant and suicide amongst teens is at an all time high.
Statistics are alarming. Thank you for this story Sheryl.
 

Arild Warud (159)
Thursday August 30, 2012, 3:33 am
Thanks for sharing this story Sheryl.
 

Georgeta Trandafir (33)
Thursday August 30, 2012, 5:00 am
Noted.
 

Michael Kirkby (83)
Thursday August 30, 2012, 8:06 am
Thank you.
 

paul m. (93)
Thursday August 30, 2012, 8:23 am


Thanks for bringing this to our attention...
 

tasunka m. (334)
Thursday August 30, 2012, 9:52 am
thanks Dandelion,having lived there I must say Hardship is putting it lightly.
 

Elsie Au (266)
Thursday August 30, 2012, 10:04 am
Thanks for sharing this.
 

Past Member (0)
Thursday August 30, 2012, 10:35 am
Thanks. I lost ancestors at that senseless slaughter.
 

Cutter Two Wheels (3)
Thursday August 30, 2012, 11:05 am
thank you for this beautiful article. might i also recommend the book 'on the rez' - a great portrait of strong people.
 

Susanne R. (249)
Thursday August 30, 2012, 11:11 am
I saw HBO's production of "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee." It was a very touching and eye-opening experience. Thanks for posting this, Dandelion!
 

Allan Yorkowitz (452)
Thursday August 30, 2012, 11:25 am
This nation's greatest national disgrace.
 

Russell R. (87)
Thursday August 30, 2012, 1:49 pm
I feel the Pain and Regret this Country's History, but, nothing has changed since then, not for the Native American, nor those who have made this our home. The lands of the People and the Native Americans are being taken away and raped of its sources all in the name of "Greed!" Nothing has Changed!"
 

Cliff Josephson (5)
Thursday August 30, 2012, 1:49 pm
FREE LEONARD PELTIER It is way past time for Leonard to go home. He was illegally convicted and has spent 29 years in prison because of coerced false accusations and a Gov't that didn't care if he was guilty or not. This is our greatest NATIONAL DISGRACE.
 

Yvonne White (231)
Thursday August 30, 2012, 3:23 pm
Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee is a great book that everyone should read..I read it in the 1970's & it was heart-breaking..:(
 

Rose NoFWDSPLZ (276)
Thursday August 30, 2012, 4:43 pm
I also read that book and cried
 

Tal H. (8)
Thursday August 30, 2012, 5:00 pm
Thanks for the article!
 

Lisa Sears (172)
Friday August 31, 2012, 4:46 am
Very interesting, informative, and well-written. Thanks for sharing.
 

Seda A. (4)
Friday August 31, 2012, 8:36 am
Thank you for sharin, great article.
 

Carmen Elisa Bonilla-Jones (1)
Friday August 31, 2012, 10:49 am
Sheryl, thank you for the story and the insights of Martinez and Plume. I would love to meet them. It is a pity that the US of A still cannot get things right, not even in an apology way past due.
 

Morgan McDowell (4)
Friday August 31, 2012, 11:48 am
Noted
 

Robert O. (12)
Friday August 31, 2012, 4:34 pm
Thanks Dandelion.
 

Michael Carney (207)
Friday August 31, 2012, 4:35 pm
Thanks, Sheryl...It's just heart breaking...I have so much respect for the Native Americans, and so much anger towards the Government, and all our ancestors whose greed and racism have almost destroyed a whole race of noble people...I just feel empty that this could be allowed to happen and continue on to this day...
 

Lois Jordan (55)
Friday August 31, 2012, 5:51 pm
Noted & Thanks, Dandelion. Reading this caused me some tears and some chills, but I feel so much more understanding and compassion. These are the stories that should be in our public school textbooks.
 

pam w. (191)
Friday August 31, 2012, 8:13 pm
It's about time! LONG OVERDUE....
 

Sandra M Z. (114)
Friday August 31, 2012, 9:31 pm
Excellent article and photo gallery, Thank you Dandelion.
 

Hartson Doak (32)
Friday August 31, 2012, 10:32 pm
We must look to our indigenous peoples for strength and guidance. In the beginning the old white men in Washington lies to them. Broke every promise. Now these speakers with forked tongues are coming for us all.
 

patrica and edw jones (190)
Saturday September 1, 2012, 1:48 am
Dandelion have sent a donation and will help wherever we can. God bless the Native Americans - and may they gain rightful ownership of their lands.
 

LucyKaleido ScopeEyes (79)
Saturday September 1, 2012, 6:06 am

I was surprised to find such an excellent article in the Nat Geographic, but as soon as I saw the author's name -Alexandra Fuller*- I understood that Nat Geo had gotten an outstanding writer. She traces some of the history of the Great Sioux Nation, from Wounded Knee to attempts by today's Oglala Lakota to heal the past and reclaim a positive identity for the people, with some backtracking for the killings of Sitting Bull & Crazy Horse, the Ghost Dancer movement.

Through her portrait of White Plume, I finally understood, felt, the 'seemingly calculated insult of Mount Rushmore,' right in the Black Hills. Nor did I know that the Sioux had rejected a $106-million award for the loss of the Black Hills -including 103 years’ worth of interest- upheld by the US Supreme Court in 1980, because the Black HIlls would never be for sale !!

Besides the article, there are several mix-media features well worth exploring, such as the photo gallery, the Pine Ridge Community Storytelling Project (created by the photographer & 'Cowbird'), & the maps, entitled "Land Lost," which shows how the original 'Great Sioux Reservation' shrank over time, from 1851
to present day.

So thank you, Dandelion, for posting this important article and features.

*Alexandra Fuller was born & grew up in colonial & subsequently civil-war-torn Rhodesia, now Zimbabwe, but moved to Wyoming years ago; author of 4 non-fiction books, including "The Legend of Colton H. Bryant," that tells the story of a Wyoming man who would've been one of yesterday's cowboys, but today forced to work on an oil rig. I 'discovered' her from an interview on a French literary TV program.
 

Dandelion G. (381)
Saturday September 1, 2012, 6:45 am
Thank you PeasantDiva for you well composed comment and for the additional information on Alexandra Fuller.

I am glad a few more people are understanding the symbolic pain the faces etched in stone are at Mt Rushmore, for the American Indian, being their most Sacred and spiritual spot. Many view those carved faces as a wonder, a tourist place to go see one day, however when I see those faces, my heart sinks.

Even MSNBC, that tries to be a bit more progressive had a spot on with Chris Matthews, showing him with Mount Rushmore off his shoulder and speaking about American Exceptionalism, I just want to throw my shoe at the TV, as so many really still don't understand or "get it", for even the most educated are still uneducated when it comes to the American Indian.

Thank you Patricia and Edward for a donation to help obtain Pe Sla, looks like the only way the Native people are ever going to regain some of the Black Hills to be under their protective care once more. For those who would like to get in on the Fundraiser there is still time to help them. Link is below.
Link To Donate

Hartson, no truer words were spoken, this is a good reminder as to when we don't stand up for our brothers and sisters the next to fall may be ourselves. When we turn a blind eye and don't speak up for an injustice to one it can become our own fate at some point.

I appreciate those who took the time to read this article and even to go through the photos and other links offered. I as well appreciate that National Geographic did this piece as it reaches people who might not of otherwise learned of what was presented.
 

Dandelion G. (381)
Saturday September 1, 2012, 6:45 am
Thank you PeasantDiva for you well composed comment and for the additional information on Alexandra Fuller.

I am glad a few more people are understanding the symbolic pain the faces etched in stone are at Mt Rushmore, for the American Indian, being their most Sacred and spiritual spot. Many view those carved faces as a wonder, a tourist place to go see one day, however when I see those faces, my heart sinks.

Even MSNBC, that tries to be a bit more progressive had a spot on with Chris Matthews, showing him with Mount Rushmore off his shoulder and speaking about American Exceptionalism, I just want to throw my shoe at the TV, as so many really still don't understand or "get it", for even the most educated are still uneducated when it comes to the American Indian.

Thank you Patricia and Edward for a donation to help obtain Pe Sla, looks like the only way the Native people are ever going to regain some of the Black Hills to be under their protective care once more. For those who would like to get in on the Fundraiser there is still time to help them. Link is below.
Link To Donate

Hartson, no truer words were spoken, this is a good reminder as to when we don't stand up for our brothers and sisters the next to fall may be ourselves. When we turn a blind eye and don't speak up for an injustice to one it can become our own fate at some point.

I appreciate those who took the time to read this article and even to go through the photos and other links offered. I as well appreciate that National Geographic did this piece as it reaches people who might not of otherwise learned of what was presented.
 

Veronique L. (210)
Saturday September 1, 2012, 10:03 am
Thank you for posting; very interesting article!
 

Elizabeth M. (66)
Saturday September 1, 2012, 1:36 pm
Noted this most educational, interestting article of the Oglala Sioux with the interviews of Alex White Plume and
Olowan Thunder Hawk Martinez. I still have tears in my eyes from the stories of killings, hardships & poverty.For what the US Government, FBI etc. did at Wounded Knee and having never given a proper apology, they shall never be forgiven and will have to live with their racist, hateful ways. I pray that Pe' Sla, a part of the Black Hills on Sacred Grounds be under the care of the Great Sioux nation again, so they may go to refresh and restore and to bring some peace to their lives. Thank You so very much Dandelion G.! and the National Geographic.Awaiting the news of Pe' Sla.
 

Michael M. (58)
Saturday September 1, 2012, 2:33 pm
Anpetu washte means good day, and also means beautiful day:

There are some traditional Lakota who spoke with understanding of having experienced the thoughts that flew during the time between Wounded Knee and a return to the vision of their youth.

Trading is something which always occurred among tribes, every group dispersed on this great earth.
Because good feelings are deservedly sacred, trading has many other attributes than the exchange of different goods.
But since the early times of trading with some termed wasicu (takers of fat - perhaps from the first fur traders), a substance that blocks the understanding and prevents the coherence of vision was introduced. The Lakota called it mne wakan: the unknowable or mystery water. Those of you who have used it understand what it does, and how attractive it can be under certain circumstances. It is not a product of any value except one.

It makes you forget for a time, makes you lose contact with thought and grief; it promotes your feeling good; but bundled in its effects and more important, it promotes your physical response rage, which is a rejection of grief, among other things. Wait, please while I try to tie some things together.

Because strange things can seem a mystery, unobtainable among the people and place which trades for them, they are connected to an idea: that the attributes, powers to have or get some things (think of gunpowder invented by the Chinese) can be associated with ability to more easily get needed food and other advantages.
Many people have understood that the gifts of the powers of earth (think of the sun's warmth and light, the water of storms that clearly helps life to spring from the earth, for just two) can be found through sincere seeking - prayer, which leads to strong focus and understanding. And this is true in our kind.
So if a stranger comes, claiming that sincere attempt to understand powers he claims to exist, are necessary to give your attention to, the gifts he appears to have been given can easily be taken for gifts of such a power.

So, it becomes easy to believe that such claims are true and that the very powers you and your people could see, have been intimate with for uncountable seasons, are less than such power by which a claim has been made for these other, momentarily superior-seeming gifts, which, remember can be bundled with poisonous things and beings (who are, after all, only defensive).

Are your people, so long intimate and gifted, less than these others, who have cheated you with hidden poisons among their bundle of ease-making gifts? What then did they fear, those who brought you wrong? It can take a while to understand that material goods have drawbacks as well as advantages. When this is seen, then no gift comes from special favor.

The sacred is wrapped in itself: respect. When this wrapping is not truly present, then what inheres is not sacred. If an agreement or a claim to friendship is seen to lack respect, then such words are not sacred.

The Oceti Sakowin are a people who recognize the sacred.

Oceti Sakowin and Tssitssitsa learned after fighting that each understood respect for sacred earth and its beings. In that communication and understanding, they shared many things: friendship, the Sundance where the prayer is "help my people, my relatives". The choice to suffer is a way some show undeniable sincerity, and respect without bounds is unhidden before the sun. They shared the new ways of horse, of joyous skill, just as the gentle skills of other things had been shared long before. They share the recognition of the sacred centers, the directions, the shape and meanings of our temporary camps upon the earth. Other peoples share many of these things as well; those who cannot or do not share the sacred but replace it with some cutoff vision of another, cutoff from what is all around; such people are achingly hollow, without this greatest gift.
Money, things made, poison, can be as false as lies, never nurturing, filling the center. I have mentioned elsewhere which people are the poorest in money, and you can find it in the US statistics on the Dakotas. Yet it may be that the Lakota are not at all poor, as money is only an in-between thing. The sacred is knowing what is wealth, and knowing that all that we experience gives us constant looks within as well as into the clear and far.

To hold to what was known to be sacred is strength as well. The seven rituals have meaning, and that meaning has to do with coming awake, to wisdom. Things which assuage pain run counter to what Sundance and Hanbleceya peoples know: that evading the spiritual effort brings nothing.

It is hard to unbundle and separate alcohol from a life. Think how easy it would make the pain of a chooser in a Sundance. But then it would make the choice a false one.

I have seen the very Tunkasila which was exploded (by gunpowder/dynamite) into the faces of men, and another going on which purports to memorialize one who stood against such desecration. I have seen the incessant and pretentious roar of motors in August, that makes some feel as if they control Thunderbeings (but one day it was so easy to laugh: the real storms moved and the motorcycle riders huddled, soaked under trees, cold and suffering, not even understanding what is power, and how all they sought was shelter, survival).

Dandelion, go sometime to stand away from those faces cut like a wound into the stone - stand far enough to see how small they are. There are a lot of nearby places from which you can do so. Or, stand upon them, if this can still be done, and see that what is, is stone. I've seen that kind of stone elsewhere, even as a huge piece crashed down nearby, as well as watched when the earth itself quaked and brought down the face of a mountainside, changing it in a moment.

The Lakota stand at the center of this continent which has been called by others Turtle Island, from ancient power which brought up the land from the vast waters, slowly and suddenly, to become fertile in the sun.

When someone speaks of the sacred, some language must be different than the common language used, as if one's real name is different than the names called. If the whole language is different in such a way, those who speak it may have access to constant knowledge of what is truly sacred.

It seems as if many now identify a difference within themselves, between feelings of things that might be sacred and other feelings resulting from their experiences.

To offer false payment for the sacred is not to understand it. I hope that you all at care2 will recognize and not take false payment for what is sacred. Then you will surely find it.
 

Diane K. (136)
Saturday September 1, 2012, 4:06 pm
noted. thank you for sharing.
 

Glenville J O. (0)
Saturday September 1, 2012, 4:34 pm
Thank you for sharing the story Dandelion. It's so sad that some people are unwilling to live and let live.
 

Past Member (0)
Saturday September 1, 2012, 11:24 pm
We are one family. No one and no thing is to be treated or thought of otherwise.
 

Tal H. (8)
Sunday September 2, 2012, 5:19 pm
Thanks for the info!!
 

Robert Hardy (67)
Sunday September 2, 2012, 8:03 pm
A story worth reading.
 

Judy C. (106)
Sunday September 2, 2012, 9:14 pm
This is a great article, Dandelion. This morning I posted another article that was part of this Pine Ridge coverage in National Geographic. I hope people will be sure they don't miss all the personal stories that the Pine Ridge residents have submitted, and are continuing to submit to the author, Aaron Huey.on the cowbird.com website.


In the Shadow of Wounded Knee - Pine Ridge Community Storytelling Project, Introduction

 

Frans Badenhorst (547)
Monday September 3, 2012, 3:24 am
very good story, thanks...so glad GOOD news still exists
 

paul m. (93)
Monday September 3, 2012, 8:10 am

Thanks for bringing this too our attention...
 

Diane B. (275)
Wednesday September 5, 2012, 12:42 am
Thanks Sheryl for posting this. It intrest me a lot !!
 

Dandelion G. (381)
Wednesday September 5, 2012, 6:34 am
Tribes Reach Deal to Purchase Pe Sla
TRIBES REACH DEAL TO PURCHASE PE SLA

“If we don’t start uniting and coming together as people then people are going to continue to walk all over us,” said Robin LeBeau, tribal councilwoman for the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, at the press conference. “It doesn’t matter if we’re from Cheyenne River or if we’re from Arizona or from New York or our sisters and brothers from up in Canada.”

We can ALL learn from this standing in Solidarity with each other. That when we do, much can be accomplished.

For those who had a part of this wonderful event that is reaching a postive goal, feel good in your hearts, you truly were part of a historic moment of obtaining the Sacred. May this Sacredness of our Earth Mother reach out to all corners of our Mother, for all her children to come to an understanding, that our Mother is Sacred for our survival.

This has been a good thing for us all. Mitakuye Oyasin

LILILILILILILILI
 

Angelika R. (146)
Wednesday September 5, 2012, 1:47 pm
Thank you Sheryl for the heads up in your message and comment on my thread, sorry, I simply missed this.
But I have seen this NG article mentioned on either the LRI or the indiancountry website and visited it, what I consider to be an outstanding unprecidented work! Have yet to explore all of the interactive links but know it will be excellent.
I do remember when Aaron Huey came out with his photo project about PR rez and I guess it was you (?) who had made a post of it then in 2010. It had me touched and fascinated then and I never forgot. Ever since I've been supporting those people as good as I can, usually donate to the Running Strong org., American Indian Youth, as that matters most to me.
 

. (0)
Wednesday September 5, 2012, 2:57 pm
Thanks Sheryl..
 

Dandelion G. (381)
Wednesday September 12, 2012, 5:01 pm
Pe' Sla Owners Accept $9 Million Offer From Tribes
Rosebud Sioux Tribe serving as a representative for the group of Lakota/Nakota/Dakota tribes involved in the purchase process has until November 30 to pay the remaining $8.1 million.

All of the monies raised on the Last Real Indians website will be used to purchase Pe' Sla. Those who contributed on C2, helped to forward the information around, and was able to give others an opportunity to donate should feel very good about themselves.

"This is a beautiful thing that has happened,” says Gay Kingman, executive director of The Great Plains Tribal Chairmans Association. “It feels really good, especially from what our spiritual leaders tell us, they are praying and guiding us as well, they are saying that if we move forward in a spiritual way this is doable. If politics or anything gets in the way, we do not know what will happen.”
 

LucyKaleido ScopeEyes (79)
Wednesday September 12, 2012, 7:56 pm

There are other relevant articles in Indian Country Today, and at least one is not celebratory in tone:
Pe’ Sla Purchase: Not Out of the Woods Yet: ".../... RST President Rodney M. Bordeaux has stated to the public, “We have secured funding for the earnest money deposit of Pe’Sla,” the purchase is not final.
According to Debra White Plume, a resident of Pine Ridge, information stating Pe’ Sla has been saved is not entirely correct. “Somehow the word is being put out there that we won and that Pe’ Sla has been saved. That message is wrong,” said White Plume.

According to her, the initial process in that the Oglala Sioux Tribe asked a federal agency to intervene and the Black Hills were taken off public auction, was correct, however, after working with Last Real Indians (LRI) the tribes only made a down payment.

In previous releases, stated amounts collected to help with the purchase of the sacred site included $1.3 million put up by the Rosebud Sioux Tribe and LastRealIndians.com, headed by attorney Chase Iron Eyes, which has raised more than $326,000. The funds were combined for the earnest offer made to the Reynolds family.

The down payment, according to White Plume, has not yet sealed the deal.

“The remainder of the purchase price still has to be paid to the Reynolds family, which is in about 21 days or so,” said White Plume. “So LRI is still raising funds to pitch in with the tribes. Until that final amount of money is paid in full, the land has not been returned to the Lakota people.

Though White Plume says she is aware of some facts, she does not know details because tribal council meetings have been private due to their sensitive nature.

“Everyone is speculating on what will happen,” she said.

Iron Eyes also said the Rosebud Sioux Tribe has been strategically tight-lipped about the process and that he knew as much as White Plume. “That’s where I am at too. Rosebud is the tribe holding all of the information now, so I am not sure. Except that they have made an earnest money deposit.”

“We don’t know if there is an agreed amount. I know that at this point they have been dealing with the auctioneer only. I don’t know that the owners have even been part of this process.”

Iron Eyes said that though the negotiations were private, he was optimistic to see the coming together of the tribes.
Though White Plume says the tribe is looking into the possibility of financing in order to purchase Pe’ Sla, details of the arrangement are not being released. .../... "


So it seems, from that part of the article I printed above that there is some confusion, perhaps a great deal of confusion, about whether the remaining $8.1 million will be available for the November deadline. Can the tribes come up with eight million dollars in just two months? That is the question. What do you think, Dandelion? Do tribes have savings or community financial reserves that can be allocated to the purchase of Pe’ Sla?

If they do not now already have this great sum ready for the deadline, how will they go about raising it in under TWO MONTHS?

The last sentence in the article is "To donate money through Last Real Indians, visit their indiegogo site" @http://www.indiegogo.com/PeSla-LakotaHeartland, which seems a clear indication that the necessary funds have not been raised for the final payment.

Yet, on the indiegogo site, they announce that the fundraising is over-- 'Fundraising ends September 8'-- & that they have raised $389,086 of the $1,000,000 Goal. The different perks/amounts to donate are no longer active; you can no longer click them to make a donation.

 

Angelika R. (146)
Thursday September 13, 2012, 3:27 am
that is true Jill, that campaign has ended as was announced. And the article you cite above is outdated, it appeared before the now agreement was reached. Of course they still need to get the rest, those 8,1 M, together, as Sheryl's post above states from that article. Guess you probably posted your comment before Sheryl's had appeared here.;-) I also posted these latest news of Sept 12 on my thread http://www.care2.com/news/member/153110506/3446529
 

Dandelion G. (381)
Thursday September 13, 2012, 10:18 am
I would direct any further inquiries to this or where to donate, as $8 million more needs to be raised to:

Contact Info:
Alfred Walking Bull
Communications Specialist

Rosebud Sioux Tribe
11 Legion Avenue
PO Box 420
Rosebud, South Dakota 57570

605-747-5755, ext. 25
rstcommunications@gmail.com

OR......Contact
A. Gay Kingman
Greater Plains Tribal Chairman Association
2040 W. Main St. Suite 112
Rapid City, South Dakota 57702
Phone (605) 791-4050
Email gptca@yahoo.com
 
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