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The Daughter of Dawn


Society & Culture  (tags: The Daughter of Dawn, silent film, all American Indian cast, 1920, wichita Mountains, Oklahoma Historical Society )

Dandelion
- 739 days ago - newsok.com
Silent film thought to be lost is restored by the Oklahoma Historical Society "The Daughter of Dawn" was shot in the summer of 1920 in the Wichita Mountains of southwest Oklahoma using an American Indian cast.



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Comments

Dandelion G. (385)
Friday December 7, 2012, 10:56 am
This line put a particular lump in my throat.

“A lot of these people were pre-reservation Indians, who had been wandering free out on the Plains,” Blackburn said. “Some of the people in that movie were in their 60s and 70s. They would have been young warriors out on the battle trail.

“And here they are depicting warriors again in their own gear, with their own tepee. That affects me every time I talk about it.” said Bob Blackburn, executive director of the Oklahoma Historical Society

 

Christeen Anderson (549)
Friday December 7, 2012, 12:06 pm
Thank you for sharing this with us.
 

Jim Phillips (3201)
Friday December 7, 2012, 12:27 pm
Glad to have seen this short film, restored by the Oklahoma Historical Society,
and put on video here to be seen once again.

Ty, Dandelion.
.
 

Vincenzo Correale (197)
Friday December 7, 2012, 12:55 pm
Thanks!
 

Richard Zane Smith (86)
Friday December 7, 2012, 1:28 pm
pre-history touching history.....very cool
 

Rose NoFWDSPLZ (280)
Friday December 7, 2012, 1:46 pm
Amazing Ty Dandelion
 

Terrie Williams (773)
Friday December 7, 2012, 2:58 pm
Thank you, Sheryl.
 

Kit B. (276)
Friday December 7, 2012, 2:59 pm

Direct descendants of Quanah Parker, that alone makes this a remarkable piece of American history. I hope this film will so be made available to everyone from PBS, I would like to see the full film. The background story of Cynthia Parker and Rachel Parker Plummer are fascinating stories, as is the history of Quanah Parker. Thanks Dandelion, you reignited some brain cells.
 

AniMae Chi (432)
Friday December 7, 2012, 3:16 pm
Thank you.
Do we get to see the whole movie?
 

Mary T. (185)
Friday December 7, 2012, 3:24 pm
Awesome, Thanks Dandelion for sharing this touching part of history.
 

Devon Leonard (54)
Friday December 7, 2012, 3:48 pm
Beautiful that this film was preserved for so long just waiting to bring blessings!! Would love to see the entire film.... thanx Dandelion.
 

Jennifer C. (169)
Friday December 7, 2012, 4:35 pm
Great article. Thanks for posting.
 

Tazz Miller (39)
Friday December 7, 2012, 5:05 pm
Very good.
Thank you !
:)
 

Elle B. (82)
Friday December 7, 2012, 6:19 pm
Thank-you Dandelion. . .tight throat and heart. . .
 

Lois Jordan (58)
Friday December 7, 2012, 6:30 pm
Noted w/thanks, Dandelion.
 

Krystal R. (123)
Friday December 7, 2012, 7:13 pm
Thank you so much, very good! inspiring
 

Susanne R. (249)
Friday December 7, 2012, 9:01 pm
What a fascinating story, Dandelion! I can't even imagine how Sammy White felt when he saw his mother as a very young woman in the film! I'm glad they were able to restore the film and that it will be well cared for and available for others to see.
 

Edwin M. (356)
Friday December 7, 2012, 11:50 pm
Thank you for this Sheryl.
 

Sonja Rowland (55)
Saturday December 8, 2012, 1:00 am
Thank you Dandelion for sharing this.
Is there a petition for asking for this film to be made public?
I'd be more than prepared to buy a copy.
 

James Travers (49)
Saturday December 8, 2012, 1:09 am
Very cool. The clip mentions it will be released on DvD. I'll be watching for it.
 

Roxy H. (334)
Saturday December 8, 2012, 1:43 am
Always a pleasure to see your postings Dandelion, with honor
 

Arild Warud (169)
Saturday December 8, 2012, 1:53 am
Thanks for sharing Sheryl.
 

Ancil S. (175)
Saturday December 8, 2012, 1:57 am
Fascinating! I want the DVD!!
 

Iona Kentwell (134)
Saturday December 8, 2012, 2:57 am
So amazing! I can't wait to see the film.
 

SuSanne P. (186)
Saturday December 8, 2012, 4:08 am
Thank you Dandelion. Although this is just so wrong on so many levels this is such good news to learn this footage is being shared. I wish the tepee will eventually land at the Smithsonian. As much as you teach me the more I realize I haven't a clue as to the horrors. I am ashamed.
 

Ben Oscarsito (351)
Saturday December 8, 2012, 4:40 am
Thank You, Sheryl for enlighten us!
 

Veronica G. (108)
Saturday December 8, 2012, 4:52 am
Sheryl, I too was moved by the paragraph you quoted in your comment; I highlighted it and copied to put in my comment, then I read YOUR comment and hey, we both had the same thought. The whole story of the past warriors playing parts in the film is somewhat conflicting for me. It's so sad that they had lost so much, but that they were still so proud of their ancestry. How wonderful that the film has been found. Lovely post.
 

Dandelion G. (385)
Saturday December 8, 2012, 5:38 am
The story, played by an all-Indian cast of 300 Kiowas and Comanches, includes a four-way love story, two buffalo hunt scenes, a battle scene, village scenes, dances, deceit, courage, hand to hand combat, love scenes, and a happy ending. The Indians, who had been on the reservation less than fifty years, brought with them their own tipis, horses, clothing, and material culture. The lead actor is White Parker, the son of the great Comanche leader Quanah Parker.

In the film, the Daughter of Dawn is played by Esther LeBarre. Her character is the daughter of the Chief of the Kiowas, played by Hunting Horse. The two young men who are romantically interested in her are White Eagle, played by White Parker, and Black Wolf, played by Jack Sankadota. Dawn loves White, but the Chief says that Wolf has many ponies so he must consider both as potential husbands for his daughter. So, Wolf loves Dawn. Dawn loves White. White loves Dawn. And for good measure a fourth person is added to this love triangle. Red Wing, played by Wanada Parker, is in love with Wolf. Both White Parker and Wanada Parker were children of the Comanche Chief Quanah Parker.

The script for the movie was developed by Norbert Myles, an actor, writer, and director brought into the project by Richard Banks, who started the Texas Film Company in 1916. Myles wrote on the cover of his script that, "This story has been made possible by R.E. Banks, whose knowledge of the Indian, and of his traditions, was gained during the twenty-five years that he lived with them."

For further release information you can find an email address at:
Press Release

 

Gloria picchetti (300)
Saturday December 8, 2012, 5:40 am
I am glad they found The Daughter of Dawn.
 

Pat B. (354)
Saturday December 8, 2012, 5:45 am
Thank you, Dandelion for this, sending this post on to friends as well.
 

Lindsay Kemp (1)
Saturday December 8, 2012, 6:55 am
Fascinating - thatnks for sharing
 

Kath P. (10)
Saturday December 8, 2012, 6:57 am
I watched the film clip and was totally blown away by the decorated tepee.
 

Angelika R. (144)
Saturday December 8, 2012, 1:58 pm
A highly appreciated share, thanks so much Sheryl. This is certainly a lost treasure found and what a blessing!
That tipi is awesome with the drawings on it of what appears to be battle scenes involving the US army.
What at first glance looks like an accident,- this investigator receiving the old silver nitrate film (what a historically precious item!) as "payment", then wanting to sell it and from there on reaching the right people all along up to this remarkable result-, is certainly not coincidental but foreordination and a blessing. That is my view at least.
I am very pleased that the film is planned to be available on a wide range including outside the US as well!
 

Past Member (0)
Saturday December 8, 2012, 2:07 pm
view this one if you dare to see truth today. http://vimeo.com/47043218
 

Past Member (0)
Saturday December 8, 2012, 2:12 pm
My great great grandmother on my mother's side was Kiowa in Northern Texas Hill Country. My grandfathers on my father's side were the last chiefs of the Wicocomoco.
 

Mary Donnelly (47)
Saturday December 8, 2012, 2:15 pm
Thanks again Dandelion.
 

Dandelion G. (385)
Saturday December 8, 2012, 2:57 pm
Thank you Yvette for placing the link on here, I'll hotlink it below. Something that everyone should view. I did see the TED talk mentioned in this video, very powerful, and I'm glad this young mans heart was touched. I hope more awareness is brought forth, this is a travesty ongoing that few do anything about.

I had placed the story on C2 that was mentioned about in the National Geographic, anyone wanting to look it over the link is here, it has a lot of information, very nicely done and there is a lot to it. Please take your time learning.
In The Shadow of Wounded Knee

Link that Yvette left:
Honor The Treaties
 

Petra M. (255)
Saturday December 8, 2012, 2:59 pm
Thank you for sharing!
 

Gloria Morotti (14)
Saturday December 8, 2012, 3:50 pm
thanks.
 

Mariette G. (152)
Saturday December 8, 2012, 4:07 pm
Amazing! Thanks for sharing Sheryl!
 

june t. (66)
Saturday December 8, 2012, 11:33 pm
Wow. I hope this will be shown on TV at some point, I would love to see it.
 

monka blanke (84)
Sunday December 9, 2012, 2:50 pm
thanks for posting !! I'll be waiting for the DVD.
 

Sandra M Z. (114)
Sunday December 9, 2012, 10:40 pm
Look forward to seeing the movie.

Here is a link to "Friends of Pine Ridge". There are many donation drives ongoing so a person can always send a Care Package up there and Make a Difference! (copy & paste)

http://www.friendsofpineridgereservation.org/

I had seen the National Geographic essay, but not the Vimeo story, Thank you Yvette. The mural is beautiful and will increase awareness.

Noted, Thank you Dandelion for keeping us informed.
 

Dandelion G. (385)
Monday December 10, 2012, 5:24 am
Thank you Sandra for the additonal information. The hotlink to what you left is below.
Friends of Pine Ridge Reservation
 

Lin Penrose (92)
Monday December 10, 2012, 8:30 am
Noted and read with interest and appreciation. Thanks Dandelion.
 

Liliana D. (124)
Tuesday December 11, 2012, 11:43 am
Rare piece of film history, glad that it had been restore, thank you for sharing
 

. (0)
Monday December 17, 2012, 12:29 pm
Thanks Sheryl...very touching
 

Henriette Matthijssen (148)
Thursday December 27, 2012, 11:37 am
Thanks SuSanne for the forward & Thanks Dandelion for the post, I will look forward to see the full movie!
 

Dorothy N. (63)
Thursday December 27, 2012, 12:37 pm
Isn't that marvelous?

Also makes you wonder how many more historical records of the type are floating around...

Thanks so much, Dandelion, for posting this!

 

Yvonne White (233)
Thursday December 27, 2012, 5:24 pm
This is SO COOL! :) Thanks so much Dandelion!
 

Lyn Z. (291)
Thursday December 27, 2012, 6:01 pm
Thanks Dandelion, and SuSanne for fwd.
 

Myraida Diaz (127)
Saturday December 29, 2012, 7:57 am
Thank You SuSanne for forward! Thank You Dandelion for bringing it to Care2! Very interesting. My heart shrinks though. Let's see if someone take the time and the interest to give form to a proyect to bring all this info in an easy way to schools and the public in general. Thanks for the links friends!
 
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