START A PETITION 25,136,189 members: the world's largest community for good
START A PETITION
x

Petition | Asus: Respond to Death of a 14-Year Old Child Worker at Your Factory | Change.Org


Society & Culture  (tags: abuse, childabuse, slavery, slavelabor, workersrights, technologyindustry, Taiwan )

BMutiny
- 484 days ago - change.org
A 14-year old boy named Liu Fuzong died suddenly on May 21, 2013 at Dongguan Jinchuan Electronic Company, Ltd., a factory which currently produces computer motherboards for ASUS, a leading technology company in Taiwan. He worked 12 hours/day 30 days/month



Select names from your address book   |   Help
   

We hate spam. We do not sell or share the email addresses you provide.

Comments

BMutiny TCorporationsEvil (467)
Friday June 28, 2013, 8:56 am
A 14-year old boy named Liu Fuzong died suddenly on May 21, 2013 at Dongguan Jinchuan Electronic Company, Ltd., a factory which currently produces computer motherboards for ASUS, a leading technology company in Taiwan whose products are in a broad range of tech products around the world. So far, ASUS has remained silent on this incident, and we demand the company to issue a response.

The boy, who worked 12 hours a day, 30 days a month, most likely died from overwork. Workers at Jinchuan, some of whom are children under the age of 16, all worked 12 hours a day or even longer if production quotas required it.

So far, this tragedy has drawn attention from the international community with 30 different news agencies from countries around the world reporting on it, including outlets in the United States, Britain, Germany, and Italy.

However, ASUS have remained silent on the death of Liu Fuzong and the use of child labor at its supplier factory. We therefore demand an immediate response from ASUS regarding what it will do about the boy’s death and, further, what it will do to stop the use of child workers in its supplier factories and to promote labor rights in these factories.
 

BMutiny TCorporationsEvil (467)
Friday June 28, 2013, 8:58 am
To:
Jerry Shen, CEO, (510) 739-3777
Jonney Shih, Chairman, (510) 739-3777
Godwin Yan, Senior Director of Operations, (510) 739-3777, ext 4519
Issue a public response to the death of a 14-year old child worker at your supplier factory Jinchuan Electronics in Dongguan, China. Moreover, tell the public what you will do to prevent child labor from being used in your supply chain.

Sincerely,
[Your name]
 

Sue H. (7)
Friday June 28, 2013, 8:59 am
Noted and sad to have to sign, thanks.
 

BMutiny TCorporationsEvil (467)
Friday June 28, 2013, 9:03 am
The sudden death may be slightly unusual -
but I have a feeling that the conditions the teenager worked under are not unusual at all - and that this isn't the ONLY factory with such potentially lethal conditions.

Think about that when you buy or use your computer and other high-tech products... they come at a HUMAN COST. Like Slavery, NO DIFFERENT. These children HAVE to work like this - for economic reasons!
The World Economy is SET UP THAT WAY...
 

. (0)
Friday June 28, 2013, 9:04 am
SHANGHAI - China: exhausting shifts of 12 hours in the factory, a 14-year-old Liu Fuzong, dies while working. This was revealed by China Labor Watch, a US-based organization that fights for the rights of workers in China.

According to information gathered, the young man was found dead in bed dorm company Yinchuan Electronic Company, Ltd. of Dongguan, a city not far from Guangzhou, the former Canton, in the southern province of Guangdong.

Liu died, according to the official documents, for 'immediate death' on May 21. He had been hired on February 27 using the document of an eighteen year old.

The Yinchuan, 3CEMS company owned by the Group (which works on behalf of Samsung, Canon and Sony), produces PC motherboards for Asus and was already the subject of complaints to child labor.
Not only that, according to testimony from employees, young workers often working students, regardless of their age, they work with 12-hour shifts, with two interruptions for meals, with the opportunity to work for an additional 12 hours of overtime if the production requires it.
In recent years, several students have come to the factory of Sichuan, also under the age of 16 years.

My work is in Italian IT i know very well the brand Asus
#2.624 So signed and noted - thank you BMutiny
 

Ben Oscarsito (317)
Friday June 28, 2013, 9:14 am
Done!
 

Mael van der Vliet (25)
Friday June 28, 2013, 9:15 am
Noted and signed. Thank you ! :)
 

Christeen Anderson (515)
Friday June 28, 2013, 9:16 am
Signed.
 

Natasha Salgado (543)
Friday June 28, 2013, 9:19 am
Just so sad---children this age should be playing and eating ice-cream pops and working 12 hrs a day. Pitiful. S+S-thx BM
 

BMutiny TCorporationsEvil (467)
Friday June 28, 2013, 9:49 am
Of course these are Killing conditions even for those OVER the age of eighteen -

I have heard that the Industries like to hire them as young as possible, turning a blind eye to the well-known fact that the kids often lie about their ages to get desperately-needed jobs for their families' survival -

because the younger kids have smaller and "more nimble" fingers to do detailed work faster -
that's what I've heard.
Just USE 'EM UP AND THROW THEM AWAY... disposable people...

[Yeah, a fourteen-year-old looks just like an eighteen-year-old, who can tell the difference?]
 

Frances Darcy (219)
Friday June 28, 2013, 12:06 pm
done
 

Past Member (0)
Saturday June 29, 2013, 11:55 pm
Signed
with 2,670 supporters
2,330 NEEDED
 

AniMae Chi (415)
Sunday June 30, 2013, 1:02 am
Signed
with 2,672 supporters
2,328 NEEDED
 

Past Member (0)
Wednesday July 3, 2013, 11:07 pm
Signed
 

Rose NoFWDSPLZ (276)
Thursday July 4, 2013, 4:14 pm
Signed
 

. (0)
Monday July 15, 2013, 3:48 pm
Signed and Noted.
 
Or, log in with your
Facebook account:
Please add your comment: (plain text only please. Allowable HTML: <a>)

Track Comments: Notify me with a personal message when other people comment on this story


Loading Noted By...Please Wait

 

 
Content and comments expressed here are the opinions of Care2 users and not necessarily that of Care2.com or its affiliates.