5 Fiery Resignations From the Trump Administration

It’s been less than three months since President Donald Trump was inaugurated, but there have already been plenty of resignations. Under Trump, longtime federal government employees have quickly found their jobs are now impossible and/or meaningless.

While some have left their positions quietly, some have penned some damning public letters to the commander-in-chief, explaining their reasons for leaving. These letters paint a frightening picture of what’s going on behind-the-scenes at the White House.

1. EPA Staffer

Michael Cox had been with the Environmental Protection Agency for 25 years when he decided he could no longer do his job under Trump. No, it’s not a “Republican” thing: he’s worked under six administrations, four of which were the GOP. However, the antagonism coming from the Trump administration has left the morale within the EPA worse than he’s ever seen it.

It’s no secret that Trump and his cronies have made a mockery of the work the EPA does. By dismantling an agency that does important work like keeping our air and water clean and tackling climate change, the Trump team is putting the future of the planet at significant risk. No wonder morale is so low.

“Criticizing the organization you lead is not the type of leadership that will produce results,” said Cox. “As a leader, you need to motivate and inspire your staff.”

“Do you really want your legacy to be the person who led the rollback and reversal of the amazing gains we have made over the past 40 years? I understand the challenges you face when going up against ideologues that appear to cherish fulfilling campaign promises more than doing the analysis and evaluation of what makes sense. But, we are counting on you to advocate for EPA. Unfortunately, up to this point, we have no evidence of this.”

2. Senior Advisor to the Deputy National Security Advisor for Strategic Communications

Rumana Ahmed, a Muslim woman who worked for the National Security Council, admits that she was worried about a possible Trump administration given his xenophobic rhetoric during the campaign, but ultimately she decided to stay on the job to serve her country and give Trump staffers a more “nuanced view of Islam.”

As she laments, though, she only lasted eight days. The last straw for her was when Trump implemented the Muslim travel ban. At that point, she felt the administration she now served viewed her not as a colleague “but as a threat.”

“The days I spent in the Trump White House were strange, appalling and disturbing. As one staffer serving since the Reagan administration said, ‘This place has been turned upside down. It’s chaos. I’ve never witnessed anything like it.’ This was not typical Republican leadership, or even that of a businessman. It was a chaotic attempt at authoritarianism,” Ahmed wrote for the Atlantic.

“The entire presidential support structure of nonpartisan national security and legal experts within the White House complex and across federal agencies was being undermined. Decision-making authority was now centralized to a few in the West Wing. Frustration and mistrust developed as some staff felt out of the loop on issues within their purview.”

That sure doesn’t make me feel any safer.

3. The President’s Advisory Commission on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders

In this instance, it’s not just one person who resigned: 10 members of the President’s Advisory Commission on AAPIs quit simultaneously, leaving the commission without nearly two-thirds of its positions unfilled.

The group had a lot of objections to Trump’s agenda in his first weeks in office, such as refugee bans, travel restrictions and suggested financial punishments for sanctuary cities. Their initial plan was to try to work with the president until they determined Trump had no interest in doing so.

“We object to your portrayal of immigrants, refugees, people of color and people of various faiths as untrustworthy, threatening and a drain on our nation,” said the ten members in an open letter. “The fact is that Native Peoples, immigrants from all parts of the world and people of color have built this country.”

Prior to making the decision to abandon their posts, the commission reached out to the president to request a meeting in order to discuss issues facing the Asian American and Pacific Islander community. The Trump team declined to answer this straightforward request, and also subsequently declined to comment to the press when the commission resigned en masse.

4. U.S. Attorney

Zach Fardon didn’t necessarily leave his job willingly – he was a casualty of Attorney General Jeff Session’s move to clean house and dump about four dozen federal prosecutors appointed by Barack Obama all at once. At the request of Sessions, Fardon offered up a resignation letter that put Trump’s bluster about sending the National Guard to Chicago on blast.

“What would a National Guard presence say to folks in those neighborhoods? This is a war, and you are the enemy. The Chicago of bike paths and glistening lakefront and economic opportunity – that’s not your Chicago, it’s ours and we will protect it. This is not a war. Wars are fought between enemies,” wrote Fardon.

Fardon is the kind of voice the Trump administration should listen to when it comes to Chicago – he’s worked in the city’s prosecutor’s office since the ‘90s.

Perhaps the most fascinating thing is that Fardon’s five-page letter is not full of criticisms. In fact, many of the views he expresses correlate strongly with those of the Trump administration. Perhaps if the Trump administration weren’t so hell-bent on eliminating Obama’s legacy in every way possible, the team would have discovered that a centrist like Fardon would be the ideal person to work with.

5. CIA Analyst

Edward Price figured he’d never leave his job at the CIA – where he worked for over a decade – since he loved studying intelligence and presenting it to the president to improve the world. However, under Trump, he quickly found he couldn’t do his job properly.

Price admits that he had disagreements with both Bush and Obama while serving under them, but that never discouraged him from doing his job. “As intelligence professionals, we’re taught to tune out politics,” Price wrote in a piece he wrote for the Washington Post. “But this administration has flipped that dynamic on its head: The politicians are the ones tuning out the intelligence professionals.”

Despite leaving his position, Price has hope that the CIA will ultimately prevail, though it will take a deliberate effort by the Trump team to mend the relationship with the agency. So far, Trump has been openly hostile to the CIA and intelligence community, which seems like a poor decision from a leadership standpoint.

Photo credit: Thinkstock

83 comments

Marie W
Marie W9 months ago

Thanks for sharing.

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ERIKA S
ERIKA Sabout a year ago

noted

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ERIKA S
ERIKA Sabout a year ago

noted

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Jennifer H
Jennifer Habout a year ago

Rump was probably thankful for the resignations since it saves him paperwork for firing totally competent personnel. He doesn't want any of that happening during his administration.

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Margie F
Margie FOURIEabout a year ago

Okay.

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Philippa P
Philippa Powersabout a year ago

Thanks.

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ERIKA S
ERIKA Sabout a year ago

noted

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ERIKA S
ERIKA Sabout a year ago

noted

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Patricia H
Patricia Harrisabout a year ago

pam w, are you kidding?? I'd criticize this moron all the way to the bank if I'd had to!

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ERIKA S
ERIKA Sabout a year ago

noted

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