5 Groups Pushing Inclusive Pronouns

OKCupid just became the first mainstream (and non-LGBTQ-specific) dating site to offer gender-inclusive pronouns for daters to describe themselves.

The popular dating website has long pioneered inclusive language for its users. In 2014, OKCupid introduced options for gender identity beyond male and female, as well as a wider selection of sexual orientation options than gay, straight and bisexual. It also lets LGBTQ users block straight people from viewing their profile and offers a range of alternative relationship structures to choose from, including the option to say someone’s “in an open relationship.”

Now the site offers a place for daters to include their pronouns on their profiles. Hopefully other dating apps will follow suit.

Here are 4 other companies that have done the same in a push for inclusion of non-binary folks.

HSBC

Last year, British bank HSBC expanded their options for honorifics beyond Mr., Ms., Mrs. and Dr. to include other non-gender titles such as Mx, M and Myr. Customers can also change their names on their accounts more easily than in the past if they bring in documents to prove they are who they say they are.

LGBTQ advocacy group Stonewall listed the bank as one of their Top 100 Employers in Britain for their inclusion last year.

The University of Texas at Austin

This fall, many University of Texas students saw a new change: Their course paperwork will likely have a space to include the pronouns they use. The section isn’t required, but the university put the addition on the syllabus master template.

“It’s anxiety-inducing to just be a trans or nonbinary person, and it can be anxiety-inducing to approach someone like a professor or a faculty member that you perceive as being higher up in the social hierarchy than you and address something like pronoun usage,” Dallon Freeman, a nonbinary student, tells The Daily Texan. “So having something like an outlined syllabus policy, or even just a mention of it at all, I think that’s something that can bring a lot of comfort to the gender diverse population at UT.”

Clue

While menstruation is a part of many women’s lives, not all people who bleed are women and not all women bleed. The period tracker startup Clue has tried to capture these nuances with inclusive language.

While they aren’t quite there—they still use the phrase “female health” rather than the more gender-neutral “reproductive health”—they’re deliberate about using words like “people” rather than women to describe their target audience. They want to make health information accessible to all.

American Copy Editors Society

The major authority on grammar added the singular “they” to its stylebook last year.

“We stress that it’s usually possible to write around that,” Paula Froke, lead editor for the Associated Press Stylebook, said in a post for the American Copy Editors Society. “But we offer new advice for two reasons: recognition that the spoken language uses they as singular and we also recognize the need for a pronoun for people who don’t identify as a he or a she.”

 

Photo Credit: Ted Eytan

42 comments

Mia B
Melisa B5 months ago

thanks for sharing

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Rose Becke
Rose Becke5 months ago

Thanks

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Caitlin L
Past Member 5 months ago

thank you for sharing

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Daniel N
Past Member 6 months ago

thanks for sharing

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Tania N
Tania N6 months ago

Thank you for sharing.

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Tania N
Tania N6 months ago

Thank you for sharing.

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Caitlin L
Past Member 6 months ago

thank you

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Len W
Len W6 months ago

To keep it short, instead of the whole mouthful of LGBTIQ+ ect think of a shorter version meaning the same . Alternative sexual people/person or ASP. Gay had a different meaning a few years ago but is now used to signify a group of people.

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Tania N
Tania N6 months ago

Thanks for sharing

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Tania N
Tania N6 months ago

Thanks for sharing

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