Fashion Giants Dump Mohair After Graphic PETA Video Exposes Goat Abuse

Heartbreaking new undercover video from PETA has convinced several major international clothing retailers to drop mohair from their product lines.

H&M, Gap, Inc. (owner of Banana Republic, Athleta and Old Navy), Inditex (which owns Zara) and Arcadia Group (owner of Topshop) have all announced they will ban mohair from their product lines.

Mohair is a silky, resilient luxury fabric popular for coats, sweaters and scarves. It is made from the long, soft hair of Angora goats. Mohair is sometimes called the “diamond fiber” because of its luster and strength.

The problem, of course, is how the goats are treated. In January and February 2018, PETA Asia captured footage from the 12 Angora goat farms in South Africa that provide more than half of the world’s mohair. What they documented is horrifying.

If you want to see the evidence for yourself, this is the footage that convinced the retailers to react. Be advised, it’s graphic:

PETA captured video showing:

  • Workers dragging goats around haphazardly by the horns and legs
  • Goats crying in fear as they are shorn
  • Workers lifting goats by their tails, which can break their spines
  • Workers throwing goats across the floor after shearing them
  • Workers apparently shearing dead goats
  • One worker admitting on video that thousands of goats — 40,000, in fact — died of exposure after being left outside in the cold after being shorn

“At one farm, a worker slowly cut the throats of fully conscious goats with a dull knife and then broke their necks, hacking one animal’s head right off,” said PETA in a press release. “Other goats were hauled to a slaughterhouse, where they were electrically shocked, hung upside down, and slashed across the throat.”

A PETA investigator also reported seeing workers mutilating many goats’ ears with pliers, leaving them screaming in pain.

The shearing is done with huge scissors, which workers wield quickly and carelessly. This practice, naturally, results in painful injuries to the goats. Workers are paid by volume, so speed is crucial to their profit. That doesn’t leave much room for care and kindness to the poor goats.

Terrified goat being shorn.  Photo credit: PETA

Terrified goat being shorn. Photo credit: PETA

“The most effective way to prevent goats from suffering and dying in the ways we’ve seen is by going directly to retailers and consumers,” Dan Paden, director of evidence analysis at PETA, told The Washington Post.

“What’s ultimately going to keep more goats from going through this is when retailers pull their support for the industry, and informed consumers leave the mohair products on the shelves and buy something else that doesn’t have as much cruelty woven into it,” Paden added.

PETA is seeking action from South African law enforcement. They want authorities to investigate and charge farms that are violating South Africa’s 1962 Animals Protection Act. But what can you do?

Keep these sweet goats in mind when you see mohair clothing in stores. Don’t buy these products, and don’t accept them as gifts.

If enough consumers turn away from animal products, they become unprofitable to produce. It’s folly to believe that clothing retailers now shun mohair because they’re horrified by PETA’s video. Rather, they understand that their customers are horrified.

Remember this fact, activists. Use your power as a consumer to the animals’ advantage. Tell companies when you object to products that use and abuse animals. These beautiful and unique goats need our help.

Photo Credit: Ryan Somma/Flickr

107 comments

Chrissie R
Chrissie R4 days ago

Bravo!!! Thanks for posting.

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natasha p
Past Member 24 days ago

yes!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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ANA MARIJA R
ANA MARIJA Rabout a month ago

well said, Loredana V

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Michael Friedmann
Michael Friedmannabout a month ago

Thank You for Sharing This !!!

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Julie D
Julie Dabout a month ago

I can't watch the video, these types of video's haunt my soul forever once I have seen them. I'm glad some designers will not use mohair but it won't stop the problem altogether. There must be a way of harvesting the wool in a much more humane way, and those people who breed these animals need to be closely monitored and heavily fined for any infraction. To abuse and injure these poor creatures is unconscionable and unnecessary. I am allergic to wool and angora, so I have never been a buyer. Somehow we have to change the concept so rampant in human minds that animals are here for our use and abuse. We are supposed to be good shepherds of the animals, which would mean keeping them from harm, not committing these atrocities on them. It breaks my heart to think of any creature having to suffer so.

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Mark Donner
Mark Donnerabout a month ago

South Africans were supposedly "liberated" from a harsh regime, but they are worse than the apartheid they replaced with some of the worst crime rates in Africa. Corruption infests the place. Canned hunting, poaching and these kind of atrocities should have been stopped by their pathetic government a long time ago but the government of South Africa is a nest of criminals who get kickbacks from these crimes.

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Colin C
Colin Cabout a month ago

Poor goats great fashion labels are banning mohair.

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Michael Friedmann
Michael Friedmannabout a month ago

Thank You for Sharing This !!!

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Clare O
Clare O'Bearaabout a month ago

Thanks Peta for exposing the cruelty. Buy wool for craftwork or wool clothing from reputable sources. Not fashion houses, which over the years have demonstrated they are only out to make fast money.

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Clare O
Clare O'Bearaabout a month ago

Notice this is happening in Africa. from what we see regularly, Africans often do not think of animals as anything but meat running around, sometimes with added value like tusks or wool.

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