Get Counted: How to Vote Absentee in Your State

If you’re eligible to vote in this November’s election, you need to get on it. Every vote counts in a year when everything we know about elections seems to be upside down. Maybe you love showing up in person to cast your vote, but if you can’t make the polls, you can still vote absentee. Some states even allow individuals to vote by mail without providing a reason.

Below, you’ll find the basics for enrollment as an absentee voter, making participation in this year’s election a snap –no matter where you are.

Before we begin, two questions:

Are you registered to vote?

If not, you’ll find information about deadlines below. If you’re not sure, or if you haven’t voted recently, check your registration here. Be aware that clerks regularly perform “purges” to remove deceased and inactive voters from the rolls, and sometimes actual voters get caught up — not always by accident. Even if you think you’re registered, it just takes a second to confirm! Clerks and registrars often require voters to register before they can issue absentee ballots and may not allow people to register and request an absentee ballot simultaneously.

Do you live overseas or serve in the military?

The rules for voting overseas are a whole different ballgame, but you can begin with the Federal Voting Assistance Program. Start now, because the process can become complicated, and overseas mail tends to be slow! Do not use the directions below for voting absentee if you are overseas or in the military. Many counties and parishes have a different process for these voters.

Some quick tips:

1. You can confirm that your absentee ballot was received and counted in several ways, depending on where you live. Your county clerk’s office may maintain a website where you can enter your personal information or ballot stub number to track your ballot. You can also call for that information.

2. Disabled voters who have trouble filling out a ballot on their own may be assisted with absentee ballots or in the polling booth, but they must sign or make a mark indicating that this is, in fact, their ballot. The same applies to illiterate voters. In some states, an “absentee voting board” may need to oversee absentee voters who need assistance to ensure they aren’t coerced. Policies can vary, and if this is a concern, ask your county clerk or registrar for specific details.

3. If you mess up, you can request a replacement ballot. You usually need to enclose your absentee ballot in the mailing envelope. Instead of signing it, fill out the slip indicating that it’s spoiled and you would like a new one. You may also be able to bring it to your county elections office for a replacement, depending on your state’s policies.

What You Need to Know State-by-State

Find your state below to get information on voter registration deadlines and absentee voting. Be aware that, depending on your state, individual county clerks may have the power to set deadlines and other policies. If you think you will vote absentee, call ahead to make sure you don’t miss a key deadline.

Idaho Missouri Pennsylvania
Alabama Illinois Montana Rhode Island
Alaska Indiana Nebraska South Carolina
Arizona Iowa Nevada South Dakota
Arkansas Kansas New Hampshire Tennessee
California Kentucky New Jersey Texas
Colorado Louisiana New Mexico Utah
Connecticut Maine New York Vermont
Delaware Maryland North Carolina Virginia
District of Columbia Massachusetts North Dakota Washington
Florida Michigan Ohio West Virginia
Georgia Minnesota Oklahoma Wisconsin
Hawaii Mississippi Oregon Wyoming
Soldiers making calls during a voter information drive.

Soldiers can be part of get out the vote efforts too! Photo credit: U.S. Army

Alabama

Your voter registration must be postmarked by Oct. 24.

To qualify for an absentee ballot, you must be disabled, out of the area on Election Day, working a 10-hour shift that overlaps with polling hours, serving as a poll worker at a location other than your designated polling place or living overseas for military service or other reasons. Alabama does not offer permanent absentee status, so you must apply for each election.

Go here to get the paperwork and information for requesting an absentee ballot in Alabama. This must be completed no later than five days prior to the election. Your application needs to be mailed or handed to the Absentee Election Manager in your county, and it must be returned the same way. The paperwork can be hand-delivered until 5 p.m. on Election Day, while mailed ballots should arrive by noon. Your ballot must include a notarization or two witness signatures, as well as a copy of your identification.

Alaska

Your voter registration must be received by Oct. 9.

Alaska has a “no excuse” absentee voting system, allowing any registered voter to apply for a vote-by-mail ballot. You may even qualify for permanent absentee status in some situations. If you aren’t registered yet, you can register and apply at the same time. For city and borough elections, you will need to apply directly to your clerk for a ballot. Your ballot must be received by the time polls close on Election Day. If you can’t get it in the mail in time, contact your closest voting location to see if they can accept your ballot.

Arizona

Your voter registration must be received by Oct. 10.

Arizona is a “no excuse” absentee voting state, allowing individuals to request absentee ballots without having to provide documentation to justify it. You can register as a permanent absentee at the same time. Requests for absentee ballots are due 11 days before the election, and your ballot must be returned on Election Day — either by mail to your elections official or in person to any polling location within your county.

Arkansas

Your voter registration must be postmarked by Oct. 10.

Arkansas voters are allowed to request an absentee ballot on a per election basis only and must be able to demonstrate that they will be unable to get to the polls on Election Day. You can pick up your ballot at the county clerk’s office, designate a bearer to pick up and drop off the ballot or request a ballot by mail.

Completed ballots must be returned to the county clerk; when returning a ballot personally, it is due the day before Election Day. If the ballot is being dropped off by mail or via your bearer, it must be submitted by 7:30 p.m. on Election Day.

California

Your voter registration must be postmarked or directly submitted to an election office by Oct. 24.

Any California voter can request an absentee ballot or apply for permanent absentee status, and there are a couple of ways to do it. You can use the form on the back of your voter information pamphlet — make sure it arrives at least seven days before the election — or send in an application. Some counties let you order a ballot over the phone — you can check with your county clerk.

Make sure your ballot is postmarked on or before Election Day. If you can’t get to the post office, you can deliver your ballot to your county elections official or any polling place up until closing time on Election Day. You can also designate a bearer to return your ballot.

Colorado

Your voter registration must be postmarked by Oct. 17 if submitted through a voter registration drive, but all voters can register up to — and including — Election Day.

Colorado is a vote-by-mail state: Lucky you, you’re voting absentee whether you like it or not!

Connecticut

Your voter registration must be postmarked by Nov. 1, but you can also register in person on Election Day.

Connecticut requires voters to furnish an excuse for an absentee ballot. Some acceptable reasons include: a physical impairment that makes it difficult or impossible to get to the polls; religious restrictions; being in the armed forces overseas; being out of town on Election Day; and working as an election official at a polling place that isn’t your own. You must apply on a per-election basis — unless you are disabled, in which case you may qualify for permanent vote-by-mail status.

The Connecticut Secretary of State provides application forms for absentee ballots, emergency — short notice — ballots and ballots for referendums with less than three week’s notice. Your ballot must arrive before the polls close on Election Day, either by mail or personal delivery to your town clerk.

Delaware

Your voter registration must be postmarked by Oct. 15.

Delaware voters who meet the state’s criteria can request a ballot on a per-election basis. To qualify, you need to be able to demonstrate evidence of: a disability; religious beliefs that conflict with going to the polls; overseas military service; a job that makes it impossible to get to the polls; travel plans; or a government job that precludes going to the polls — including being a poll worker in a different precinct than your own.

You will have to fill out an affidavit to request your ballot. You can return the document by mail or in person at your county’s Department of Elections — call ahead to find out when voting hours are scheduled. Certain individuals, such as people with permanent disabilities, may qualify for permanent absentee status.

District of Columbia

Your voter registration must be postmarked by Oct. 11, but you can also register in person on Election Day.

You have until November 1 to apply for an absentee ballot in D.C., and you can apply online! You do not need to furnish an explanation, but if you haven’t voted before, you will be asked for a photo ID or a utility bill with your address to prove your identity and residency. Make sure your ballot is mailed in time to arrive before the polls close. If you are in the military, you may be eligible to vote via fax or email.

Florida

Your voter registration must be postmarked by Oct. 11.

Any Florida voter can apply to vote by mail, online, in person or by phone. You must provide your name, address and date of birth to elections officials. The ballot can be mailed out or picked up from a County Supervisor of Elections and it may be returned via either method as well. Voters can also designate bearers to pick up and drop off their ballots for them. If it’s Election Day, Florida requires an additional form explaining why a voter cannot go to the polls to vote.

If you change your mind and want to go to the polling place to vote, you must bring your ballot with you. If you never received it or can’t find it, you may cast a provisional ballot.

A sign pointing towards a polling booth.

Photo credit: Justin Grimes

Georgia

Your voter registration must be postmarked by Oct. 11.

Depending on your county, you may be able to mail, fax, email, hand-deliver or apply online for your personal request for an absentee ballot. No excuse is required, but you need to file a new form for every election, except in some special cases — for example if you can’t leave your home or you’re living overseas. Make sure to mail it off in plenty of time to arrive by Election Day, or return it personally to the Voter Registration and Elections Division in your county. If you’re disabled, an adult relative or any adult who lives at your house, like a personal assistant, can return the ballot for you.

Hawaii

Your voter registration must be received by Oct. 10.

Any Hawaiian voter can vote early or request a mail ballot, and it’s possible to apply for permanent absentee status as well. The application must be received by November 1 for this year’s election, and you must return your ballot to your county clerk by mail or personally before the polls close on Election Day.

Idaho

Your voter registration must be postmarked by Oct. 14, but you can also register in person on Election Day.

Idaho residents can mail or fax a request for an absentee ballot to their county clerk’s office. They don’t have to provide an excuse, but they must apply with every election. Absentee ballots must be returned by the time polls close on Election Day.

Illinois

Your voter registration must be postmarked by Oct. 11, but you can also register in person on Election Day.

Illinois residents can submit a request for a vote by mail ballot to the election authority, and no excuse is required. The ballot can be mailed or physically returned to an election authority. Voters who change their minds and decide they want to vote at the polls instead need to bring their absentee ballot with them. Alternatively, they may choose to sign an affidavit saying they never received the ballot or sent it but never received confirmation that it arrived.

Indiana

Your voter registration must be postmarked by Oct. 11.

Indiana requires voters to submit an excuse in order to obtain an absentee ballot, such as evidence that they are living, working or serving overseas or have a disability that makes it difficult or impossible to reach the polls. Voters must submit their absentee voting application by October 31 and must mail their ballots back in time for them to arrive on or before Election Day. You may also hand-deliver to the county election board through Election Day.

Anyone may vote on an absentee ballot in person at a county election board office — call ahead for hours — after October 12.

Iowa

Your voter registration must be postmarked by Oct. 29, but you can also register in person on Election Day.

Anyone can request an absentee ballot in Iowa, and will need to fill out the form and return it to their county auditor until the Friday before the election. You must mail or hand deliver your ballot to the county auditor by the time polls close. If you change your mind and want to go to the polling place, you will need to surrender your ballot — whether you voted on it or not — or vote provisionally if your ballot isn’t available.

Kansas

Your voter registration must be postmarked or personally delivered by Oct. 14.

Any Kansas voter may request an advance voting ballot from their county elections officer. Your ballot needs to be sent to the county elections office before the polls close on Election Day, whether you mail it or hand deliver it. Depending on your county, you can also vote early in person between seven and 20 days before the election.

Kentucky

Your voter registration must be postmarked by Oct. 11.

Kentucky voters must demonstrate that they are unable to go to the polls on Election Day for reasons like illness, disability, work, military service or overseas residence in order to quality for an absentee ballot, which they must request from their county clerk. The ballot must be returned by mail or in person to the county clerk.

If you change your mind and want to go to the polls, you need to surrender your ballot to the county clerk’s office, but you must do so at least seven days before the election. If you qualify for an absentee ballot, you may also be eligible to vote early in person at the county clerk’s office.

Louisiana

Your voter registration must be received by Oct. 11.

You can request an absentee ballot online or through your parish registrar of voters up to four days before Election Day. To be eligible for an absentee ballot, you must provide an explanation for why you cannot go to the polls. If you’re disabled or an older adult, you may qualify for the “disability program,” which provides mail ballots or assisted voting facilitated by a county official for life. Your ballot must be returned before the polls close, either by mail or by hand, to your registrar of voters.

Maine

Your voter registration must be received by Oct. 18, but you can also register in person on Election Day.

Anyone in Maine may apply for an absentee ballot and has until three business days before the election to do so. The ballot must be returned to the municipal clerk’s office before polls close, but you also have the option of absentee voting in person for the month preceding the election –in which case you do not need to file a request form.

A poster advertising the 2012 presidential election.

Photo credit: Rob Stinnett

Maryland

Your voter registration must be postmarked by Oct. 18.

Any Maryland voter can request an absentee ballot online or through their local board of elections, and ballots may be mailed or hand-delivered to the local board of elections office. Maryland also allows individuals to vote absentee in person at a board of elections office if they know they cannot get to the polls on Election Day. Maryland does not have a permanent absentee program, so you need to request an absentee ballot every time.

Massachusetts

Your voter registration must be postmarked by Oct. 19.

Massachusetts voters must submit a written request to their city or town clerk or the election commission. They are required to provide an excuse for not being able to vote in person, such as overseas travel, work conflicts or disability. Ballots can be returned via mail or by hand to your elections official.

Michigan

Your voter registration must be postmarked by Oct. 11.

Michigan voters who are unable to visit the polls in person due to factors like overseas employment, disability or fundamental work conflicts can request an absentee ballot from their city or township clerk. You have until the polls close on Election Day to vote and return your ballot to the clerk, either by mail or in person.

Minnesota

Your voter registration must be received by Oct. 18, but you can also register in person on Election Day with proof of residency. Anyone can ask for an absentee ballot in Minnesota — and if you aren’t registered to vote, you can do that at the same time. The state has a handy online portal to make it easy, though you are required to apply for every single election — unless you have a permanent disability that keeps you away from the polls.

If you’re not feeling the internet, there’s a paper application too. Your ballot must be returned in person or by mail to your county election office before the polls close. If something goes wrong, call to request a replacement ballot or ask to cancel your ballot so you can vote in person at the polls or your county elections office.

Mississippi

Your voter registration must be postmarked by Oct. 8.

Mississippi residents are only eligible for absentee voting if they can provide an excuse — such as travel, disability or a conflicting work schedule. They can request a form from a circuit or municipal clerk to fill out for a given election. Ballots must be returned by mail or by hand before polls close on Election Day.

Missouri

Your voter registration must be received by Oct. 12.

Residents of Missouri may request an absentee ballot if they know they will be unable to attend the polls in person on Election Day and have until the Wednesday before the election to do so. Ballots must be returned to the same local election authority on or before Election Day, either by hand or by mail. Voters who are disabled may request to be added to the permanent absentee list.

Montana

Your voter registration must be postmarked by Oct. 11, but you can also register in person at the county clerk’s office up to and including Election Day.

Any Montana voter is allowed to request an absentee ballot from a local election office. The request may be mailed or dropped off personally, so the ballot can be delivered via either method prior to the close of the polls on Election Day.

Montana also accepts absentee ballot drop-offs at polling sites, and voters are not required to wait in line when they are delivering absentee ballots. Voters can indicate which elections they would like to receive absentee ballots for and can ask to be placed on the absentee list, with grants permanent absentee status.

Nebraska

Your voter registration must be postmarked by Oct. 21.

All Nebraska voters may submit absentee ballot requests to their county clerks or election commissioners, either in person or by mail. Ballots must be returned before the polls close on Election Day, either by mail or by hand.

Nevada

Your voter registration must be postmarked by Oct. 8, but you can file online up to Oct. 18.

No excuse is required to vote absentee in Nevada, where anyone can request an absentee ballot from a county clerk or registrar of voters. Ballots must be returned to an election department before the polls close on Election Day, either by mail or by hand. If you change your mind on Election Day, you can surrender your ballot at the polls and vote there instead. If your ballot is not available — for example, if it never arrived — you will need to cast a provisional ballot.

New Hampshire

Your voter registration must be received by Oct. 29, but you can also register in person on Election Day.

New Hampshire voters who want to vote absentee must provide a reason for doing so, as the state requires individuals to vote in person at the polls unless there’s a compelling reason otherwise. Applicants can fill out a request for absentee ballot and mail, fax or hand-deliver it to their town or city clerk.

Ballots must be returned by mail or by hand to the clerk’s office by 5 p.m. on Election Day. If delivered by hand, ballots must be handed personally to the clerk — if a ballot is dropped off under the door, there’s a chance it might not get there in time.

New Jersey

Your voter registration must be received by Oct. 18.

Any New Jersey resident may request a vote by mail ballot from the county clerk, though the request must arrive by mail at least seven days before the election. Voters may also go directly to the county clerk’s office up to 3 p.m. on the day before the election. The ballot must be returned to the county clerk, either by mail or by hand.

New Mexico

Your voter registration must be postmarked by Oct. 11.

New Mexico voters can request an absentee ballot by mail, phone or in person. Beginning 28 days prior to the election, voters can also arrange to vote absentee in person at a county clerk’s office — call ahead to ensure the office will be open when you plan to go. Your ballot must be returned by mail or in person by the Friday prior to the election.

If you don’t receive a ballot, you can request a new one at the county clerk’s office or the polls. You will need to sign a document indicating that you didn’t receive or vote on the original ballot.

New York

Your voter registration must be postmarked by Oct. 14 and received by Oct. 19.

If you are unable to go to the polls in person due to travel, illness or certain other factors, you are eligible to request an absentee ballot. Your ballot must be returned by mail to the county board of elections at least seven days before the election or in person by the day before. Disabled voters may apply for permanent absentee status, but all other voters will need to apply individually for each election.

North Carolina

Your voter registration must be received by Oct. 14.

Any voter may contact the State Board of Elections or a local elections office to request an absentee ballot. Along with the ballot itself, voters will need to return a witness form signed by a single notary public or two witnesses who can testify that the ballot was completed by the named party and without coercion. The ballot must arrive by 5 p.m. on Election Day, whether by mail or by hand. Election officials at one-stop voting sites can also accept absentee ballots.

North Dakota

No voter registration is required, but you will need identification and proof of residency.

The North Dakota Secretary of State maintains a fast online request form for absentee ballots for the convenience of voters. Your ballot must be mailed by the day before the election or may be returned by hand.

Ohio

Your voter registration must be received by Oct. 11.

Ohio voters can take advantage of an online form to request an absentee ballot. They have the option of voting absentee in person at various locations – a county board of elections will have full details – or voting entirely by mail.

The ballot must arrive at your county clerk’s office by 7:30 p.m. on Election Day, whether by mail or by hand. If you change your mind and decide to vote at the polls, you will be asked to cast a provisional ballot.

Oklahoma

Your voter registration must be postmarked by Oct. 14.

Voters may apply online for an absentee ballot for one election or all elections in a given calendar year. A notarized witness form is required for the ballot to be accepted, and it should be returned by mail to the county election board before 7 p.m. on Election Day.

Oregon

Your voter registration must be postmarked by Oct. 18.

Oregon is a vote-by-mail state, so you’ll receive a ballot in the mail whether you ask for it or not! If you don’t, contact your county clerk to find out what went wrong.

Pennsylvania

Your voter registration must be received by Oct. 11.

If you will be absent on Election Day, or you have an illness or disability that precludes getting to the polls, you can vote by mail in Pennsylvania using this ballot request form. Your ballot must arrive at the county board of elections office prior to 5 p.m. on the Friday before the election by mail or in person — but only the voter may return a ballot in person.

The state also requires people who are able to go to the polls — for instance, if their travel plans change or their health improves – to vote in person on Election Day by voiding their absentee ballots and requesting a new ballot at their polling places.

Rhode Island

Your voter registration must be received by Oct. 9.

Rhode Island allows voters who are unable to get to the polls to request an absentee ballot, which must be returned to the State Board of Elections by 8 p.m. on Election Day. Like a growing number of states, Rhode Island also allows people who “may not be able” to vote in person to request a ballot without providing an excuse.

South Carolina

Your voter registration must be postmarked by Oct. 8.

Voters who can provide an excuse to explain their absence at the polls may contact their county voter registration office to request an absentee ballot or use this online tool. Your ballot must be signed and witnessed in order to be counted.

Voters must return their ballots by 7 p.m. on Election Day, either in person or via the mail. If they want to use authorized agents, they will need to fill out an additional form designating a ballot bearer.

An absentee ballot with British postage.

Photo credit: Jeff Knezovich

South Dakota

Your voter registration must be received by Oct. 24.

Voters who can’t make it to the polls can request an absentee ballot from the county auditor and return it by mail or in person. In-person absentee voting is also an option. Voters will need to furnish a copy of acceptable ID or a notarization with their request to confirm their identity. If necessary, you can designate an authorized messenger to collect and return your ballot for you.

Tennessee

Your voter registration must be postmarked by Oct. 11.

Any Tennessee voter can participate in early voting without having to furnish an excuse, but individuals who want to vote by mail will need to demonstrate why they cannot get to the polls. Disabled voters may apply for permanent absentee status.

Early voting opens 20 days prior to Election Day and closes five days before, except in certain circumstances — like municipal races with no opposition. Ballots must be returned by mail by 5 p.m. on Election Day. Once a ballot has been mailed, voters cannot change their minds and go to the polls instead.

Tennessee does not allow voters to hand deliver their ballots, so plan ahead!

Texas

Your voter registration must be postmarked by Oct. 11.

Texas residents who are unable to go to the polls because of illness, disability, absence or confinement in jail may request an absentee ballot. Texas has extremely stringent requirements for voters, so it is advisable to ask for a ballot as soon as possible — up to 60 days before the election. You must return your ballot to the early voting clerk. All voters have the option of voting early in person, and those interested in doing so should contact their early voting clerk for information.

Utah

Your voter registration must be postmarked by Oct. 11 and be received by Oct. 24.

Any Utah voter can request an absentee ballot and ask to be added to the permanent absentee roll. Your ballot must be postmarked no later than the day before the election, and it’s a good idea to mail it a few days earlier. Some areas have exclusively vote-by-mail elections, in which case you may receive a mail ballot even if you are not registered as a permanent absentee.

Vermont

Your voter registration must be received by Nov. 2, but you can also register in person on Election Day.

All Vermont voters have the option of voting absentee or early and can easily request a ballot online. Your ballot must be received in the town clerk’s office by the day before the election, but you can also drop it off at the polls on Election Day.

If you have a health-related emergency, a ballot can be hand-delivered by county officials, who will also return it once completed, but you must request this service no later than 5 p.m. on the day before the election.

Virginia

Your voter registration must be received by Oct. 17.

Voters who are unable to vote on Election Day may request an absentee ballot. Virginia includes a provision for voters with last-minute emergencies or schedule changes that would keep them away from the polls. Your ballot must be returned to your local registrar by 7 p.m. on Election Day.

If you haven’t voted before in your precinct, you won’t be eligible to vote by mail — except for some specific cases for military and overseas voters. You can also vote absentee in person and should check with your local registrar to find out more about voting hours.

Washington

Your voter registration must be postmarked by Oct. 10 or delivered by hand by Oct. 31.

Washington is a vote-by-mail state, and all ballots are automatically sent out to voters.

West Virginia

Your voter registration must be postmarked by Oct. 18.

If you are unable to vote in person on Election Day, you can request an absentee ballot – but must do so at least six days before the election. Your ballot should be returned in person by the day before the election or by mail, postmarked no later than Election Day. If there’s a problem with your ballot, contact your county clerk as soon as possible to ensure you don’t miss voting deadlines.

In certain situations — for example, sudden illness – West Virginia voters can request an emergency absentee ballot. Disabled voters and individuals enrolled in the Address Confidentiality Program may apply for permanent absentee status.

Wisconsin

Your voter registration must be postmarked by Oct. 19, but you can also register in person on Election Day.

Wisconsin voters may request a ballot from their county clerk. If they do so in person, they will be required to vote, seal and deliver the ballot at the time of application, effectively voting early. Starting in November 2016, the ballot must be received by Election Day.

Wyoming

Your voter registration must be received by Oct. 24, but you can also register in person on Election Day.

Wyoming voters can request an absentee ballot at any time other than Election Day, and they do not need to furnish an excuse. They have the option of voting in person at a county clerk’s office within 40 days of the election or voting by mail, as long as ballots are received by Election Day. If a ballot doesn’t make it into the mail, it can be hand-delivered to the county clerk’s office on Election Day.

Photo credit: Tony Webster

60 comments

Marie W.
Marie W1 years ago

Thanks

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Teresa Antela
Teresa Antela1 years ago

Ty

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Wendi M.
Wendi M1 years ago

TYFS

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Janis K.
Janis K1 years ago

Thanks for sharing.

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Margie FOURIE
Margie FOURIE1 years ago

Thank you

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ERIKA SOMLAI
ERIKA S1 years ago

noted

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Ron A G.
Ron G1 years ago

It's just the way I am, but no mail ins for me. Less chance, I feel, that my vote gets lost and counted. Corruption is too rampant in politics. I cite California's last primary which never did get totally counted on the Democratic side, but Democrats are not unique when it comes to election manipulation. I applied and passed our county's exam to be an election judge. Wonder if I scared them?

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Debbi -.
Debbi -1 years ago

I would suggest mailing your absentee ballot by registered mail, especially if you live in areas known for 'losing' ballots and miscounting or any errors. Keep your receipt as proof in case there is any dispute about the votes counted. Yes, I'm suspicious but this year each vote is important and in areas where counting votes isn't always honest, you might need proof that you did vote.

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Ron B.
Ron B1 years ago

Even better yet, encourage your state to adopt vote-by-mail such as we have here in Oregon. Republican politicians in general tend to hate it since it makes stealing elections just that much harder for them.

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Anne Moran
Anne M1 years ago

Being Canadian,, I'll just keep my fingers crossed for Hilary... xo

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