Hate Killing of LGBTQ Americans Doubled in 2017

Despite the undeniable social progress that the LGBTQ Americans have attained in recent years, it’s premature to say the queer community is safe and sound. In fact, hate-fueled killings of LGBTQ people nearly doubled in the United States in 2017.

Specifically, the number of hate-based killings of LGBTQ people shot up by 86 percent from 2016, according to A Crisis of Hate: A Report on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer Hate Violence Homicides in 2017, a report prepared by the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP).

With 52 such homicides on the record, 2017 is now the deadliest year for LGBTQ people since these statistics have been compiled. Worse still, by the authors’ own admission, the report is undoubtedly incomplete because some homicide victims are not classified by the authorities as gay and trans people are often misgendered on police reports, meaning the body count is probably significantly higher.

There is an important caveat to the NCAVP’s work: the annual report has always counted single-victim homicides and not mass shootings. That’s why 2016’s report did not factor in the Pulse Nightclub tragedy, which would have skewed the number.

Overall, transgender women and gay men were the most likely to be victimized by killers. Racial minorities were especially likely to be targeted, with 71 percent of the total LGBTQ victims being people of color.

Beyond that, 67 percent of the victims were below the age of 36, and the majority were killed with guns.

Over half of these homicides occurred in just five states: New York, Texas, Georgia, Florida and Louisiana. Excluding New York, it’s clear that a lot of the anti-LGBT hostility is focused in the south.

Although the NCAVP has access to the numbers of the victims rather than the full motivations of the killers in these cases, the authors including executive director Beverly Tillery agree with many that the vitriol coming out of the Donald Trump administration has to play a factor.

“It was a tactical move to attack those communities,” Tillery told the Huffington Post. “It worked, and there are more instances of violence because the climate in the country has changed. It has given an opening for people to feel like they can commit acts of hate-based violence without much repercussion.

Trump has made it a point to insist that crime is at a record high, despite the general crime rate continually dropping. If he wants to continue to focus on crime, LGBTQ hate-homicides would be a good place to sound the alarm. Alas, Trump has demonstrated repeatedly that he’d rather cater to his homophobic base than actually help the LGBTQ community.

We can expect another report from NCAVP later in 2018 that compiles statistics on all violence against LGBT people, not just the homicides. Tillery was willing to preview that, unfortunately, those numbers have also risen in 2017.

Photo credit: Thinkstock

63 comments

Marie W
Marie W3 months ago

Thanks for sharing.

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Jack Y
Jack Y7 months ago

thanks

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Jack Y
Jack Y7 months ago

thanks

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John J
John J7 months ago

thanks for sharing

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John J
John J7 months ago

thanks for sharing

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John B
John B8 months ago

Thanks for sharing.

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Chrissie R
Chrissie R9 months ago

Thank you for posting.

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Deborah W
Deborah W9 months ago

KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK ... highlighting our differences rather than presenting our sameness desire for love, acceptance,, respect, recognition of talent rather than the negatives, which we also ALL experience: pain, rejection, loneliness, worthlessness, etc. If that your plan, it seems to be working -- for now.

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Karen B
Karen B9 months ago

How sad.....

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pam w
pam w9 months ago

Heartbreaking! Say...has anyone heard any evangelicals speaking out against this? Has anyone heard evangelicals speak of embracing the LGBT community? Right..I thought not. So very Jesusish of them.

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