Maryland Research Animals Will Get Adopted – Let’s Make It a National Law

Finally, there’s some relief for dogs used in scientific research in the state of Maryland. Thanks to a bill passed by state legislatures, facilities that use animals in their tests must now make a good faith effort to find these animals homes afterwards rather than resorting to euthanasia.

So long as a veterinarian determines that any dog or cat used in an experiment is healthy enough to be adopted, researchers will be obligated to help find their former subjects a home so the latter part of their lives are much more enjoyable than their time spent in a laboratory.

It’s exciting news for the 100,000+ Care2 community members who signed this Care2 petition encouraging the Maryland General Assembly to get the bill passed. Now we’re looking to make this apply throughout the country by petitioning the U.S. Congress to pass similar legislation at the federal level.

Obviously, it’d be far better if animals were not used as test subjects altogether, but until laws mandating animal research for certain products are repealed, it’s worth our collective efforts to give these poor animals a second shot at a happy life.

In the past couple of years, Maryland legislators have considered similar bills with no success. The big difference this time around is that John Hopkins Medicine, which had opposed previous iterations of the bill, finally got behind the concept now that researchers can set up their own adoption systems and arrangements without having to do it through the state.

Ultimately, it’ll be up to the facilities to determine whether they will create their own direct adoption system or team with existing animal shelters to have them find these animals loving homes.

The legislation Maryland passed has been nicknamed the Beagle Freedom Bill because beagles are the most common breed selected for use in scientific experiments. Fortunately, the number of dogs used at John Hopkins in medical research has already dropped drastically. The number has dropped 90 percent in just 13 years, going from 493 dog subjects in 2005 to 49 in 2017. That means way fewer doggies who need to be homed.

Take Action

A handful of other states – New York, Minnesota, California, Connecticut, Nevada and Illinois – have passed their own versions of Beagle Freedom Bills. That’s great for the animals in those states, but what about research animals in the other parts of the country?

Until we can prevent these animals from becoming test subjects in the first place, the least we can do is make sure that they have loving families for the post-research phase of their lives. Sign this Care2 petition to encourage our federal legislators to finally do right by these vulnerable animals and make sure they get adopted rather than euthanized.

Photo credit: Thinkstock

55 comments

Carole R
Carole R2 months ago

This is the way it should be. Poor pups.

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Glennis W
Glennis W2 months ago

All so awesome Thank you for caring and sharing

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Glennis W
Glennis W2 months ago

Wonderful news Thank you for caring and sharing

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Glennis W
Glennis W2 months ago

Really fantastic Thank you for caring and sharing

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Glennis W
Glennis W2 months ago

Petition signed and shared Thank you for caring and sharing

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michela c
michela c2 months ago

Petition already signed. NO, NO, NO animal testing. Save research animals.

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Renata B
Renata B2 months ago

Already signed last April: let us hope that not only this law will pass for all the states of the USA, but that very, very soon it will be outdated and useless because there will be no more animals in labs.

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HEIKKI R
HEIKKI R7 months ago

thank you

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Peggy P
Peggy Peters7 months ago

This is a great cause. I think we should more of these kinds of efforts promoted on Care2.

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Mark Donner
Mark Donner7 months ago

Animal "researchers" are every one of them criminals. Don't be fooled into thinking they're some kind of "professional" or "intellectual". They all belong in maximum security prison with the other murderers and criminals. If I ever saw one of those monsters I would take steps to protect everyone around me. They're dangerous criminals that are a threat to society.

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