Oregon’s Famous Wandering Wolf Is a Father Again

Since a lone male wolf known as OR-7 made history after becoming the first wolf to travel to California in 87 years, he’s gathered quite a following. Now, wolf advocates are celebrating the arrival of his fifth litter of pups.

OR-7 was born into Oregon’s Imanha pack back in the spring of 2009. He later ventured to California in 2011, where he became the first confirmed wolf to make his way into the state since the last one was killed in 1924. But his adventures didn’t stop there, as he continued to travel thousands of miles on what many believe was a quest for love.

He later returned to Oregon and found a mate, with whom he started the Rogue pack in 2014. This became the first wolf pack in the Oregon Cascades since the early 20th century.

Since then, OR-7 and his mate have welcomed a litter of pups every year. Even though he’s more than nine-years-old, and a grandfather now, he’s done it again.

Wildlife officials confirmed the latest litter of pups, which they captured in recently released video footage by a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service trail camera in the Rogue-Siskiyou National Forest, just north of California’s border.

Breaking: Oregon wolf OR-7 has sired a fifth litter of pups along the Oregon-California border. The pups mother has been…

Posted by Center for Biological Diversity on Wednesday, August 15, 2018

“It seems pretty clear that it’s three,” said John Stephenson, the FWS biologist tracking OR-7 and his family. “We’ve had enough footage of them that if there were more, we would have seen them.”

While the presence of wolves continues to stir mixed reactions, it’s exciting news for those who have been working to see them return to their historic range. As OR-7  and some of his earlier pups have shown, these amazing predators will disperse on their own if we give them space and maintain protection for them.

One of OR-7′s pups has become the breeding male of the only known wolf pack in California, while two of his female pups have also ventured into the state, with one traveling as far as Lake Tahoe.

Unfortunately, wolves continue to face persecution. According to the Center for Biological Diversity, scientific analysis has shown that Oregon alone could support as many as 1,400 wolves, yet there are only 124 in the state — and these animals were stripped of state protection in 2015. Meanwhile, attempts continue to put wolves in the crosshairs by removing federal protection across the lower 48, where they clearly still need it.

“We’re delighted OR-7 is on his fifth successful litter of healthy, bouncing wolf puppies,” said Amaroq Weiss, West Coast wolf advocate at the Center for Biological Diversity. “OR-7 traveled 4,000 miles to find a mate and start a family. But this important recovery can only continue if we keep protecting wolves in Oregon and California and across the United States.”

For more on efforts to protect our native predators and support peaceful coexistence, check out organizations including the Center for Biological DiversityProject Coyote and Predator Defense.

Photo Credit: Krystal Hamlin/Flickr

103 comments

Marie W
Marie Wabout a month ago

Thank you for sharing.

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Jan K
Jan S4 months ago

Thank you

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Glennis Whitney
Glennis W4 months ago

Awesome Thank you for caring and sharing

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Glennis Whitney
Glennis W4 months ago

Fantastic Thank you for caring and sharing

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Glennis Whitney
Glennis W4 months ago

Thank you for caring and sharing

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Glennis Whitney
Glennis W4 months ago

so wonfweful Thank you for caring and sharing

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Marija M
Marija M4 months ago

Just wonderful.

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Hannah K
Past Member 4 months ago

thank you

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susan a
susan a4 months ago

No doubt the murdering hunters will be rubbing their hands together....they should be protected.

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Carole R
Carole R4 months ago

Yay ....more baby wolves!

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