Thanks to Trump and Kim Jong Un, Bomb Shelter Sales Are Booming

Like hundreds of other Americans during the early 1960s Cold War crisis, the owners of a house across the street from me had a bomb shelter installed several feet beneath their backyard lawn.

Fast-forward a few decades. When that house went on the market in the early 2000s, real estate ads described the shelter as a “wine cellar.” After all, what potential home buyers in the early 21st century would be interested in dubious protection from a nuclear attack?

Yet fast-forward nearly another two decades, and the sales of bomb shelters have, well, exploded. Missile tests and the threat of a possible nuclear attack – this time around by North Korea, not Cuba – have made these personal underground bunkers very popular again.

Even before Kim Jong Un threatened to send missiles to Guam and Donald Trump warned those threats would be met with “fire, fury and frankly power the likes of which this world has never seen before,” bomb shelter sales were spiking. In fact, sales began skyrocketing immediately after Election Day.

In California, “There was an uptick two weeks before Trump’s election, and an uptick after the election,” Ron Hubbard, owner of Atlas Survival Shelters, told NBC News. The company is having a great sales year, thanks to North Korea’s firing of missiles. It sold 10 shelters during all of 2011 – and 30 shelters in just three days last month. Hubbard expects to sell 1,000 this year.

“We are back in the 1960s again,” he said. “We’ve got a crazy man on one side and Donald Trump on the other.”

In Texas, Clyde Scott, owner of the Rising S Company, told CNBC bomb shelter sales there increased 500 to 700 percent during the month after the election.

Business is also booming at another Texas-based company, Norad Shelter Systems LLC. “When Trump took office it doubled our sales, and then when he started making crazy statements we got a lot more orders,” the company’s Walton McCarthy said. “Between now and a year ago, we’ve quadrupled our sales.”

Most bomb shelters have air and water filtration systems, blast valves, a sink and toilet, and storage space for at least a two-year supply of food. Prices range from around $45,000 for an 8-by-12 mini bunker, to around $80,000 for one with a shower and bullet-proof door, to millions of dollars for larger, custom models with hot tubs, gyms, lap pools and other essential nuclear winter amenities.

If you’re thinking about buying a bomb shelter, “first vet it carefully with someone knowledgeable about exposure to nuclear fallout,” advises Dr. Robert Levin, chief health officer of Ventura County in California.

For those who don’t have a personal bomb shelter in which to ride out a nuclear attack, Levin recommends going inside “the biggest structure they can find as centrally located as they can.” (It’s probably a good idea to find out now whether any public buildings near your home or workplace are designated fallout shelters.)

Stay inside the building and listen to the emergency broadcasting system to find out whether it’s safe to go outside or if there’s a threat from fallout. (Here are some additional nuclear attack survival tips from the Ready national public service campaign.)

Just how effectively do bomb shelters protect their occupants in the event of a nuclear attack? Hopefully that’s something we’ll never have to find out.

Photo credit: Wikimedia Commons

81 comments

Jack Y
Jack Yabout a year ago

thanks

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Jack Y
Jack Yabout a year ago

thanks

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John J
John Jabout a year ago

thanks for sharing

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John J
John Jabout a year ago

thanks for sharing

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Lesa D
Past Member about a year ago

#50098 petition signed...

thank you Laura...

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Marie W
Marie Wabout a year ago

Thanks for sharing.

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Aaron F
Past Member 1 years ago

No, the thanks go exclusively to the Chairman and the Supreme Leader...and the past presidents who put us in this position with their mealy-mouthed "diplomacy"....

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Carl R
Carl R1 years ago

Thanks!!!!

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Kay M
Kay M1 years ago

sad.

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Mike R
Mike R1 years ago

SAD. thanks

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