Weekly Resistance: How to Take Action Dec. 4-10

As 2017 winds down and Congress prepares to adjourn for the holidays, your voice counts more than ever. Whether at a public protest or on the phone with your senator, you can make a difference!

Not sure who your senators are? You can find their contact information here. Need to reach your representative? You can find that information hereContact information for state and local officials is available here.

And don’t forget to sign up for our newsletter and stay up to date on the latest!

1. Don’t Let the Tax Bill Be a Done Deal

During the late hours of December 1, Senate Republicans successfully pushed their version of the tax bill — but this legislation isn’t law yet. First, it must go to conference committee, where House and Senate members will discuss the differences between their two tax bills, reconciling them to develop a piece of streamlined legislation.

Know:

  • Conference committees can make or break legislation — and some parts of the Senate bill are very unpopular, which could provide a point of traction with your elected officials.
  • Corporations and the rich will benefit most from these proposed changes to the tax code.
  • This tax bill could lead to 13 million more uninsured people.

Contact: your members of Congress: Depending on how they voted on the bill, thank them or express your disappointment. Then tell them that you’d like to see the conference committee address concerns like State and Local Tax Deductions, or SALT, and the spending “triggers” that would result in massive cuts to programs like Medicare and Medicaid.

Act: Consider signing these Care2 petitions:

2. Make Your Community Safer

The anniversary of the infamous Ghost Ship fire in Oakland, California, just passed. In the wake of the fire and 36 lives lost, many communities pledged to address housing safety: Did yours?

Know:

  • In many regions with high costs of living, modified warehouses and other structures are commonly used as illegal living quarters. Tenants may be afraid to report safety violations due to the risk of eviction.
  • Some cities have established “loft laws,” which recognize that such conversations are likely to occur, and strive to improve safety and access to legal reporting options.
  • Modifications like these often lack sprinklers and create warrens of rooms that pose a significant fire and public health hazard.

Contact: your local building or planning department. Ask your officials what kinds of laws the city has to address warehouse and loft conversations, and whether protections for tenants are in place. Consider encouraging a city council member or supervisor to take up this issue, making your community safer for everyone. Particularly in cold winter weather, housing is on everyone’s mind!

3. Help Doug Jones Defeat Roy Moore

The race for a vacant senate seat in Alabama is coming down to the wire after revelations that the Republican candidate, Roy Moore, has been involved in multiple incidents of sexual harassment involving young women. With a razor-thin majority, Republicans can’t afford to lose this seat, and Democrats want to flip it to their side.

Know:

  • You don’t have to live in Alabama to help out with Doug Jones’ campaign.
  • The campaign still needs political contributions, which help to fund “get out the vote” operations on the ground.
  • Remember that you can phone bank from anywhere!

Contact: Get in touch with your local Democratic Committee or progressive activist group to see if they’re running a phone banking event. You can also contact the campaign directly to volunteer.

Act: Consider signing the following Care2 petitions:

4. Support the Disability Integration Act

Last week, the Democratic National Committee issued a statement of support on a number of key disability rights issues, including defending the Americans with Disabilities Act, abolishing subminimum wage and supporting the Disability Integration Act.

Know:

  • This legislation affirms the right of disabled people to live independently in their communities — in addition to being a basic civil right, it’s less costly than institutionalization.
  • The DIA specifically creates a civil rights framework that disabled people can use to press for their right to independent living, strengthening the ADA and existing caselaw.
  • The DIA has been introduced in both the House – HR 2472 – and Senate – S 910.

Contact: your members of Congress. If they’re already listed as cosponsors, thank them! If they aren’t, ask why not — and in the case of Democrats, note that the DNC has identified the DIA as a priority. Tell them you value the right to independent living and equal access to society for all Americans.

Act: Consider signing these Care2 petitions:

5. Oppose Pharma Exec Alex Azar as Health and Human Services Secretary

With Tom Price out at Health and Human Services, Donald Trump has a new man in mind to fill the job: a former pharmaceutical executive.

Know:

  • The HHS budget is around $1.1 billion.
  • Azar oversaw Eli Lilly during spikes in prices for essential drugs, like insulin.
  • Azar is also an opponent of the Affordable Care Act.

Contact: your senators: Tell them you have concerns about whether a former pharmaceutical executive is the best fit to head an agency dedicated to public health and welfare.

Take on a mini-challenge: Struggling for gift ideas this holiday season? Consider giving a newspaper subscription to a classroom. Many newspapers with digital editions offer a bundled deal that allows subscribers to gift a free subscription to a party of their choice, or to sponsor a subscription for a community organization.

Photo credit: Tom Hilton

36 comments

Marie W
Marie W1 months ago

Thanks

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Jetana A
Jetana A7 months ago

I'd like to see these actually appear weekly! Even though I seldom find petitions I haven’t already signed.

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Anne F
Anne F7 months ago

Thanks for the roundup.

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Eric Lees
Eric Lees7 months ago

"abolishing subminimum wage and supporting the Disability Integration Act."

Um you do realize that would put many out of work right? Places like Goodwill hire many disabled people that might not otherwise be able to work. If someone is only able to create $5 worth of work per hour how is a business going to pay them $10? They would have to be subsidized by tax payers which creates a whole new problem. But of course the government is great at creating problems then coming to the "rescue" to "fix" them.

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Mike R
Mike R7 months ago

Petitions signed. Thanks

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Mike R
Mike R7 months ago

Petitions signed. Thanks

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Stephanie s
Stephanie Y7 months ago

All signed, thank you

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Louise A
Past Member 7 months ago

Thank you

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Lisa M
Lisa M7 months ago

Thanks.

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Lisa M
Lisa M7 months ago

Thanks.

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