What Is the New Green Deal?

When newly minted Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez  made waves in the media by suggesting a tax increase to 70 percent for the absolute highest income earners, most of the column space and airtime was dedicated to the apparently mind-blowing proposal that we return to a taxation level that was commonplace prior to President Ronald Reagan.

But what the media barely covered is the plan that the Democrat from New York wanted to fund with this windfall: the New Green Deal. So what exactly does this entail?

The New Green Deal is a combination of policies meant to address both the problem of climate change and income inequality. The plan aims to solve these issues by pushing for the use of cleaner energy resources, while also providing well-paying jobs.

The Sierra Club writes:

The draft [on Ocasio-Cortez's site] says that within 10 years from ‘the start of execution of the Plan,’ the country will be fully powered by renewable energy sources. The proposal also gives a shout-out to that nationwide energy-efficient smart grid that so many renewable energy wonks (and also the actual Department of Energy) have been salivating about for years.

A grid like this could allow thousands of clean energy start-ups to bloom across the country and pay out some major cheddar to the workers who actually build it. The draft proposal also mentions upgrading every residential and industrial building across the country for state-of-the-art energy efficiency and decarbonizing (as in probably electrifying) manufacturing, transportation, and agriculture.

Sounds pretty great, right? Less climate change and pollution, more economic stability and a chance to maybe curb global warming seems like a win-win.

So, of course, the far-right conservatives who control the GOP hate it.

Republicans resent the fact that the original proposal calls to cut the military in half in order to fund the deal, and they’re no more enthused by the open support for mass transit options instead of cars.

But while the likes of the National Review and the Breitbart faction of the right don’t support the New Green Deal, it turns out that a lot of regular Republicans are sort of intrigued by the idea.

The Hill reports:

More than 80 percent of registered voters support the Green New Deal proposal being pushed by progressional Democratic lawmakers, a new poll found. The survey conducted by the Yale Program on Climate Communication and the George Mason University Center for Climate Change Communication found that 92 percent of Democrats and 64 percent of Republicans back the Green New Deal plan.

Considering that the proposal is massively popular with Democrats and supported by almost two-thirds of Republicans, it’s hard to imagine why the New Green Deal is still being treated as if it were some sort of fringe policy proposal.

Despite Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi all but ignoring Ocasio-Cortez’s early January protest at her office, the movement is finally gaining some support in the halls of Congress.

According to the progressive environmental group the Sunrise Movement, there are now 45 Congressional supporters on board, with more signing on every day.

Unfortunately, with a president who is determined to gut and deregulate all environmental protections in order to further stuff the wallets of his rich GOP cronies, it’s hard to imagine the New Green Deal becoming a reality under the Trump administration.

Hopefully as groundswell support grows, we’ll have a more receptive president in place who might understand that if we don’t act now to stop climate change, we may never be able to act at all.

Photo credit: Brian Gratwicke/Flickr

52 comments

Hannah A
Hannah A16 hours ago

thank you

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Daniel N
Daniel N2 days ago

Thanks

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Jan K
Jan S28 days ago

Thank you

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Shae Lee
Shae Lee29 days ago

Thank you for sharing

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Barbara S
Barbara S29 days ago

Thank you for sharing

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Caitlin L
Caitlin Labout a month ago

Thank you

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JinnySITEISSUES L
JinnySITEISSUES Labout a month ago

It is up to us as individuals to take either small or big steps to improve the environment. Bring a cloth bag to a grocery store, recycle the recyclables, purchase fuel efficient vehicles, etc. Like I stated....it's up to us and thank you for sharing.

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Dan Blossfeld
Dan Blossfeldabout a month ago

I am waiting to see that the actual proposal looks like. Idealistic plans are great, but as they say, the devil is in the details. So far, we have no details. Hence, everyone loves it.

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Lisa M
Lisa Mabout a month ago

Thanks.

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Lisa M
Lisa Mabout a month ago

Thanks.

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