Why Put Stones in Your Bird Bath?

Editorís note: This Care2 favorite was originally posted on†June 19, 2014.

Turns out that stones in the bird bath are more than just an aesthetic element. In fact, they may even save a life.

“This morning a little bird was flapping his wings frantically in the bird bath,” said Crystal Carvotta-Brown, a cat rescue volunteer in Massachusetts. “At first I thought he was just cleaning his feathers but then I realized that he was in distress.”

Crystal, an avid community organizer who has helped place hundreds of†throw-away cats, was quick to take action when she sensed danger.

Putting stones in your bird bath could help prevent a bird from drowning.

Crystal explained:

I walked over to him and he didnít even try to fly away so then I thought he was injured. I used a large stick for him to hop on to which he did but then proceeded to try to fly and fell to the ground. He started running away from me. I was able to get him and get him safely into a cat carrier and contacted a wildlife rehabber. Turns out he was just a baby sparrow and got himself pooped out trying to get out of the bird bath because his feathers were all wet and he couldnít fly.

A clean, well-maintained bird bath helps prevent dehyrdration

A clean, well-maintained bird bath helps prevent dehyrdration

She added:

Once he dried off he started flying around inside the cat carrier so I brought him back outdoors and opened the carrier door and off he flew. Iím thrilled that he is okay but canít help but feel stupid for never thinking that the little bit of water in there might be too deep for a baby bird! The rehabber recommended that I put a couple of large stones in the bird bath so that smaller birds can get themselves up on top of them to dry off and get their bearings again.

Perhaps other people know this, but I figured it was worth sharing for those of you that do have bird baths so that if you havenít you can also consider making them safer for the smaller babies.

Crystal hopes that her experience will help others†protect fledgling birds in their yards.

Enjoy more health and safety tips for†backyard†wildlife here:
How to Keep Birds of Prey out of Your Backyard Feeder
The Pros and Cons of Backyard Bird Feeders
How to Help Nesting Birds

Photo Credit: Thinkstock

1315 comments

Marie W
Marie Wabout a month ago

Thanks for sharing

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Jack Y
Jack Y2 months ago

thanks

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Jack Y
Jack Y2 months ago

thanks

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John J
John J2 months ago

thanks for sharing

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John J
John J2 months ago

thanks for sharing

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Marija M
Marija M7 months ago

tks for sharing

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Karen N
Karen N7 months ago

Best also to keep bird baths and the stones in them cleaned regularly to prevent the build up of algae and likewise for bird tables and feeders. It is also best to situate bird baths and feeders away from open areas and close to trees and hedges, so the birds are not too exposed and can quickly find protection if they feel threatened. To protect birds while feeding on the ground or at ground level, it is also worthwhile keeping the lower part of shrubs trimmed so that cats or other predators can't hide behind them unseen. Birds also need a fresh supply of water in the winter as although its cold it can still be dry or any water supply frozen. Birds also still need a regular fresh supply of water in cold dry and freezing weather in winter.

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Filomena C
Filomena C7 months ago

Thanks!

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Carl R
Carl R7 months ago

Thanks

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