4 Effective Eye Exercises to Relieve Astigmatism and Improve Vision

What is Astigmatism?  

Astigmatism is a common eye condition that results in blurred and distorted vision caused by an asymmetrical eye cornea. An asymmetrical cornea keeps the light from focusing on the retina. This leads to blurred vision and frequent headaches. Astigmatism usually accompanies nearsightedness and farsightedness and can decrease or increase over time depending on your diet and lifestyle.

How Eye Exercises Enhance Your Vision

Just the way physical exercise improves overall health, eye exercises for astigmatism work to strengthen vision and ease focus problems. Some of the most popular and effective eye exercises include sunning, palming, gazing, zooming and blinking. Eye exercises mainly work to improve the strength of rectus muscles by relaxing them and reducing their stress. Good nutrition and eye exercises have helped several people who have worn eyeglasses or lenses for years successfully restore their vision. You can try any or all of the eye exercises explained below if you want to strengthen your eye muscles and improve your vision.

Eye Exercises for Astigmatism

 

1. Relax Your Rectus Muscles in the Eye

The purpose of this exercise is to relax the eye muscles. To perform this exercise, try the following:

  • Keep your thumb at a distance of about 10 centimeters in front of you, roughly at the height of your nose.
  • Now slowly move it upwards to a height (12 o’clock) where it is no longer visible and stop for 2 seconds. This position might give you a slight ache.
  • Then move it back to its original position and you will feel your muscles relax. This time, move the thumb to 1 o’clock and then bring it back towards the center.
  • Continue moving the thumb to 3, 5, 7, 9, and 11 until you reach 12 o’clock again.
  • While you move your thumb away from the center, slowly breathe in and when you move it back to the center breathe out so the tense eye muscles can relax.
  • You need to do this exercise starting with 12 o’clock and go clockwise until you complete a full turn and then go counter-clockwise.

2. Practice the Sphere Visualization Exercise

In this exercise, try the following:

  • Imagine that you are looking at a small round object that is roughly the size of your eye.
  • Now try and change the shape of the sphere to oval and elliptical by visualizing that you are clasping it with your fingers and moving it to the right and then to its left.
  • Repeat this for at least 5-10 times after which you can release the pressure. Now imagine clasping the same sphere first from up and then down and then from the front and back.
  • When you are done with the right eye, follow the same instructions for the left eye. This exercise will largely release the tension in the eye and help your lens regain the perfect spherical shape again.

3. Massage Your Eyeballs

This exercise is to be done for a minute right after the sphere visualization exercise, because it is very effective at restoring the natural shape of the lens. Palming can be practiced by placing two fingers on your closed eyelids and applying gentle pressure on them. When massaging your eyeballs, you need to make movements using your fingers from right to left and from up to down, making small circles first clockwise and then counter-clockwise.

4. Try Gazing to Get Your Vision Back to 20/20

This exercise can be done during any time of the day and can be continued until your eyes feel the strain. You can do this exercise without any corrective lens. Start by reading some text in a book. Next, gaze at a faraway object for a while and then get back to the text you were reading. Keep switching to different objects at different depths and focus on them briefly. Continue doing this for a couple of minutes or until your eyes feel tired.

If you are suffering from astigmatism, you should also consider consulting a qualified and experienced ophthalmologist who will help you know which treatment option best meets your visual needs.

 

Aaron Barriga is the online marketing manager for Insight Vision Center, an Ophthalmology Center in California. With a knack for understanding medical procedures, and an interest in eye and vision health, Aaron loves to share what he knows and what he learns. He blogs to inform readers about the latest eye care technology and other topics related to eye care, especially LASIK. Aaron loves collecting coasters from the different bars and restaurants he visits during his travels.

49 comments

Tania N
Tania N4 months ago

Thanks for sharing

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Tania N
Tania N4 months ago

Thanks for sharing

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hELEN h
hELEN h5 months ago

tyfs

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Clare O
Clare O'Beara5 months ago

More ads for the article on public hair removal. Must be a sponsor. Why do you not use a picture of a man? They have hair too I understand.

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Clare O
Clare O'Beara5 months ago

The sensible one here is gazing into the distance. This change of gaze from close to far works the accommodation muscles and flexes the lens.

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Clare O
Clare O'Beara5 months ago

We all look at close up more than we used to.

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Clare O
Clare O'Beara5 months ago

Imagining wrapping your eyeball and squeezing it won't change the shape of your eye. imagine wrapping your waist and squeezing it. point?

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Clare O
Clare O'Beara5 months ago

For the first exercise are we supposed to follow the thumb with your gaze or not? It doesn't say. Nowhere does my vision hurt.

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Danuta W
Danuta W5 months ago

thank you for posting

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Marija M
Marija M5 months ago

tks for sharing

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