5 Must-Read Minimalist Bloggers (Who Also Have Kids)

If you live in North America there’s a good chance you own too much stuff. And if you have kids that number just shot up even further. These clutter stats prove just how crazy Americans are about spending and accumulating stuff.

  • There are 300,000 items in the average American home. [LA Times]
  • 3.1% of the world’s children live in America, but they own 40% of the toys consumed globally. [UCLA]
  • Shopping malls outnumber high schools. And 93% of teenage girls rank shopping as their favorite pastime. [Affluenza]

MINIMALISM IN FAMILIES

Maybe you’re heard about minimalism but always assumed the lifestyle was just for hipsters and child-free couples. After all, how can you possibly live with less when you’ve got kids? I mean, they’re like little clutter magnets aren’t they? The thing is, kids need minimalism as much as adults do.

If you’re feeling overwhelmed by all the clutter in your house —especially the kid clutter— this post is for you. I’ve compiled a list of minimalist bloggers who have kids to show you that the two lifestyles can in fact coexist in relative harmony.

The Minimalist Mom

minimalist bloggers with kidsPhoto Credit: The Minimalist Mom

Rachel aka The Minimalist Mom advocates a rich life with less stuff. Her journey into the joys of living with less kicked off in the fall of 2010. As a stressed out new mom, Rachel was tired of her family’s accumulation of stuff. She embarked on a decluttering spree to find a little peace and space, selling as much as she could to tame the mountain of debt she and her husband had racked up over the years.

Fast-forward to 2018, Rachel has added a few more kids to the equation, moved houses a couple of times and finally taken that leap of faith and left the city for a slower life in the country. The one thing that hasn’t changed is that she still loves sharing the power of minimalism and the joy found in wanting and having less stuff.

She’s written three books: The Minimalist Mom: How to Simply Parent Your Baby, Do Less and The Joy of Doing Nothing.

Start by reading from her website: The Cure for Too Many Toys and Paring down Kid Clothing.

Slow Your Home

minimalist bloggers with kidsPhoto Credit: Slow Your Home

After being diagnosed with severe post natal depression in 2011, Brooke embarked on a one-woman mission to cut out the excess in her life and reconnect with what was really important.

She learnt about minimalism and simplicity, immersed herself in the Slow Living philosophy and discovered the benefits of living with less. Over the course of two years Brooke has decluttered more than 25,000 items, created a Slow Home and rediscovered her health.

Brooke’s mission with Slow Your Home is to help people understand more about simple living. She also hosts The Slow Home Podcast to help spread the idea of a slower pace of life to an even wider audience. She lives in Australia with her husband and two kids.

She’s written two books: Slow – Live Life Simply and Destination Simple – Everyday Rituals for a Slower Life.

Start by reading Brooke’s Decluttering Series and Slow Holidays: our Christmas Traditions.

Raising Simple

minimalist bloggers with kidsPhoto Credit: Raising Simple

Becoming a mother drove Zoë to become more minimalist. In 2010 she and her husband moved from Hawaii to Florida with their two children. The move prompted her to quit ‘the busy life.’

Zoë decided she’d had enough of caring for and maintaining things in her life that were defeating her purpose and passion for living an intentional life. Over the last seven years her family has significantly reduced their possessions, keeping only what they feel adds value to the season they’re in.

As a mom of now four kids, Zoë knows how complicated and cluttered life can be. She says we all want to feel connected and live a meaningful life. Raising Simple shows you how living simpler is better, inside and out.

She’s written one book: Minimalism for Families: Practical Minimalist Living Strategies to Simplify Your Home and Life.

Start by reading Why Families Need Minimalism and Letting Go: 7 Ideas to Help Your Kids.

Simplify & Pursue

minimalist bloggers with kidsPhoto Credit: Simplify & Pursue

Robin is married with two kids, but she didn’t let that stop her from declaring herself a minimalist about four years ago. Now firmly entrenched in the less is more lifestyle, she believes that by reducing our possessions and decluttering our schedules, we give ourselves the freedom to invest in deeper relationships, follow a dream we’ve always wanted or give more time to our passions.

Robin hasn’t written any books yet, but her weekly newsletter promises tips and inspiration to help you simplify your life and pursue what matters most. She’s also available for speaking engagements and declutter consultations.

Start by reading the 5-Step Guide to Declutter Any Area and Minimalist Working Mom: Finding the Time.

Simple Living With Kids

minimalist bloggers with kidsPhoto Credit: Simple Living With Kids

Lee lives in New Zealand with her partner and their four kids (from two families). She raises some pertinent questions on Simple Living With Kids. Does Santa understand simple living and tight budgets? Has the Easter Bunny even heard of moderation? Is it even possible to raise kids who value hard work, fair play, friendship and family more than the latest fashions and gadgets?

Lee believes it is possible—and ordinary families like them can get there. It just takes a little extra thought and care.

Lee hasn’t written any books yet, but her blog has a ton of great content on it. To avoid overwhelm, check out her Start Here page first.

Start by reading Keeping Kid-Clutter Under Control and Five Christmas Toys I’d Buy Again – And Ten I Wouldn’t.

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Photo Credit: Thinkstock

46 comments

KimJ M
KimJ ManyIssues2 months ago

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KimJ M
KimJ ManyIssues2 months ago

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KimJ M
KimJ ManyIssues2 months ago

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Paulo R
Paulo Reeson4 months ago

ty

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Paulo R
Paulo Reeson4 months ago

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Catherine F
Catherine F4 months ago

They should be able to have a few nice things though. Maybe if they do chores and save up pocket money that can still help them value hard work. BTW Parents should never interfere with kids social life unless they are sure it's dangerous for the child.

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Ramesh B
Ramesh B4 months ago

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Paulo R
Paulo Reeson4 months ago

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Paulo R
Paulo Reeson4 months ago

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KimJ M
KimJ ManyIssues4 months ago

Tfs

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