7 Annoying Walking Pains You Should Never Ignore

Walking is undeniably one of the best exercises anyone can do. Studies have proven it improves your heart health, eases stress, enhances weight loss and much more. It’s also a great workout for seniors or people who are obese, because it doesn’t put a lot of stress on the body.

However, walking isn’t always a pain-free exercise. As surprising as it sounds, putting one foot in front of the other can trigger pain sometimes. Sadly, most walkers ignore the pain not realizing it could be a sign of a serious problem.

While limping and bearing the pain may work sometimes, don’t ignore these walking pains that could indicate something more serious.

A picture of a walker having problems with ankle in the forest

1. Pain on the Side of the Big Toe

Pain on the side of the big toe could mean you’ve developed a bunion. Bunions usually develop due to misalignment of bones in the big or small toe, and they result in pain and swelling.

You’re more likely to develop bunions if you have flat feet, low arches or you wear narrow shoes.

You can counteract bunions by wearing wider shoes. Icing the affected toe for 20 minutes every day also helps. Note that severe cases may require physical therapy treatment or surgery.

2. Heel Pain

Your heel should be the first part of your foot to touch the ground every time you step forward, so you can understand why heel pain makes it virtually impossible to walk properly.

Pain that spreads from your heel to the front of your foot while walking is a sign of plantar fasciitis.

Since plantar fasciitis is an overuse injury, reducing the number of steps you walk in a day may eliminate the pain. Note that ignoring heel pain can lead to tragic injuries because it sabotages walking form.

3. Pain in the Calf Muscles

Most times, we suffer pain in the calf muscles due to muscle tightness. Stretching your calves regularly eases this type of pain.

However, pain in the calf muscles can also be a sign of peripheral artery disease. A condition characterized by narrowing of peripheral arteries, it mostly affects the leg muscles.

Calf pain accompanied by regular leg cramps is a clear indicator something is wrong. Note that the pain intensifies while walking and goes away when you rest. The pain can also occur in the butt, thighs and foot.

See your doctor if you suspect you have peripheral artery disease.

4. Lower Back Pain

If you’re experiencing lower back pain while walking, chances are you have postural problems. Poor posture puts excess pressure on your spine, which causes lower back pain.

Luckily, you can use these hip stretches to improve your posture.

The pain may also be the result of tearing of muscles in the lower back. If you suspect that’s the case, avoid high impact exercises until the pain subsides.

5. Shin Pain

Shin pain could mean you have stress fractures on your shin bones. This is especially true if you walked a long distance without prior training.

Going on a walking marathon or a daylong hike can also cause shin splints, which is a less serious condition. Luckily, the pain can vanish in as little as two weeks if you walk less and avoid high impact exercises.

If your shin pain lasts longer than two weeks, despite resting, talk to your doctor.

6. Knee Pain

Is your knee throbbing every time you take a step? It may be a sign of tendonitis, which is an inflammation or irritation of a tendon in your knee.

The good news is stretching can ease the pain, if it’s moderate. However, you must see a doctor or a chiropractor if the pain is severe.

7. Hip Pain

Most times, it’s hard to pinpoint the real cause of hip pain, because there are many potential causes. But if you have one longer leg or you’ve been walking too much it could mean you have bursitis.

Reduce your steps, and focus on non-weight bearing exercises, such as cycling and swimming, until the pain disappears.

Pain is not your enemy. Pain can actually be good, because it warns us that something is wrong and needs to be fixed. The next time you suffer pain while walking, take the counteractive measures I’ve suggested above.

56 comments

danii p
danii p13 days ago

Thank you

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danii p
danii p13 days ago

Thank you

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Anne G
Anne G14 days ago

Thanks

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Alina Kanaski
Alina Kanaski14 days ago

Thanks for sharing!

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Kathy K
Kathy K17 days ago

thanks

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Susan B
Susan B17 days ago

Comfortable shoes help.

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Susan B
Susan B17 days ago

Thanks

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Daniel N
John N17 days ago

Thank you

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Angela S
Angela K17 days ago

Thanks for sharing

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hELEN h
hELEN hEARFIELD18 days ago

tyfs

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