A Surprising Way to Reduce Your Breast Cancer Risk

When you think of ways to reduce your breast cancer risk you probably think of quitting smoking, eating a plant-based diet, exercising, reducing stress and cutting out harmful chemicals, but you may not give your gut a second thought. And while all of these are important ways to help prevent breast cancer, new research shows that your gut may be a primary factor in whether or not you’ll get a breast cancer diagnosis.

The study, published in the journal Cancer Research found that imbalanced gut bacteria encourages the growth and organization of cancer cells, contributing to the risk of the disease. Known as dysbiosis, or an overgrowth of harmful bacteria, the researchers found that the harmful bacteria present in the gut encourage inflammation and drive the spread of breast cancer.

This type of research is still in its infancy so we can’t say with any degree of certainty whether eating more fermented foods or supplementing with probiotics could help to address the dysbiosis and prevent breast cancer, but it does give us insight into the role of harmful bacteria, the gut and cancer. Future research will help us to discover ways to benefit from the newfound knowledge.

Earlier research into other types of cancer may hold some clues. According to research published in the medical journal Hepatogastroenterology, probiotic supplementation improved the bowels of people suffering from colon cancer. The scientists concluded that their findings “suggest the possibility of preventing colorectal carcinoma with probiotics.”

We also know that probiotics can play a role as anti-cancer agents, at least with colon cancer, as well as potentially improving the efficacy of chemotherapy, and reducing the ill-effects of radiation therapy in the treatment of cancer. Other research on smokers, who are definitely at a disadvantage when it comes to cancer, found that probiotic supplementation exerted a beneficial effect on the immune system. According to research in the British Journal of Nutrition, daily intake of the probiotic Lactobacillus casei Shirota increased natural killer cell activity in smokers.

That might sound like a bad thing, but natural killer cells are one of the immune system’s weapons against cancer and other illnesses, so increasing their numbers, particularly in smokers who tend to have lower levels of these immune compounds, may help protect them against cancer.

6 Natural Ways to Overcome Dysbiosis

Avoid packaged or processed foods that contain titanium dioxide. The food additive is found in many common foods especially yogurt and vegan yogurt. Research shows that this ingredient turns gut bacteria into weapons of disease by turning your own gut bacteria against you. The research, published in the journal Frontiers in Nutrition found that the food additive could cause dysbiosis. So, before you chow down on your daily yogurt, be sure it is free from this toxic ingredient.

Eat more fermented foods like yogurt, plant-based yogurt, sauerkraut, kimchi, miso and other foods with live cultures. These beneficial bacteria help us to overcome harmful ones that reside in our gut.

Reduce your sugar intake. Sugar feeds harmful bacteria and yeasts. Cutting out sweets is integral to getting your gut back on track.

Use herbs that can kill harmful microbes, including: oregano, thyme and ginseng. Follow package instructions for the product you select.

Eat a plant-based diet. Harvard University scientists published a study in the journal Nature, which showed that diet alters the microorganisms residing in the gut in as little as 2 days.

Eat less meat and dairy. The Harvard University study found that meat or dairy consumption influences the type and activity of the microorganisms residing in the gut increasing inflammation.

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Dr. Michelle Schoffro Cook, PhD, DNM shares her food growing, cooking, preserving, and other food self-sufficiency adventures at FoodHouseProject.com. She is the publisher of the free e-newsletter World’s Healthiest News and an international best-selling and 20-time published book author whose works include her newest book: FOOD FIX: The Most Powerful Healing Foods and How to Use Them to Overcome Disease. Follow her work.

 

97 comments

Dr. Jan Hill
Dr. Jan H2 days ago

thanks

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Isabel A
Isabel A2 days ago

Thanks for sharing.

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Carol S
Carol S2 days ago

Thanks

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Carol S
Carol S2 days ago

Thanks

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Carol S
Carol S2 days ago

Thanks

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Elinor Dorrian
Elinor D4 days ago

Probiotics are actually pretty good.

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Elinor Dorrian
Elinor D4 days ago

oh, ok.

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Tania N
Tania N4 days ago

Thanks for sharing.

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Tania N
Tania N4 days ago

Thanks for sharing.

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Tania N
Tania N4 days ago

Thanks for sharing.

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