Have Asthma? Do Yoga

Asthma can be a real struggle, especially for those who live in polluted or dusty areas. Getting outside for some exercise can be a nightmare. Should you shut yourself inside, safe with a steady heartbeat and filtered air? That doesn’t seem very healthy either. Luckily, slight relief might lie in the common meditative exercise we all know and love—yoga.

A recent review suggests that yoga can improve the symptoms and quality of life for those suffering from asthma. Some of the studies under review primarily considered the breath work in yoga, while others considered the physical poses and meditative properties of the practice.

In all, the review considered 15 randomized, controlled trials from various countries. In these trials, they found evidence in five studies that yoga can improve an asthma-sufferer’s quality of life and symptom management. Unfortunately, its effect on lung function, especially while unmedicated, remains more uncertain.

While there isn’t enough evidence yet to encourage anyone to reduce or get off their asthma medication, the research does look promising and may improve the future options of asthma treatment.

However, it does seem clear that yoga can improve the quality of life for those with asthma. Get a head start by trying out this pose for enhanced lung function:

Trikonasana/Triangle Pose

Sporty beautiful young woman doing Trikonasana

Not only does this pose open the lungs and chest cavity, but it also lengthens and strengthens your spine and important abdominal muscles. According to Art of Living, here are steps to get into the position, although I recommend getting a professional to help you if you’re a novice:

1. Stand straight. Separate your feet comfortably wide apart (about 3.5-4 ft).

2. Turn your right foot out 90 degrees and left foot in by 15 degrees.

3. Align your center of right heel with the center of your left arch.

4. Press your feet deep into the ground and balance your bodyweight equally over them.

5. Inhale deeply. As you exhale, bend your body to the right, downward from the hips, keeping the waist straight, allowing your left hand to come up in the air while your right hand comes down towards floor. Keep both arms in a straight line.

6. Rest your right hand on your shin, ankle or the floor outside your right foot, whatever is possible while still holding the pose. Stretch your left arm toward the ceiling, in line with the tops of your shoulders. Keep your head in a neutral position or turn it to the ceiling, eyes gazing to the upper hand. Make sure you are bending sideways and not backwards.

7. Breathe deeply and consistently to allow the body to relax into the position.

8. After a few breathes, take an inhale and roll up, letting your top arm lead you out of the pose. Repeat in the opposite side.

Yoga can be an excellent tool for disease management and health. Even if you don’t suffer from asthma, breathing a little more deeply is beneficial for everybody.

Related:

How to Harness Your Inner Badass
Do YOU and a Nutritionist Agree on What Is Healthy?
Can Stretching Make You Happier?

79 comments

Thomas M
Thomas Mabout a month ago

tyfs

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Paulo R
Paulo R5 months ago

ty

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Paulo R
Paulo R5 months ago

ty

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William C
William Cabout a year ago

Thank you.

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W. C
W. Cabout a year ago

Thanks.

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Jeanne R
Jeanne Rogersabout a year ago

TYFS

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Jeanne R
Jeanne Rogersabout a year ago

TYFS

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Jeanne R
Jeanne Rogersabout a year ago

TYFS

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Jeanne R
Jeanne Rogersabout a year ago

TYFS

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Jeanne R
Jeanne Rogersabout a year ago

TYFS

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