How Does Heat Affect Your Indoor Plants?

Heat has direct and indirect effects on indoor plants this time of year. Here’s how to take better care of your plants this summer.

Depending on what part of the country you live in, you are either shielding your outdoor plants from too much sun or allowing them to bask in the warmth of its pure shine. Either way, your outdoor plantscan fare well in the summer heat, assuming you’re watering them enough. But what about their indoor friends?

Impact of Heat on Indoor Plants

How can heat really be a problem for indoor plants? Most plants are sitting nicely inside a cool room receiving either direct or indirect light from a nearby window. If you’re one of the 87 percentof American homes with air conditioning, then heat isn’t having an interesting impact on your houseplants.

Indirect Effects of Heat on Indoor Plants

Rather than heat having a direct impact on your indoor plants, it’s having an indirect impact by influencing your thermostat. You most likely have your air conditioning on to keep your home between 68 and 78 degrees, depending on the time of day.

It’s these cool blasts that have the biggest impact on your plants.

The ideal temperature for most houseplants is between 60 and 75 degrees Fahrenheit, which means that yourindoor temperature isn’t having a huge impact on your plants, unless they sit right underneath a vent. The direct air on your lovely indoor plant allows the moisture in the plant to quickly evaporate, leaving the soil and plant dry.

Similarly, if the plant sits in the sill of a window that receives direct sun (particularly afternoon sun), then your plant is more likely to heat up despite the room’s cool temperature.This will have a similar effect to direct air blowing on the plant. The humidity level will significantly decrease.

How Does Heat Affect Your Indoor Plants?

Direct Effects of Heat onIndoorPlants

Heats indirect impact may be more prevalent for those who like a cooler home or live in hotter locations and have air conditioners. If you live in a more temperate environment or don’t have air conditioning, your indoor plants are more likely to feel the direct effects of heat.

When you allow your indoor temperatures to be greater than 75 degrees Fahrenheit, you should watch out for signs of intolerance from your plants. While these temperatures are fine for plants placed outdoors, it’s not the same forindoor plants.

Indoor plants don’tlive in the same conditions as their outdoor neighbors.

Outside, the sun and humidity create an environment that makes higher temperatures more tolerable for many plants.Inside,your plants don’t have the same exposure to sun and humidity.

You know your plant is getting too much heat if it starts to lose its flowers its, leaves wilt, the edges of leaves become dry and crisp, it constantly requires water, or you notice diminished growth.

How to Mitigate the Effects of Heat on Your Indoor Plants

If you want your plants to thrive indoors, then you’ll need to address humidity, light, air, and watering. Try these tips:

  • Place your plants near a window to increase the amount of direct light, so long as it’s not the direct afternoon sun and the plant isn’t smashed against the window.
  • Find a new location for plants that have previously lived underneath vents.
  • Consider misting your plants or providing a tray of water beneath the plant to increase the relative humidity in that vicinity. If you decide to use a tray of water, then be sure to place a layer of gravel on which the pot can sit while the water rests beneath.This keeps the bottom of the plant from sitting in the water.
  • Ensure you’re watering on a regular basis. Watering should increase in the summertime for outdoor and indoor plants since it’s hotter and dryer.

Images via Thinkstock

55 comments

Maria P
Maria P2 months ago

Thank you

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Ingrid A
Ingrid A2 months ago

tyfs

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Clare O'Beara
Clare O'Beara2 months ago

During summer I sometimes get a plague of greenflies on a few plants indoors. I have to put them outdoor as as nothing clears the flies. Once outside the greenflies go after a few days. I think wasps get them.

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Clare O'Beara
Clare O'Beara2 months ago

Remember that the pot can literally bake the roots if it sits in full sun

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Clare O'Beara
Clare O'Beara2 months ago

We do not use any cooling effect in our house except opening a window.

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Mona M
Mona M2 months ago

Tks, not the problem at the moment, humidity is.

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Janis K
Janis K2 months ago

Thanks for sharing.

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Winn A
Winn A2 months ago

Thanks

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Winn A
Winn A2 months ago

Noted

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Beverly D
Beverly D2 months ago

I've had many - gotta Have my plants. :) Thanks & God bless~

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